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Full text of "Catalogue Of The Mingana Collection, vol. 3"

WOODBROOKE CATALOGUES 

Vol. Ill 




LAFAYETTE LID 






CATALOGUE 



OF 



THE MINGANA COLLECTION 



OF 



MANUSCRIPTS 

NOW IN THE POSSESSION OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE 
WOODBROOKE SETTLEMENT, SELLY OAK, BIRMINGHAM 



VOL. Ill 

ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC AND 
SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 



BY 

A. ' MINGANA 



CAMBRIDGE 
W. HEFFER AND SONS, LIMITED 

!939 



PRTNTED IN GREAT BRITAIN BY 
THE ABERDEEN UNIVERSITY PRESS LIMITED 



ALPHONSE MINGANA 
• 1881-1937 

BY D. S. MARGOLIOUTH AND G. WOLEDGE 

It is with profound sorrow that the Library of the Selly Oak Colleges issues this Supplementary 
Catalogue. On 5th December, 1937, the scholar who not only compiled it, but by rare knowledge, 
skill, and enterprise had secured the documents which it enumerates, passed away. He had 
regarded the description of the materials which he had amassed as sufficient occupation for a 
lifetime ; into a career which terminated in middle life he had crowded work which might well 
have occupied several lifetimes of longer duration. 

Alphonse Mingana was born on the 23rd December, 1881, in the neighbourhood of Mosul. 
His father, Paul Mingana, was a landowner, who by his services to the Church had earned the 
title Reverend ; his mother's name was Marie Nanni. He was the eldest of their eight children. 
They belonged to the Chaldean community (i.e. that branch of the Nestorians which had accepted 
the authority of Rome ; the name Assyrians has in recent times been given to the others). They 
sent their son for education to the Lycee St. Jean in Lyons. Here he acquired complete command 
of the French language, and his European training, aided by natural gifts and serious study, 
enabled him to acquire the classical learning of Europe and the most important of its modern 
tongues. The language of his native country was Arabic, the ecclesiastical language of his 
community Syriac, and its vernacular a modern descendant of this last. Other languages with 
which his environment rendered him familiar were Persian, Kurdish, and Turkish. 

Returning to Mosul, he studied there at the Syro-Chaldsean Seminary, which was conducted 
by French Dominicans for the training of priests for the two Syriac-speaking uniate Churches, 
Syrian and Chaldaean ; and, after ordination, he remained here until 1913. From 1902 to 1910 
he was professor of Syriac ; he acted as director of the Dominican press ; and he travelled 
extensively on behalf of the Seminary in the surrounding country. During these years he laid 
the foundations of his life-work in two directions. Firstly, he collected, presumably for the 
Seminary, seventy Syriac manuscripts, twenty of them on vellum ; they were unfortunately 
burnt during the war of 1914-1918. He had already, no doubt, the enthusiasm for manuscripts 
in themselves which in later years underlay his scholarly work on their contents, and which 
combined the skill of an expert palaeographer, the acumen of a shrewd business man, and the zeal 
of a schoolboy stamp-collector. Secondly, he took charge of the printing of a Syriac service- 
book, wrote a Syriac grammar, and edited a number of Syriac texts, for his work on one of which, 
the Narsai homilies et carmina, he received a papal doctorate of divinity. This work gave him 



vi MINGANA COLLECTION 

a profound knowledge of Christian theology, minute acquaintance with the differences between 
the sects in theory and practice, and interest in the early spread of Christianity — all matters to 
which his later publications bear abundant testimony. 

As a result of theological difficulties, he left Mosul on the 7th January, 1913, and spent two 
months travelling in Persia and the Ottoman Empire, during which he was entertained at Mardin 
by an American Protestant missionary named Andrews, whose hospitality he never forgot. On 
the 17th March, 1913, he left the East, never to return except for the visits noted below, and came 
to England, where he was attracted to Woodbrooke, the Quaker Settlement for Social and Religious 
Study at Selly Oak, Birmingham, by the reputation for oriental scholarship and for friendship 
with Eastern Christianity of Dr. Rendel Harris, who was Director of Studies there from its 
foundation in 1903 until 1915. 

He spent his first weeks in Birmingham in the house of Rendel Harris, who could give 
sympathetic friendship to the exile and understanding encouragement to the scholar ; and then 
moved into Woodbrooke. His knowledge of the English language was slight, and based largely 
on Shakespeare and the Bible, and he was in other ways an unusual guest for a Quaker com- 
munity, but his gifts and his character made him welcome. He found much that was congenial 
in its spiritual life, in which traditional Quaker simplicity was enlivened by the devotional 
genius of Rendel Harris ; he found, too, a congenial atmosphere for his work, and personal 
friendship ; and it was at Woodbrooke that he met the Norwegian lady, Emma Sophie Floor 
of Stavanger, whom he married in 1915. He stayed at Woodbrooke for a period of over two 
years, during the latter part of which he taught Eastern languages, — Arabic for missionaries 
and Hebrew for theological students ; and he remained warmly attached to it throughout his 
life, choosing the name " Woodbrooke Studies " for the series in which he gave the world editions 
of some among the most important of the documents which he had brought to light. 

Community of studies also won for him the friendship of Mrs. A. S. Lewis and Mrs. M. D. 
Gibson, famous travellers and discoverers of important manuscripts connected with early and 
Eastern Christianity ; and it was while staying in their house in Cambridge in November, 1913, 
that he discovered the significance of the text of some palimpsest Qur'an leaves in Mrs. Lewis's 
possession, which formed the subject of his first contribution to Islamic scholarship. (By an 
odd coincidence, amongst his latest acquisitions, though he did not live to identify it, was a stray 
leaf from the same manuscript.) 

It was while he was at Woodbrooke, too, that, as the appended bibliography will show, he 
began a fruitful stream of contributions to learned periodicals, which only ceased with his life, 
though in later years the more substantial work of editing and cataloguing left him less time for 
this form of work. 

In July, 1915, he was appointed to the staff of the John Rylands Library, Manchester, to 
catalogue its rich collection of Arabic MSS., of which the nucleus is that formed by the twenty- 
fifth and twenty-sixth Earls of Crawford, and bought by Mrs. Rylands in 190 1. He remained 
there till 1932, having latterly the title of Keeper of the Oriental MSS. 



• ALPHONSE MINGANA vii 

His catalogue appeared in 1934, after he had left Manchester ; but during his years there he 
was a frequent contributor to the Bulletin published by the Library, and edited important texts 

preserved there. 

In 1920 he became naturalised in this country; he became one of the most loyal of 
Englishmen, though he remained one of the least typical ; his use of English became fluent and 
expressive, but never lost a colour and a vivacity rare amongst us ; and he would boast, with 
a complete freedom from its restraints, of our phlegmatic national character. During the War 
of 1914-1918 he served his adopted country by acting as censor for the letters of Assyrian refugees, 
and by compiling for the Admirality and the War Office vocabularies of Arabic, Persian, Turkish, 
Kurdish, and Syriac. He also helped to inform public opinion by numerous articles in the 
Manchester Guardian on political and social conditions in the Near and Middle East. To the end 
of his life he maintained a lively interest in Eastern politics and church affairs, keeping in touch 
with ecclesiastical dignitaries there, as well as with the Syrian emigrants to the Americas. 

During his Manchester years his two children, a son and a daughter, were born. 

From 1916 to 1923 he was Special Lecturer in Arabic in the University of Manchester ; but 
he found lecturing irksome and uncongenial, and his influence over younger scholars was more 
happily exercised in private discussion. Dr. W. C. van Unnik, who worked at the Mingana 
Collection in Selly Oak, acknowledges the way in which " this Western-Eastern scholar " had 
brought the East near to him. 

In 1924 began the remarkable alliance of his talents with the munificent and understanding 
patronage of Dr. Edward Cadbury, whose friendship he owed to his connection with Woodbrooke. 
In the years 1924, 1925 and 1929 he undertook at Dr. Cadbury's expense three expeditions in 
search of manuscripts. In the first of these, in the spring of 1924, he travelled from Beirut to 
Aleppo, Mosul, Sulaimania, and Hamadan ; he bought for the Rylands twenty-two Arabic and 
some Syriac manuscripts, and for Dr. Cadbury a few Syriac ones, which formed the nucleus of 
the Mingana Collection. In the autumn of 1925, travelling through Damascus, Baghdad, Kerman- 
shah, the Mosul vilayet, and South Kurdistan, he added extensively to the Syriac collection, and 
also obtained some Arabic manuscripts. In 1929 he visited the Sinai Peninsular and Upper 
Egypt as far as the Third Cataract, acquiring mainly Arabic manuscripts. 

During the War of 1914-1918 the East and West Syrian communities had been reduced 
in numbers and scattered ; churches and monasteries were destroyed, and Mingana's first 
two journeys were made at the moment when manuscripts which had passed into private 
hands could be rescued from the loss or destruction which might otherwise have overtaken 
them. Mingana had, moreover, the probably unique combination of qualities which was 
necessary to carry out this work : his skill in languages, his knowledge of the geography of the 
region, of its ecclesiastical affairs, and of the history and topography of its towns and villages, 
his experience of its manners and customs, the status of his British nationality, and the 
support of British wealth. But even so it was a difficult and dangerous undertaking, and 
Mingana's personal courage and resource were not least among the things that made it possible. 
He afterwards talked from time to time of writing an account of his journeys ; but there was 



Vlll 



MINGANA COLLECTION 



alwavs some more urgent work of scholarship to claim his time, and he left nothing but a few 
mees of anecdotes : how an official on the frontier between Syria and Iraq, seeing the tit e 
S Dr " on his passport, kept him waiting till all the invalids of the neighbourhood could assemble 
_a situation which he dealt with by distributing the contents of a bottle of quinine ; how as 
the guest of the " devil-worshipping " (Yezidi) mayor of a small town near Mosul he passed a 
night in which vermin made sleep impossible, and heard at dawn from an adjacent Jacobite 
church the words " O ye things that creep on the surface of the earth, bless ye the Lord ! —a 
Braver in which he was disinclined to join ; how in Kurdistan he was offered Christian manuscripts 
earlier than the time of Christ-which proved to be printed books of the twentieth century ; 
how in a village in Tur Abdin two Kurds persuaded him to draw up a document conveying, in 
discharge of an earthly debt, the debtor's right to one houri in Paradise. 

The following Bibliography indicates the vast range of his researches, about which a little 

may be said Though his interest was mainly in Christian antiquities, he was well versed in the 

literature of Islam, frequently lectured to students on the subject, and made many important 

contributions to the study of it. Shortly after his arrival in England he assisted Mrs. A. S Lewis 

in deciphering Leaves from Three Ancient Qur'ans, containing some remarkable and possibly pre- 

Othmanic variants ; on the title-page of this book, which has a very learned and thoughtful 

Introduction, his name figures before hers. He afterwards brought to light an early Synac 

translation of the Moslem Sacred Book, which also preserves noteworthy variants ; and one of 

his latest works furnishes an account of An Important Manuscript of the Traditions of Bukhan, 

a collection which, with the Sunnis, is only second in authority to the Qur'an, with an Introduction 

which may weU prove epoch-making in the study of Mohammedan Tradition. The key which 

he has provided furnishes the solution of many difficulties which confront the student of that 

work and those with which it is associated. 

Another work in which he figures on the title-page as collaborator is the elaborate edition 
of the Odes and Psalms of Solomon, issued by the John Rylands Library in 1920. The Psalms 
had long been known in a Greek text ; the Odes, of which some fragments had been known from 
citation in the Coptic Pistis Sophia, were discovered by Rendel Harris in a Synac text. Their 
publication aroused great interest and various theories were put forward as to the community 
to which they should be ascribed. In what may be called the conclusive edition, for which 
Dr Harris obtained Dr. Mingana's co-operation, the Coptic fragments as well as the Synac text 
are incorporated, and in the elaborate Introduction and Commentary which accompany them 
references to them are collected from Syriac authors with great learning, and the various views 
of their import are carefully examined, with arguments in favour of the editors' own opinions. 
Two documents of the first importance for early controversy between Christians and Moslems 
were brought to light by Dr. Mingana. One of these, The Book of Religion and Empire, was 
produced by him from a MS. in the John Rylands Library, and published in the original Arabic 
with English translation. It is by a convert from Christianity to Islam, whose patron was the 
Caliph Mutawakkil (a.d. 847-861), and is the earliest collection on a large scale of passages in the 
two Testaments, supposed to foretell the mission of the prophet Mohammed. This Apology, for 



ALPHONSE MINGANA 1X 

which the author used the Syriac Bible, can be shown to be the source of later works which have 
the same object. A Beirut Jesuit, who declared the work to be a forgery (even insinuating that 
it was Mingana's own, though with what object could not even be imagined) was easily refuted, 
among others by Professor Margoliouth, whose acquaintance with Dr. Mingana commenced in 
1914, and developed into cordial friendship, maintained by continual correspondence. Professor 
Margoliouth was fortunate in securing his co-operation for the article " Qur'an " in the Encyclo- 
pedia of Religion and Ethics, and his frequent visits to Manchester when compiling the Catalogue 
of Arabic Papyri in the John Rylands Library enabled him to see much of Dr. Mingana and 
profit by his wide and accurate erudition. Professor Margoliouth was gratified to find him in 
accordance with himself on more than one literary question about which they seem to be in a 
minority. His services also extended to the late Mrs. Margoliouth, who, in preparing her Supple- 
ment to her father's Thesaurus Syriacus, found him willing to revise the proofs and furnish her 
with information which she could scarcely have obtained from any other source. 

Besides bringing to light this Apology for Islam to Christians, he also discovered and published, 
this time in Syriac, an Apology for Christianity addressed by Patriarch Timothy to the Caliph 
Mahdi (a.d. 775-785). Among various interesting matters dealt with in the Introduction to 
this Apology is the defence of the authenticity of the Apology ascribed to al-Kindi, which had 

been disputed. . 

Another work of outstanding importance which comes late in the Bibliography is The Book 
of Treasures by Job of Edessa, edited in 1935 in Syriac, with an English translation and a very 
lucid and comprehensive Introduction. Its author lived till a.d. 832, and his work is correctly 
described as an Encyclopedia of philosophical and natural sciences as taught in Baghdad about 
a.d. 817. To render this work into fluent and intelligible English, with correct equivalents for 
the scientific terms, required an unusual amount of both special and general knowledge, as well 
as profound acquaintance with Syriac idiom. Its value for the history of Moslem science and 
philosophy is unquestionable, and it is likely to be the subject of much research. This was the 
first of a series called Woodbrooke Scientific Publications, to take the place of W oodbrooke Studies, 
of which seven volumes had appeared from 1927 to 1934, similarly financed by Dr. E. Cadbury, 
and containing editions with translations of Christian documents in Syriac, Arabic, and Garshum 
(Arabic written in Syriac characters : Dr. Mingana has the merit of ascertaining the correct 
spelling and import of the name). The first four of these volumes (1927 to 1931) appeared in 
the Bulletin of the John Rylands Library, and were issued simultaneously as independent works ; 
it was at first arranged that Dr. Rendel Harris should prefix Introductions to the texts included, 
but this did not last beyond the second volume ; Dr. Harris's work exhibits the learning, the 
sagacity, and the humour which characterise all his writings. He himself about this time 
migrated to Birmingham. Of the texts published in Woodbrooke Studies some are reproduced in 
rotograph, but in the greater number of cases the more legible moveable types are employed. 
A few words may be said about the content of this remarkable series. 

The first place for importance should be assigned to the Syriac translations of lost works 
by Theodore of Mopsuestia {ob. a.d. 428). These treatises On the Nicene Creed, On Baptism, 



x MINGANA COLLECTION 

and On Eucharist and Liturgy, form the content of Volumes IV and V, and an elaborate Intro- 
duction demonstrates their value for the history of Christian doctrine and liturgical theory and 
practice. It is also of importance for its defence of the theological position of this Father, 
reminding the reader of the defence of that of Bardesanes given in the edition of the Odes of 
Solomon. This may not improperly be described as the most considerable contribution to 
Patristic literature made in recent times. 

Considerable attention was given in the English, the Continental, and the American press 
to a number of Apocryphal works discovered by Dr. Mingana in his travels and given the world 
in Woodbrooke Studies. In a note on page 355 of Volume III he enumerates no fewer than eight 
documents of this type published by him between 1927 and 1931. Like the previously known 
New Testament Apocrypha they contain fantastic amplifications of and additions to the Biblical 
narratives, without, it must be confessed, much respect for either historical truth or chronology. 

In one of these Pontius Pilate is transformed into a Christian confessor and martyr, and the 
emperor Tiberius into an earnest believer in Christ. The beginnings of these aberrations can be 
traced to an early period of Christian literature. Another treatise called The Vision of Theophilus 
records miraculous, though not very consistent, episodes connected with the Flight into Egypt, 
narrated in the First Gospel. 

The bulkiest, and in several respects the most curious of these documents, is the Apocalypse 
of Peter (called also Book of Rolls), of which the Garshuni text and translation occupy the greater 
part of Volume III. Claiming to be a revelation by the Apostle Peter to Clement, it follows the 
apocalyptic method of indicating persons by cryptic hints, and evidently carries its prophecies 
well into Mohammedan times. The identification of the names thus indicated, as well as that 
of many places mentioned, was, after some attempts, abandoned by the editor. The work is 
remarkable for the vehemence with which it attacks St. Paul, and asserts the orthodoxy of the 
Romans. While one recent writer would find actual history imbedded in this literature, most 
theologians regard them as works of the imagination, of no value for history or doctrine. Dr. 
Mingana, while quoting the latter opinion, leaves this question undecided. 

If the preparation of these editions, however arduous the research involved, must have had 
all the pleasure which attaches to the production of original work, that of compiling catalogues 
must have been mainly laborious. Classification, identification, measuring, and indexing, are 
the chief operations involved, and the result is a volume not intended to be perused, but only to 
be consulted. Several stately volumes of this sort are the product of Dr. Mingana's industry. 
That of the Arabic MSS. in the John Rylands Library, mentioned above, is of some 1200 pages 
quarto, and deals with 818 items. Nearly as bulky is that of his own collection of Syriac MSS., 
now in the Library of the Selly Oak Colleges, and one of the most important collections in Europe. 
The present volume brings the number of these up to 662, and that of the Christian Arabic MSS., 
of which a separate volume has appeared, to 272. Large numbers of Mohammedan MSS. and 
others in various languages remain to be catalogued. It is obviously of the utmost importance 
that the contents of such storehouses of learning as these libraries should be accurately registered 
and rendered easy of ascertainment ; the drudgery undergone is rewarded not perhaps by kudos, 



ALPHONSE MINGANA xi 

but by the utility of the result. It should be added that those scholars or students who wished 
to make use of the documents whose existence Dr. Mingana had made known invariably found 
him willing to render them all possible assistance. 

Besides the works whose contents have been sketched, the Bibliography which follows shows 
many contributions to theological and Oriental journals, both English and Continental; The 
Royal Asiatic Society frequently relied on him for reviews of books, and the obituary notice of 
the late Mrs. Margoliouth which he contributed to its Journal was warmly appreciated by her 

family and her husband. 

Woodbrooke is one of the group known as the Selly Oak Colleges, and in 1925 their Central 
Council, of which Dr. Edward Cadbury was then Treasurer and soon afterwards became Chairman, 
established a central library. Dr. Cadbury deposited here the manuscripts which Mingana had 
collected for him, naming them, with graceful and appropriate generosity, the Mingana Collection ; 
the development of the collection owes much to the ability and thoroughness of his oversight of 
its administration, and his personal interest was a constant encouragement to Mingana's work. 
In 1932 Dr. Cadbury and his wife gave a new building for the Library, which contains a suite of 
rooms specially designed for the housing and administration of the collection ; Mingana was 
appointed full-time Curator, and removed to Birmingham, where he passed the remaining five 
and a half years of his life. 

Though broken into to some extent by ill-health, they were still years of unceasing work ; 
a steady and unhurried routine filled his days. He took a pleasant house in King's Norton,^ 
couple of miles from the Library, and named it, with characteristic enthusiasm, " Manuscripta ". 
It is not for an outsider to say more of his domestic life than what no outsider could fail to see, 
—how much he owed to the understanding and care of his wife. He became a regular attender 
of the Northfield meeting of the Society of Friends. 

The Colleges of the Selly Oak group are engaged mainly in religious and social education 
in a more practical field than those where Mingana's interests lay ; but his colleagues found in 
him a friendly and sympathetic interest. He was made honorary reader in Oriental Languages 
and Islamics, and lectured on Islam to missionary students. He served on the Senatus of the 
Colleges and on its Library Committee ; and though he did not concern himself with the detail 
of academic administration, he was always watchful lest the claims of pure scholarship should 
be subordinated to the exigencies of teaching, or lest the library funds should be diverted to the 
purchase of ephemeral literature. " It is a book to read in the train," he would say of some 
manual which the students for whom it was intended might find anything but light reading ; and 
he maintained half-seriously that the presence in the Library of Aristotle's De anima made it 
unnecessary to add more recent books on psychology. 

He was always ready to explain his work to others, and knowing its abstruseness had made 
himself a master of the art of simple illustrative analogy. He had none of the vanity which 
conceals vanity, and shared his triumphs joyously and generously with his friends. He disliked, 
and avoided when he could, irrevelant personal publicity ; but he was proud, as he was entitled 
to be, that he was known to the public in connection with his work ; and when he speculated, 



xii MINGANA COLLECTION 

as he liked to, on the number of generations which his work would outlast, it was with the 
impersonal pride of the craftsman. He was, indeed, absorbed in his work with a single-minded 
devotion which excluded any other sustained interest or hobby, but which could not check the 
warm interest with which he was always eager to hear about and discuss the affairs of his friends. 
He could turn from his manuscripts to recommend loaf-sugar for teething babies, and could 
remain completely unoff ended, though by no means silenced, if his advice was rejected ; he could 
tease and nick-name with an unforgettable affectionate gaiety ; he loved to praise his friends ; 
and he rejoiced in their good fortune as if it were his own. 



A. MINGANA : A BIBLIOGRAPHY 

By G. WOLEDGE 
Note.— Offprints and unaltered reprints of articles in periodicals are omitted. 

J %fficium juxta ritum Syrorum Orientalium. 3 volumes. This title occurs in the list furnished by Dr. 
Mingana to Who's Who ; but I have not been able to trace it, and Professors Kahle and Heffemng 
of Bonn and Raes of Rome, who have been so good as answer enquiries, have been equally unsuccessful. 
Professor Raes, however, kindly communicates to me the suggestion, made by a Dominican who was 
formerly at Mosul, that Dr. Mingana may have undertaken editorial work in connection with editions 
published by the Mosul Dominicans of the offices of baptism, of matrimony, and of the dead. 

J9 ° 5 Narsai homili* et carmina. Primo edita cura et studio D. Alphonsi Mingana. Cum pnefatione editoris. 
2 vols., la. 8°. Mausilii, Typis Fratrum Pradicatorum, 1905. 
Preface dated " die XV* Novembris 1904." In " Who's Who " the date is given as 1904-5, but both volumes 
are dated 1905 on the title-page. 

? ^ Response a Mr 1' Abbe J.-B. Chabot a propos de la Chronique de Barhadhbsabba. (Voir Journal Asiatique 
No. Juillet-Aout 1905.) 

8°. [? Mossoul, ? 1905.] 
A reply to a review of the above. 

1905 CM de la langue arameenne, ou Grammaire complete et pratique des deux dialectes syriaques occidental 

et oriental. 

8°. Mossoul, Imprimerie des Peres Dominicains, 1905. 

Preface dated " 9 Octobre, 1905." 

J9 ° 7 Sources syriaques, Vol. I., Pt. 1 : Msiha-Zkha (pp. 1-168). Histoire du convent de Sabriso' (pp. 169- 
271). Pt. 2 : Bar-Penkaye (pp. 1-204). Textes et traductions. 

8° Leipzig, Harrassowitz (pr. Mossoul, Imp. des Peres Dominicains), n.d. 
Prefaces dated " Juin 1907 " and " Janvier 1908." No further volumes appear to have been published ; 
the reference in " Who's Who " to two volumes is rather to the two parts. 

The early development of Mohammedanism. 

[In] The Expository Times, Vol. 25 (No. 7), pp. 37 6 "378 (April, 1914). 

^Leaves from three ancient Qur'ans, possibly Pre-Othmanic. With a list of their variants. Edited by 
A. Mingana and A. S. Lewis. 

8° Cambridge University Press, 1914. 

A new document on Clement of Rome, his relations and his interview with Simon Peter. 
[In] The Expositor, 8th series, Vol. 8 (No. 45), pp. 227-242 (Sept., 1914). 

xiii 



xiv MINGANA COLLECTION 

1914-15 

Quelques mots sur les odes de Salomon. 

[In] Zeitschrift fiir die neutestamentliche Wissenschaft, 15. Jg., pp. 234-253 (1914) ; 10. Jg-> 

pp. 167-190 (1915). 
Dated " Woodbrooke 13.7.13-" 

19x4-1$ 

Lewisian and Curetonian versions of the Gospels. 

[7m] The Expository Times, Vol. 25 (No. 10), pp. 475-477 (July, *9M)> and (No. n), pp. 524-525 
(Aug., 1914) ; Vol. 26 (No. 1), pp. 47-48 (Oct., 1914), (No. 2), pp. 93-94 (Nov., 1914), and 
(No. 5), pp. 235-236 (Feb., 1915). 

Judges xv. 8. 

[In] The Expository Times, Vol. 26 (No. 7), pp. 332-333 (April, 1915)- 

19x5 

An important old Turki manuscript in the John Rylands Library. 

[In] Bulletin of the John Rylands Library. Vol. 2 (No. 2), pp. 129-138 (April, 1915). 
Reprinted in " The Moslem World," Vol. 5 {No. 4), pp. 39 I -39& ( 0ct -> I 9 I 5)- 

1915 

A new document on Christian Monachism. 

[In] The Expositor, 8th series, Vol. 9 (No. 52), pp. 365-378 (April, 1915)- 

Reprinted and criticised in " Gregorii Monachi Cyprii de Theoria sancta, Ed. I, Hausherr," 1937. 

1915 

The remaining Syriac versions of the Gospels. 

[In] The Expository Times, Vol. 26 (No. 8), pp. 379"38i (May, 1915). 

J0T 5 

Notes upon some of the Kuranic manuscripts in the John Rylands Library. 

[In] Bulletin of the John Rylands Library, Vol. 2 (No. 3), pp. 240-250 (July-Sept., 1915). 

1916 

Remarks on the Hebrew of Genesis. 

[In] The Expositor, 8th series, Vol. 11 (No. 64), pp. 303-310 (April, 1916). 

1916 

Syriac versions of the Old Testament , 

[In] The Jewish Quarterly Review (Dropsie College, Philadelphia). New series, Vol 6 (No. 3), 

PP- 385-398 (191 6 ) • 

1916 

The transmission of the Kur'an. 

[In] Journal of the Manchester Egyptian and Oriental Society, 1915-16, pp. 25-47. 

1916 

More sayings attributed to Christ. 

[In] The Expository Times, Vol. 27 (No. 8), p. 383 (May, 1916). 

1916 

Devil-worshippers : their beliefs and their sacred books. 

[In] Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, 1916 (Pt. 3), pp. 505-526 (July, 1916). • 

191 The Odes and Psalms of Solomon. Re-edited for the Governors of the John Rylands Library by Rendel 
Harris and Alphonse Mingana. Vol. 1 : The text with facsimile reproductions. Vol. 2 : The 
translation with introduction and notes. 

2 vols. Sm. 4 . Manchester University Press, 1916 and 1920. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



xv 



'^Vocabularies : English, Arabic, Persian, Turkish, Armenian, Kurdish, Syriac. Compiled on behalf of 
the Admiralty and the War Office, No. 1121. 

8°. [London.] Admiralty War Staff, Intelligence Division, n.d. 
Anonymous ; all except the Armenian by A. Mingana. 
Also subsequently reprinted. 

J %he Odes of Solomon. [Address to the Manchester Egyptian and Oriental Society, i S , HI, 17 1 brief 
report in Journal of the Society, 1916-17, p. 17.] 

J917 

Baghdad and after.^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^^ ^ 9 ^ ^ pp ^.^ (Jan . April| igI?) . 

J9J7 Some early Judaeo-Christian documents in the John Rylands Library. Syriac texts. Edited with 
tran S°BnUetin of the John Rylands Library, Vol. 4 (No. 1), pp. 59-"8 (May-August, 1917). 

'^Editions and varions readings. External evidence for the existence of the Qnr'an. Translations. 
[Sections of article on " Qur'an."] -,„--« 

[In] Hastings' Encyclopaedia of Religion and Ethics. Vol. 10, pp. 547-550. 

J0I 9 . , . 

An6Wl ^] SH^John Rylands Library, Vol. 5 (No, «). pp. ntart (Aug., roro-Ma,, 

1919). 

J9I9 Synopsis of Christian doctrine in the fourth century according to Theodore of Mopsuestia. Edited [or 

^ 1 S^^^S^S^ Library, Vol. 3 (No, 3 and 4), PP- *9^ V***"- **)■ 

r %ew documents on Philoxenus of Hierapolis, and on the Philoxenian version of the Bible. 
[In] The Expositor, 8th series, Vol. 19 (No. no), pp. 149-160 (Feb., 1920). 

J920 

A semi-official defence of Islam. . 

[In] Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, 1920 (Pt. 4), PP- 481-488 (Oct., 1920). 

ig2i 

Sacred books of the Yezidis. . 

[/*] Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, 1921 (Pt. 1), pp. XX7-H9 (J an - I 9 21 )- 



192J 



TReview of] Elementary Kurmanji Grammar, by E. B. Soane. 

L [A] Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, 1921 (Pt. 2), pp. 287-289 (April 1921 

[Review of] Assyrian, Kurdish, and Yezidis. Indexed grammar and vocabulary, by Agl a 1 etros Ellow. 
[In] Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, 1921 (Pt. 2), pp. 290-293 (April, 1921). 

1921 

Marriage and divorce in early Eastern Christianity. 

[In] The Interpreter, Vol. 17 (No. 2), pp. 113-121 (Jan., 1921). 

1921 

Aramaic background of the Synoptists. 

[In] The Expositor, Vol. 22, 8th series (No. 129), 47th year, pp. 230-240. 



xvi MINGANA COLLECTION 

1922 

Baghdad. 

[In] Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, 1922 (Pt. 3), pp. 4 2 9"43° (July, I9 22 )- 
Note on the name of the town Baghdad. . 
1922 

Remarks on the text of the prose refutations of S. Ephrem. 

[In] Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, 1922 (Pt. 4), pp. 5 2 3"53i (Oct., 1922). 

I 9 22 

Brief notes on some of the rarer or unique Arabic and Persian-Arabic manuscripts in the John Rylands 

Library. 

[In] Bulletin of the John Rylands Library, Vol. 6 (No. 4), pp. 5 22 "530 (Jan., 1922). 

1922 

The Book of Religion and Empire. A semi-official defence and exposition of Islam ... by 'Ali Taban. 

Translated with a critical apparatus by A. Mingana. 

8°. Manchester Univ. Press, 1922. 

1923 

The Book of Religion and Empire. A semi-official defence and exposition of Islam ... by 'Ali Taban. 

Arabic text edited ... by A. Mingana. 
8°. Manchester Univ. Press, 1923. 
1923 

The word Ma'une. 

[In] Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, 1923 (Pt. 1), pp. 87-88 (Jan., 1923). 
Note referring to Mingana' s article entitled " Remarks on the text of the prose refutations of S. Ephrem," in 
Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, 1922 {Pt. 4), pp. 523-531 {Oct., 1922). 

1923 

Mosul. Its population and resources. Why the Turks desire it. From a correspondent. 
[In] Manchester Guardian, 2nd January, 1923. 

XQ21 

Syriaque et Nabateen. [Reply to article under this title, criticising Mingana's article Remarks on the 
text of . . . St. Ephrem (1922), by Clermont-Ganneau in J.R.A.S., 1923, pp. 263-264.] 
[In] Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, 1923 (No. 3), pp. 4 I 7"4 I 9 (J ulv » I 9 2 3)- 

1924 

The termination waih in the Persian proper names. 

[In] Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, 1924 (No. 1), pp. 97-98 (Jan., 1924). 

A page of Indian history in 1707-20. From an apparently unique Arabic manuscript in the John Rylands 
Library. 
[In] Bulletin of the John Rylands Library, Vol. 8 (No. 1), pp. 150-165 (Jan., 1924). 
An abridged translation of part of a work by Muhammad Mu'min. 

*9 2 5 

Remarks on Tabari's semi-official defence of Islam. 

[In] Bulletin of the John Rylands Library, Vol. 9 (No. 1), pp. 236-240 (Jan., 1925). 

1925 

An ancient Syriac translation of the Kur'an exhibiting new verses and variants. 

[In] BuUetin of the John Rylands Library, Vol. 9 (No. 1), pp. 188-235 (Jan., 1925). 
Reprinted with additions by the Manchester Univ. Press, 1925. 

192$ 

The early spread of Christianity in Central Asia and the Far East : a new document. 

[In] BuUetin of the John Rylands Library, Vol. 9 (No. 2), pp. 297-371 (July, 1925). 
Reprinted with additions by the Manchester Univ. Press, 1925. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY xvu 

J925 The Kurdish revolt. Against the civilising Turk. From a correspondent. 
[In] The Manchester Guardian, 27th February, 1925. 

1925 A charter of protection granted to the Nestorian Church in A.D. 1138 by Mnktafi II, CaUph of Baghdad. 

Ed ^BnUeS The John Ryiands Library, Vol. ro (No. x), pp. »M33 (Jan., 1&). 

Published as a Preprint by the Manchester Univ. Press, 1925. 

1926 

The early spread of Christianity in India. ,. 

[J*] Bulletin of the John Rylands Library, Vol. 10 (No. 2), pp. 435-514 (July. 1920). 

1926 Ust of the Turkish governors and high judges of Aleppo ^^.°*^3^. to ^ I747> 
[/»] Bulletin of the John Rylands Library, Vol. 10 (No. 2), pp. 515-523 (July, I9»)- 

1927 

Syriac influence on the style of the Kur'an. 

[7n] Bulletin of the John Rylands Library, Vol. 11 (No. 1), pp. 77"98 (Jan., !&). 

1927 

Kitab-ud-Dm Wa-d-Danl^ ^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ pp ^ ^ ^ 

i4 note ow V4Zt Tabari. 
192 Woodbrooke Studies. Christian documents in Syriac, Arabic and Garshuni, edited and translated . . . 
by A. Mingana. With introductions by Rendel Harris. Vol. 1. 

1. Barsalibi's treatise against the Melchites. 

2. Genuine and apocryphal works of Ignatius of Antioch. 

3. A Jeremiah apocryphon. 

4. A new life of John the Baptist. 

5. Some uncanonical Psalms. 

Originally pubUsheTin Butun^foln lyLds Library, Vol. XI, pp. no-231 and 329-498 (1**). 

192 Woodbrooke Studies. Christian documents in Syriac, Arabic, and Garshuni, edited and translated . . . 
by A. Mingana With two introductions by Rendel Harris. Vol. 2. 

1. Timothy's apology for Christianity. 

2. The lament of the Virgin. 

3. The martyrdom of Pilate. 

La. 8°. Cambridge, Heffer, 1928. . « 

Originally published in Bulletin of the John Rylands Library, Vol. 12, pp. 137-298 and 4x1-580 (1928). 

1928 

Garshuni or Karshuni ? _ /n . m 

[In] Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, 1928 (Pt. 4), PP- 891-893 (Oct., 1928). 

1929 

Intr0dUC [/ n] Manual of the Aramaic language of the Palestinian Talmud, by J. T. Marshall. Edited 
... by J. Barton Turner 
8°. Leyden, Brill, 1929. 

1929 

The Nestorian church. /T _...\ 

[7n] International Review of Missions, Vol. 18 (No. 69), pp. 131-134 U an - I 9 2 9)- 

Review of " Nestorian missionary enterprise," by J. Stewart, 
b 



xviii MINGANA COLLECTION 

• 

1930 

The authorship of the Fourth Gospel. 

[In] Bulletin of the John Rylands Library, Vol. 14 (No. 2), pp. 333-339 (J ulv > I 93 )- 

1930 . . . 

The genuineness of at-Tabari's Arabic " Apology " and the Syriac document on the spread of Christianity 

in Central Asia, in the John Rylands Library. By H. Guppy and A. Mingana. 

[In] Bulletin of the John Rylands Library, Vol. 14 (No 1), pp. 121-124 (Jan., 1930). 

Mingana' s contribution consists of a note entitled " Remarks on the early spread of Christianity in Central 

Asia." 

1931 

Biblical gleanings from the forthcoming catalogue of my collection of Syriac manuscripts. 

[In] Bulletin of the John Rylands Library, Vol. 15 (No. 1), pp. 177-178 (Jan., 1931). 

I93i 

The Christian Apocrypha. 

[In] Memoirs and Proceedings of the Manchester Literary and Philosophical Society, Vol. 75 
(Session 1930-31), pp. 61-75 (May, 1931). 

I 93 I 

Woodbrooke Studies. Christian documents in Syriac, Arabic, and Garshuni, edited and translated . . . 

by A. Mingana. Vol. 3. 

1. Vision of Theophilus. 

2. Apocalypse of Peter. 

La. 8°. Cambridge, Heffer, 1931. 
Originally published in Bulletin of the John Rylands Library, Vol. 13, pp. 3^3-474 { x 9 2 9) i and Vo1 - J 4> 
pp. 182-297 {1930). 
1931 

Woodbrooke Studies. Christian documents in Syriac, Arabic, and Garshuni, edited and translated . . . 
by A. Mingana. Vol. 4. The work of Dionysius Barsalibi against the Armenians. 
La. 8°. Cambridge, Heffer, 1931. 
Originally published in Bulletin of the John Rylands Library, Vol. 15, pp. 179-279 (JQJ-r). 
1932 

Mysticism, early and recent. 

[In] International Review of Missions, Vol. 21 (No. 33), pp. 132-134 (J an -» *932). 
Review of " Studies in early mysticism in the near and middle east," by Margaret Smith, and " B aha' ism, its 
origin, history and teachings," by William McElwee Miller. 

1932 

Woodbrooke Studies. Christian documents in Syriac, Arabic, and Garshuni, edited and translated . . . 
by A. Mingana. Vol. 5. Commentary of Theodore of Mopsuestia on the Nicene Creed. 
La. 8°. Cambridge, Heffer, 1932. 

1933 

A 12th-century map of the heavens. 

[In] Manchester Guardian, 21st February, 1933. [Reprinted in] Manchester Guardian Weekly, 
3rd March, 1933. 

1933 

A note on the work of Theodore of Mopsuestia, " Ad Baptizandos." 

[In] The Expository Times, Vol. 44 (No. 6), p. 285 (March, 1933). 

1933 

Note on Barsalibi's controversial works. 

[In] Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, 1933 (Pt. 2), pp. 491-492 (April). 
Reply to a review of " Woodbrooke Studies, Vol. 4," by C. Moss, in Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, 1933- 
{Pt. 1), pp. 232-236 {Jan., 1933)' 



BIBLIOGRAPHY xix 

1933 

Catalogue of the Mingana Collection of Manuscripts. Vol. 1. Syriac and Garshuni Manuscripts. 

4 . Cambridge, Heffer, 1933. 

Woodbrooke Studies. Christian documents edited and translated ... by A. Mingana. Vol. 6. 

Commentary of Theodore of Mopsuestia on the Lord's Prayer and on the sacraments of Baptism and 
the Eucharist. 

La. 8°. Cambridge, Heffer, 1933. 

1933 

[Review of] The eclipse of Christianity in Asia, by L. E. Browne. 

[In] International Review of Missions, Vol. 23 (No. 92), pp. 580-581 (Oct., 1934)- 

1934 

Catalogue of the Arabic Manuscripts in the John Rylands Library, Manchester. 

4 . Manchester Univ. Press, 1934. 

T95 Voodbrooke Studies. Christian documents in Syriac, Arabic, and Garshuni, edited and translated . . . 
by A. Mingana. Vol. 7. Early Christian Mystics. 

1. Medico-mystical work, by Simon of Taibutheh. 

2. Treatise on solitude and prayer, by Dadisho' Katraya. 

3 Treatises on the workings of the Grace, etc., by 'Abdisho' Hazzaya. 

4. Treatise on the shortest path that brings us near to God, by Joseph Hazzaya. 

5. Treatise on Eremitism, by Abraham bar Dashandad. 

La. 8°. Cambridge, Heffer, 1934. 

1934 

Tessie Payne Margoliouth. 

[In] Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, 1934 (Pt. 1), pp. 217-219 (Jan., 1934). 

Obituary notice. 

^Review of] Les Arabes Chretiens de Mesopotamie et de Syrie du Vile au VHIe siecle. Par Francois Nau. 
[In] Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, 1935 (Pt. x), PP- 185-186 (Jan., 1935). 

'^Review of] Zur Ostsyrischen Laut- und Akzentlehre, von Theodor Weiss 

[In] Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, 1935 (Pt- l), PP- 186-188 (Jan., 1935). 

Encyclopedia of philosophical and natural sciences as taught in Baghdad about a^d. 817, or Book of 
Treasures, by Job of Edessa. Syriac text edited and translated ... by A. Mingana. Vol. 1 of 
Woodbrooke Scientific Publications. 
La. 8°. Cambridge, Heffer, 1935. 

1935 

Treasures from ancient dustheaps. 

[In] The Friend, Vol. 93 (No. 48), p. 1091 (29th Nov., 1935). 

^Review of] The Malabar Syrians and the Church Missionary Society, 1 816-1840, by P. Cheriyan. 
[In] The East and West Review, Vol. 2 (No. 1), pp. 181-183 (Jan., 1936). 

1936 

An important manuscript of the Traditions of Bukhan. 

4 . Cambridge, Heffer, 1936.- 

Catalogue of the Mingana Collection of Manuscripts. Vol. 2. Christian Arabic Manuscripts and Addi- 
tional Syriac Manuscripts. 

4 . Cambridge, Heffer, 1936. 



xx MINGANA COLLECTION 

1936 

An important MS. of Bukhara's Sahlh. 

[In] Journal of the Royai Asiatic Society, 1936 (Pt. 2), pp. 49 I "49 2 (April, 1936). 

1936 

[Review of] Elenco dei Manoscritti Arabi Islamici della Biblioteca Vaticana. By Giorgio Levi della Vida. 
[In] Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, 1936 (Pt. 4), p. 709 (Oct., 1936). 

x 93& 

MSS. from the Sinai Library. History of the lost fragments. To the Editor of The Times. 

[In] The Times, 6th November, 1936. 

1937 

Arabic numerals. 

[In] Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, 1937 (Pt. 2), pp. 315-316 (April, 1937). 



NOTE 

This third volume of the Catalogue was left almost ready for the press by Dr. Mingana when he died. Professor 
D. S. Margoliouth and Mr. Woledge » undertook the responsibility of seeing it through the press, and besides 
this, jointly wrote the biography of Dr. Mingana. Mr. Woledge also prepared the Bibliography. Dr. H. L. 
Gottschalk, the present Curator of the Mingana Collection of Oriental MSS., undertook the last revision of 
the proofs, and compiled both the Subject Index to the Syriac MSS. and the General Index to the third volume. 

The Catalogue itself is the unaltered work of Dr. Mingana. 

■Dr. Mingana found the Library marks and other clear statements of ownership of the Convent of S. 
Catharine on Mount Sinai on a number of Christian Arabic MSS., which are described in the following list :— 



Number. 


Leaves 


121 


3 


126 


1 


137 


2 


140 


6 


144 


2 


145 


1 


149 


1 


151 


2 


153 


9 


ESQ 


6 



Number. 


Leaves 


160 


22 


162 


3 


176 


1 


178 


I 


179 


2 


181 


I 


184 


2 


187 


I 


189 


2 


IQ3 


2 



Number. 


Leaves 


194 


I 


209 


2 


210 


I 


211 


I 


212 


I 


2l6 


I 


217 


I 


219 


I 


220 


I 


221 


I 



Number. 


Leaves 


226 


I 


242 


I 


243 


8 


248 


2 


263 


1 


264 


1 


265 


1 


266 


1 


267 


1 


270 


1 



Dr. Mingana was also convinced that the Syriac MSS. Nos. 628-662 came from Mount Sinai. 

Professor Margoliouth, Mr. Woledge and Dr. Gottschalk tried, with little success, to identify these fragments 
with the MSS. described in the catalogues of Mrs. Gibson and Mrs. Lewis. 2 As regards the Arabic MSS., it 
can be proved that the fragments were taken away from the Convent before Mrs. Gibson and- Mrs. Lewis 
visited it. No. 212 in our Catalogue is a work by Evagrius, with a clear waqf inscription to Mount Sinai, but 
there is no mention of Evagrius in the index of Mrs. Gibson's catalogue. 

The Collection is housed in the Library of the Selly Oak Colleges, Birmingham, 29. 

1 Formerly Librarian, Selly Oak Colleges, Birmingham, now Librarian, The Queen's University, Belfast. 

« Lewis AS-" Catalogue of the Syriac MSS. in the Convent of S. Catharine on Mount Sinai," Studia Smaitica No. I, 
1894 ; Gibson, M. D. : '* Catalogue of the Arabic MSS. in the Convent of S. Catharine on Mount Sinai," Studia Sinatttca No. 
Ill, 1894. 



xxi 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Alphonse Mingana, 1881-1937. By D. S. Margoliouth and G. Woledge v 

A. Mingana : A Bibliography. By G. Woledge. ........... xiii 

Note ................... xxi 

Contents xxiii 

Introductory Note xxv 

Catalogue of Christian Arabic MSS., continued from Vol. II. 

I. Bible 1 

II. Psalters 5 

III. Commentaries 6 

IV. Apocrypha ............... 9 

V. Prayer-Books and Service Books 10 

VI. Theology and Theological History 19 

VII. Mysticism 35 

VIII. Philosophy 43 

IX. Science • • • • 44 

X. History 44 

XI. Miscellanea 56 

Catalogue of Syriac MSS., continued from Vols. I and II 63 

List of Dated and Undated MSS. written before 1798 *°3 

Concordance of Catalogue Numbers and Shelf Numbers of the Christian Arabic MSS. described 

in Vols. II and III I0 7 

General Index to Vol. III. By H. L. Gottschalk IX 3 

Subject Index to the Syriac MSS. in Vols. I, II and III. By H. L. Gottschalk .... 121 



xxm 



INTRODUCTORY NOTE. 

It is a source of gratification that only a year after the publication, in 1936, of the Catalogue 
of the Christian Arabic and additional Syriac manuscripts of my collection, a sufficient number 
of new manuscripts in both these languages should have been acquired to make a supplementary 
volume necessary. The Christian Arabic section is arranged, as in the second volume, according 
to subject-matter, while the Syriac manuscripts are described, as in the first volume and the 
Appendix to the second volume, in the order of the numbers they bear on the. shelves of my 
collection. The reason for this may be found in the Introductory Note to the first volume. 

As in the previous volumes it has not been my aim to compare the contents of the manu- 
scripts with similar ones which may be preserved in the libraries of Europe and the Near East, 
nor to specify the library, church, or early private collection from which they emanate. I may 
state in general terms, however, that the manuscripts described in this volume come from Egypt, 
Palestine Syria, and the Sinai Peninsula. I have faithfully reproduced in the catalogue any 
indications found in the manuscripts themselves which may throw light on the history of their 
origin, but beyond this I did not go. 

Many features distinguish this volume from the two preceding ones.: 
In point of age the present volume contains more ancient manuscripts than those described 
in the first two volumes. It may even be stated that in Syriac and Christian Arabic, the volume 
contains some of the oldest writings on vellum that have come down to us. So in Christian 
Arabic we have, No. 165, an Arabic palimpsest the underwriting of which may be ascribed to 
about a.d. 770, the earliest date to which a Christian Arabic manuscript may be ascribed with 
safety This is closely followed by No. 141, which may go back to about a.d. 800. Many other 
manuscripts may be ascribed to the ninth century, such as Nos. 131. 142, 231, 165 (upper- 
writing), 166, 167, 168, 232, 169, 204, 170, and 233. Many others may be dated back to the 
tenth century, such as Nos. 134, 234, W, 135, 205, 229, 235, 236, 237, and 145. There are not 
many libraries in the world that have so many different items in Christian Arabic written before 

A ' D ' The°antiquity of the manuscripts is even more strikingly illustrated by the Syriac collection, 
where we have No. 629, which was written about a.d. 400-450. This is closely followed by No 
653 a palimpsest the under-writing of which goes back to about a.d. 450-500 ; No. 628 of about 
ad. 500 ; No. 632 of about a.d. 500-530 ; No. 630 of about a.d. 550 ; and No. 659 (palimpsest) 



XXV 



' 



xxvi MINGANA COLLECTION 

of about a.d. 600. The seventh century is represented by the two dated inscriptions found in 
No. 632 ; by Nos.. 638, 644, 651 and 652 ; and by the under-writing of the Arabic manuscript 
No. 164. The eighth century is represented by Nos. 643, 646, 648, 640, 631, 662, and 637 
(palimpsest). The collection is particularly rich in palimpsests, of which it possesses eleven 
items, which are : Arabic, Nos. (Arab.) 165, 208 ; Greek, Nos. (Arab.) 171, 141, 136, 144 ; 
Armenian, No. (Arab.) 166 ; Coptic, No. (Arab.) 141 ; Syriac, Nos. (Syr.) 653, 659, and (Arab.) 
164 ; Palestinian Syriac, No. (Syr.) 637. My Syriac collection did not contain hitherto any 
Maronite manuscripts. The Syriac manuscripts Nos. 623, 624, 625 and 626 are, therefore, 
particularly welcome. 

Apart from the question of age, there is no need here to draw attention to the importance 
of all the items described in the volume. Special value, however, attaches to No. (Syr.) 
662, of about a.d. 800, which contains a document dealing with Graeco-Roman history and 
mythology. The manuscript is unfortunately incomplete, and must have been voluminous. 
Another item of importance is that described under No. (Syr.) 639, which is unique of its kind, 
and exhibits the Apocryphal work known as Acta Pilati. A fragment only of the second part of 
this Apocryphon was hitherto known to exist in Syriac, while the first part of the text 
is apparently not found elsewhere. A third item of importance is that exhibited in No. (Arab.) 
167, a vellum manuscript of about a.d. 850, which contains the beginning of an Apocryphal 
discourse attributed to John the Evangelist, on the miracles that took place at the death of 
the Virgin. 

I have often noticed that the older a Syriac manuscript of the Old Testament Peshitta is, 
the more important are its variants and the differences in its phraseology as compared with the 
more recent manuscripts and printed texts. This feature, which does not apply to the Peshitta 
version of the New Testament, is emphasised by No. (Syr.) 628, of about a.d. 500, which may 
almost be said to exhibit a new text of the Song of Solomon. 1 

Many items represent the oldest text in existence of their particular works. As such may 
be counted : — 

In Syriac. — -No. 652, a vellum manuscript of about a.d. 670, which contains one of the 
earliest Syriac works on zoology ; No. 643, a vellum manuscript of about a.d. 700, which contains 
the earliest extant text of the famous work of the Paradise of the Fathers by 'Enanisho' ; and No. 
627, a vellum manuscript of about a.d. 900, which contains the earliest East Syrian Massorah 
for the New Testament, in the same way as its counterpart and contemporary manuscript Add. 
12,138 of the British Museum does for the Old Testament. 

In Arabic. — No. 141, a vellum manuscript of about a.d. 800, which contains. the earliest 
Arabic version of the Acta Pilati; No. 131, a vellum manuscript of about a.d. 830, containing 
the beginning of the Psalter, in which the Qur'anic names Taltit and Jalut are used for Saul and 
Goliath ; No. 232, a vellum manuscript of about a.d. 850-880, which contains the Arabic version 
of the martyrdom of St. George under the king Dadyanus ; No. 204, a vellum manuscript of 

1 1 described another MS. exhibiting this feature in The Jewish Quarterly Review for 1916 (New Series, Volume VI. 
number 3, pp. 385-398). 






INTRODUCTORY NOTE xxvii 

about a.d. 850-900, which contains the beginning of a discourse by St. Ephrem on the fact that 
a monk should never smile nor rejoice ; No. 233, a vellum manuscript of about a.d. 880-900, 
containing an anecdote about Peter, bishop of Sebaste, and a visit paid to him by his brother 
St. Basil of Cassarea ; No. 239, a vellum manuscript dated a.d. 928 and containing the end of the 
life of the emperor Jovian, in connection with a miracle performed on a sick girl ; No. 236, a 
manuscript of about a.d. 950, containing the beginning of the martyrdom of St. Natolius (or 
Anatolius), who was martyred under Diocletian ; No. 237, a vellum manuscript of about a.d. 
950, which contains an account of the conversion of the Jews in Ifriqiyah and Cartagena in the 
time of Heraclius, emperor of Constantinople ; No. 147, a vellum manuscript of about a.d. 
1050, which contains part of the Synaxarium of the Greek Church ; No. 259, a vellum manuscript 
of about a.d. 1050-1100, which exhibits the oldest text of the famous astrological work attributed 
in both Islamic and Christian literature to Daniel the Prophet ; No. 182, a manuscript of about 
a.d. 1250, containing the well-known theological work of questions by a pupil and answers by 
a teacher ; and No. 188, a manuscript dated a.d. 1334 and containing the theological work of 
the Coptic writer SafI ibn al-'Assal. 

A considerable number of the manuscripts consist of one or two leaves. Many of these 
leaves seem to have been culled from ancient manuscripts preserved in the libraries of the Near 
East, as they often contain either the beginning or the end of a manuscript. Some men are 
known to have indulged in this practice of culling leaves from ancient manuscripts, among whom 
—to mention only one— was Porfiri Uspenski, referred to by C. R. Gregory in his Canon and 
Text of the New Testament, p. 381. 

I did not devote a special study to each palimpsest, nor did I attempt to read their under- 
writing methodically and thoroughly. I left this work for another and more propitious time. 
During almost the whole of 1937 I was stricken with a severe illness, and since the catalogue 
was, but for these palimpsests, ready for the press, I decided to have it printed and to omit for 
the present those parts of the work which called for particularly arduous and detailed study. 

The abbreviation Catalogue, Vol. I or Vol. II, as the case may be, refers to Volumes I or II 
of the Catalogue of the Mingana Collection of Manuscripts, published in 1933 and 1936 respectively. 

As in the second volume, the numbers between square brackets in the Christian Arabic section 
refer to the numbers of the manuscripts as they stand on the shelves of my collection. 

A word of thanks is here due to Mr. J. Enoch Powell, of Trinity College, Cambridge, for help 
in dating the Greek palimpsests Nos. (Arab.) 171, 144, *4* and 136 ; to Dr. W. E. Crum for 
dating the Coptic part of No. (Arab.) 141 ; and to Mr. A. G. Ellis for dating the Armenian 
palimpsest No. (Arab.) 166. 

Words expressing more than ordinary thanks are due to Mr. Edward Cadbury, who has 
defrayed the cost of the present catalogue, as he did in the case of the two preceding ones. I 
am confident that all those engaged in theological and Oriental researches will share in my 
gratitude to him for his continued encouragement and interest in my publications. 

A. MINGANA. 

Manuscripta, 

King's Norton, 

15th November, 1937. 



CATALOGUE OF ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC 
MANUSCRIPTS OF THE MINGANA COLLECTION 

i 

BIBLE 

121 

207 x 132 mm. 3 leaves. Different lines to the page. 

The leaves were probably culled from a MS. of the monastery of Mount Sinai. 

Fol. 1 : The title-page of the six Sapiential Books of the Old Testament, or, as the writer 
puts it, " six Books out of sixty in the canon of the Bible." These Books are : Proverbs of 
Solomon, his Wisdom, Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs, Job, and Ecclesiasticus. 

V>L I V 15" Ul cij .<>Ju- ^ oiii .^Ul ^~~r ^ ^ ^ ^Jj ^>y j*-> *~^ <: ^ 

.^^r- J> fj-t ^^ Xi/'i 3-^ 

Fol. 2 : The beginning of the Proverbs of Solomon. 
dUJI *jb j, j^Ju- <*5^ V 15" frjS IjJ ,U£ ^5 ^ y>.j 4U.> *jb ji C >X- >- . . . v^VI p-. 

.^1531 II* J t> JL- w^li Vjl v^ .<2U^- oil o y^l £>Vj .4lUj 

The extant text contains only the introduction to the Book of Proverbs. 
On fol. 36 : Ecclesiasticus ends with the following subscription : 

•jr~- <y. il-c -1 <y. &?*•*- -M- ^ u J*" 

No date. A Christian Kufi hand of about a.d. 950. Headings in red. The last leaf was 

wrongly bound with No. 254. 

b J [Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 199.] 

122 

261 x 176 mm. 4 leaves. Thirteen lines to the page. 

They contain a lectionary from the Old Testament according to the Greek Orthodox Church. 

Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. The heading on fol. 2a is : 

No date. A slightly bold Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1500. Headings in red. WeU rubri- 

cated * [Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 211.] 

1 



2 MINGANA COLLECTION 

123 

203 x 157 mm. 36 leaves. Thirteen lines to the page. A lectionary of the Coptic 
Church. 

The lessons are from the Old and the New Testament, and extend from Good Friday to the 
Eve of Easter Sunday. 

Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. 

No date. Written in a clear Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1500. Headings in red. Well 
rubricated. Folios numbered in Coptic numerals. Something is missing between ff. 18-19 
and 27-28. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 262.] 

124 

100 x 77 mm. 8 leaves. Thirteen or fourteen lines to the page. Vellum. 
The Gospel of St. Matthew, from vih. 4 to x. 37. 

Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. 

The Gospel is divided into lessons to be recited for the ecclesiastical festivals and com- 
memorations. 

The headings of the lessons are in red, and in the body of the text, and sometimes at the 
top of the page. 

The lessons are : — 

Fol. 16 : The 6th Sunday after Pentecost (l J ^J\ j*. ^Ul j^VI). 

Fol. 26 : The 7th Sunday after Pentecost. 

Fol. 36 : The 8th Sunday after Pentecost. 

The heading on fol. 6a reads : " It is read on the 30th June, for the commemoration of the 
Apostles." 

Fol. j a : Holy martyrs. 

Fol. 8b : Holy monks. 

The name of Jesus is always written £j~, 1 

The word for Apostles is ^Ju. , which is derived from the Syriac ) -\j i 

No date. Written on thick vellum in an early Christian Naskhi hand bordering on Kufi, 
of about a.d. 1000. Headings in red. Well rubricated. Some letters that had become some- 
what dim have been blackened by a later hand. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 155.] 

125 

252 x 164 mm. 1 leaf. Eighteen lines to the page. 
The leaf contains a lectionary from the Gospels. 

The lesson found in it is that of Wednesday of the 5th week, apparently in Lent (John vi. 
5 _I 4)- 



ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 3 

No date. A clear and bold Naskhi hand of about a.d. iioo. Headings in red. Sections 

marked by a red circle with a black dot in the middle. I altered the position of the leaf, which 

had been misplaced by the binder. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 177.] 

126 

222 x 152 mm. 1 leaf. Five lines only. 

A leaf culled from a MS. of the monastery of Mount Sinai, which contained the Gospels. 

On it is an inscription by Germanus, bishop of the monastery of Mount Sinai, who testifies 
that the MS. is a waqf to the monastery of Mount Sinai, and that nobody is allowed to remove 
it or to remove this inscription, under pain of having the fate of Judas. 

From No. 149 [228] we know that the above Germanus lived in a.d. 1334. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 197.] 

127 

216 x 136 mm. 1 leaf. Fifteen lines to the page. 

The leaf was culled from a MS. of the Gospels, and contains Matt. ix. 19-35. 
The chapters in the MS. from which the leaf is derived must have been rather short, as the 
sixteen verses included in it represent three different chapters numbered as 16-18. 
Jesus is spelt py->\ 

No date. A bold Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1400. Headings in red. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 222.] 

128 

259 x 172 mm. 1 leaf. Twenty lines to the page. 

The leaf was culled from a MS. containing the lessons from the Pauline Epistles to the 
Galatians and Ephesians, as used in the ecclesiastical year of the Greek Orthodox Church. 
The lessons are followed by a commentary, introduced, by the words : -r J»JI J 15 

No date. A clear Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1500. Headings in red. Well rubricated. 

A palseographical feature which distinguishes this MS. from many others is that the letter 

Kaf, in whatever form written and wherever occurring, has always the mark resembling Hamza 

over it. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 257.] 

129 

218 x 163 mm. 187 leaves. Generally fifteen or sixteen lines to the page. 
The four Gospels. 

Incomplete at the end. The text breaks off with John xix. 21, and so all the verses included 
in xix. 21-xxi. 25 are missing. Nine leaves are also missing at the beginning, 4 between ff. 1-2, 
14 between ff. 5-6, 2 between ff. 20-21, 3 between ff. 58-59, 1 between ff. 114-115, 7 between 
ff. 125-126, and 1 between ff. 156-157. 



4 MINGANA COLLECTION 

Ff. 1-43 : Matthew, with the following colophon, in which it is stated that Matthew wrote 
his Gospel in Palestine, eight years after the Ascension : 

.j\jL> <LiUi «~~Jl pj~ > liij *yu* Juu jbJi& ^j\ I4J0 l £j\ JyJ\ J~* ,j^~ »->**£•» ^_}r 
Ff. 436-820 : AfaWe. 
**%* $j, J^VI (jij* t^jU (j^J^JI J>-Jl ^jlJ*^ v"^ * J ^*. £****•. ^-^ 0~^-> <i^ r ^ ^" ^"^ 

In the colophon it is stated that Mark wrote his Gospel in Latin (not in Greek) in the city 
of Rome, twelve years after the Ascension, and in the fourth year of the Emperor Claudius : 

Ff . 826-140^ : Lw&e. 

.j\*l .ULm jj£r cS"ji yblUl J. A/ 1 j~sJI y a--- 1 ^ ° J ^*' ; ' :c '~* , • ****y cr*^-? ^ ^J". ^ a V 

In the colophon it is stated that Luke was a physician, and that he wrote in Greek in 
Macedonia, twenty-two years after the Ascension, and in the fourteenth year of the reign of the 
Emperor Claudius : 

Ff. 140&-188& : John. 

.<>1 .J.V1 Jl 

The Arabic version represented in the MS. seems to be under the influence of both the Greek 
text and the Syriac version. Some proper names are derived from Syriac and some others from 
Greek. The translator used here and there the marginal glosses of some MSS. as part of his 
text. So in John xviii. I (fol. 1846) " the brook of Cedron " is for him " the brook of the cedars " 
(jjVl (3.^). So also in Matthew xix. 9 (fol. 18a) the sentence "whosoever shall put away his 

wife, except it be for adultery, and shall marry another, committeth adultery " is given as : 
" whosoever shall put away his wife, saving for the cause of adultery, induceth her to commit 
adultery" (Ujl Jl UU-I jjii lij ijT ^ j* *s\y\ j&> ( y). (Cf. Matthew v. 32, with which the 

translator evidently wished to harmonise the present text.) 

The chapter numbering used in the MS. is as follows : Matthew, 101 chapters ; Mark, 54 ; 
Luke, 86 ; John breaks of with chapter 41. This numbering is exactly as in MSS. Nos. 3 and 4 
of Catalogue, vol. ii., pp. 7-9. 

No date. Written in a clear, fairly bold, but not handsome Egyptian Naskhi hand of 
about a.d. 1580. Folios numbered in Coptic numerals, and sub-sections marked on the margins 
also in Coptic numerals. Headings in red. Well rubricated. Fairly broad margins. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 271.] 



.Jui 



ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 5 

130 

292 x 204 mm. 1 leaf. Twenty-one lines to the page. 

The leaf is culled from a complete lectionary from the Gospels. It contains Mark xv. 2-31. 

A strange feature exhibited in the text is that the lessons begin with the formula jUjll dUS j , 

" at that time." . 

No date. A clear Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1600. Rubricated. Both red and green inks 

freely used. [Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 229.] 



II 
PSALTERS 

131 

164 x 128 mm. 1 leaf. Nineteen lines to the page. Vellum. 
The beginning of the Psalter. 

It is strange that the words " Saul " and " Goliath " are expressed by the Qur'anic names 
Talut (o>)U>) and Jalut (o^U). 

The MS. contains only the first, the second, and the beginning of the third Psalm. 

A little less strange only is the use of the word mushaf, to express the book of the Psalms, or 
Psalter. It is a word generally used for the Qur'an. In the Qur'an itself the Psalter is called 

zabur. , . , . 

The title or the occasion of the composition of each Psalm is written in red before the hist 

verse. So the 3rd Psalm has the heading : 

It is remarkable that in this heading the title should be : " The 3rd Psalm, by David when he 
was pursued by Saul," the word used being the Qur'anic Talut, spoken of above, as all the MSS. 
which I have consulted, as well as the printed Hebrew, Septuagint and Synac texts, have 
" Absalom " instead of " Saul." 

The first Psalm begins : 

.JJJIj j^fi\ J& <-y^ J^ •*>» t>jSi vJ 1 
To my knowledge this is the oldest specimen of the Arabic translation of the Old Testament 

that has come down to us in MS. form. 

No date. Written in an early Christian Run hand of about a.d. 830. Headings in red, 

and verses separated by red dots. Many diacritical points. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 137.] 



6 MINGANA COLLECTION 

132 

177 x 117 mm. 4 leaves. Twelve lines to the page. 
A fragment of the Psalter according to the Greek Orthodox Church. 
The Psalms represented are : xviii. 9-50 and xix. 1-9. 

No date. A bold Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1300. Leaves numbered in Greek as 24-27. 
I altered the order of the leaves, which had been misplaced by the binder. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 183.] 

133 

149 x 106 mm. 3 leaves. Varying number of lines to the page. Vellum. 
A fragment of the Psalter, according to the Greek Orthodox Church. 

Incomplete at the beginning and at the end, and a lacuna between ff . 1-2. 

The Psalms included are xxxviii., beginning of xxxix., end of xlv., xlvi., and xlvii. 

No date. Clear but not handsome Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1550. Headings in red. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 161.] 



Ill 
COMMENTARIES 

134 

215 x 166 mm. 5 leaves. Twenty lines to the page. Vellum. 

A commentary on some Biblical pericopes dealing mostly with the passages in the New 
Testament where St. Peter is mentioned, with the words of the Apostle Paul, " I will pray with 
the spirit and I will pray with the understanding also " (1 Cor. xiv. 15), and with the Ark of Noah 
m the Old Testament. 

The work is in the form of a written word addressed direct to an audience either of hearers 
or of readers. So the writer often says : " Now I will convince you " (^1 jVI), or " If anyone 
asks, ' How will you convince me ? * I will answer " ( tS Lisr (sic) ju* J. 15 JU Ji). 

The work is incomplete both at the beginning and "at the end" The first extant words are : 

and the last words are : 

It is strange that the word " fish " is expressed by the word jUJ , from the Syriac tfoj . 
he word for " ark " is &J: 



ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 7 

One of the points made by the author is that, as all the animals, whether carnivorous or 
herbivorous, and whether great or small, that were in the Ark of Noah, which was the emblem 
of the Church, had one kind of food, so also all Christians, whether of high or of low estate, are 
equal and eat of one kind of food, while they are in the Church. 

No date. Written in an early Christian Kim hand of about a.d. 900. Many diacritical 
points. No rubrications. Folios numbered in Coptic numerals, from 10 to 14. I altered the 
position of fol. 5, which had been misplaced by the binder. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 141.] 

135 

179 x 138 mm. 1 leaf. Ten lines to the page. 

A fragment from a MS. containing homilies on some verses of the New Testament. 

The leaf contains the beginning of the thirteenth homily, as follows : 

j r , Jyi >Cr JI *y* cJuol tfJMj iJ-^J 3^ 411 cil oV U.j £^1 Jy j» ~°j^ tfUl <lLJl 

No date. An early Egyptian Naskhi hand, resembling that used on papyri, of about 

a.d. 950. Headings in thick black characters, and important sections separated by four black 

dots, in the middle of which is a fifth red dot, surrounded with yellow. Diacritical points often 

missing. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 163.] 

136 

155 x 120 mm. 

A fragmentary leaf of vellum. Palimpsest, of which the upper-writing is in Arabic and the 
under-writing in Greek. 

UPPER-WRITING 

A part of a Biblical commentary. The sentence commented upon is : "He delivered 
Jerusalem " (Isaiah xxxi. 5 ?) (f^jjl o*^-)- 

The leaf seems to be the last of a MS., as the copyist is asking for the mercy of God for the 

scribe and the reader : 

•it 1 *r^ y f-^ ^ J 
No date. Egyptian Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1100. 

UNDER-WRITING 

The Greek writing is hopelessly effaced, and cannot be identified. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 127.] 

137 

261 x 165 mm. 2 leaves. Sixteen lines to the page. 

The leaves exhibit the index to a MS. of the monastery of Mount Sinai containing the com- 
mentary of John Chrysostom on the Gospel of St. John. 



8 MINGANA COLLECTION 

i*-j ^ ^jtJJl *> lis-^i ^^ W 9 -^ ^ oUaJI^ oVlsJl ^» yl^ll lift j U ^ Ulji i-^ . . . 

See No. 1 2 of Catalogue, vol. ii., p. 17. The matter contained in the present index corresponds 
with that on ff. 142-216, representing maqalahs and 'izahs 45-72 of this No. 1 2. The present index 
is therefore incomplete at the end. 

At the top of fol. la is an inscription by Sim'an (Simon), bishop of the monastery of Mount 
Sinai, in which it is stated that the MS. was transcribed for the monks of that monastery. From 
Nos. 211 [214] and 243 [234] we know that this bishop Simon lived towards the beginning of 
the thirteenth Christian century. 

No date. A bold Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1215. Headings in red. References to leaves 
in Coptic numerals. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 217.] 

138 

216 x 140 mm. 1 leaf. Sixteen lines to the page. 

It contains the beginning of a commentary on the lectionary from the Pauline Epistles, 
by 'Abdallah b. Fadl a. Fath al-Antaki, who died in a.d. 1052. 

Begins : 1* IajZ* ^3 *sj[s. Ijjb U Ji«ll ^,1 4JI j^c «:a]I ^.1 JJtfl ^Lill JU . . . ^Vl *~» 

No date. A clear Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1350. Heading in red. Rubricated. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 220.] 

139 

214 x 139 mm. 1 leaf. Eighteen lines to the page. 

The MS. from which the leaf was culled contained the commentary on the Gospels by John 
Chrysostom, as the heading on fol. la is : 

No date. A Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1350. Headings in red. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 233.] 

140 

236 x 166 mm. 6 leaves. Thirteen lines to the page. 

A critical introduction to the Epistle of St. Paul to the Romans. 

Begins : & cX*j\ *J* .,>' ^ OU ^J\ J} jA x ^-oSJI <1Lj ^ [sic) U* . . . JV\ ^ 



ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 9 

The author asserts that the principal points discussed by St. Paul in his Epistle are twenty- 
six. These points are enumerated on ff . 30-40. The remaining leaves, ff. 4*-6a, contain various 
quotations for the confirmation of the author's contention. 

The treatise is incomplete at the end, and the text ends abruptly with the seventh point, as 

follows : . . . <iU- Jl <cjl~* ^k-jh *j\j*3 *^J ^ ^y ?** tf^ 

At the top of fol. 2a is an inscription, dated 30th April, a.d. 1772, and written by Cyril, 
bishop of the monastery of Mount Sinai, to the effect that the MS. is a waqf to the same monastery. 

No date. A clear, handsome and bold Naskhi hand of about a.d.. 1500. Many vowels. 
Headings in red. Well rubricated. I altered the order of the leaves, which were misplaced by 
the binder. Scribblings of the letters of the alphabet by an owner on fol. la. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 241.] 

IV 
APOCRYPHA 

141 

207 x 127 mm. 2 leaves. Nineteen lines to the page for ff. 16-26, and twenty-five for 

fol. la. Vellum. ... 

Fol. 2 is a palimpsest, of which the upper-writing is in Arabic and the under-writing in 

Coptic and Greek. 

UPPER-WRITING 

The Acta Pilati. 

The text is much shorter than that used in later recensions, su.ch as that I edited and 
translated in the second volume of my Woodbrooke Studies. 

Incomplete at the beginning. 

The end is: £-1 W> cJUlj \^j cX*\ ibUl &j\ *s\y\ &j*\ Ui 

No date and no rubrications. Ff. 16-26 are written by a later hand, in an early Naskhi 
hand bordering on Kufi, of about a.d. 1000, while fol. la is in an earlier Christian Kufi hand of 

about a.d. 800. . . 

A rough geometrical pattern on fol. 26 separates the end of the Acta Pilah from the beginning 

of the next treatise. 

UNDER-WRITING 

The leaf is apparently formed of two leaves which in the original MS. were facing each 
other. One of these leaves was written in Greek and the other in Coptic. They contain religious 
texts (not Biblical), and may be ascribed to about the sixth Christian century. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 145.] 

142 

210 x 146 mm. 1 leaf. Seventeen lines to the page. Vellum. 

A portion of the Acts of Thomas. 

In the seventh line a new section begins : 

.a! JU «JLJI wi* Jl dUI > Lb 






10 MINGANA COLLECTION 

It will be seen that the text is continuous with that of MS. No. 91 D, page 121 of 
Catalogue, vol. ii., from which MS. it is evidently culled. 

No date. For description see No. 91 of Catalogue, vol. ii., p. 122, where perhaps the date 
" about a.d. 830 " may be changed into " about a.d. 830-880." 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 148.] 

143 

206 x 157 mm. 5 leaves. Nine lines to the page. 

A fragment of the Apocalypse of Peter (o-J* jU*.), or Book of the Rolls (JUJI y tf) f or 
Qalementos " Clement," i.e. the eight books of Clement of Rome, the disciple of Peter. 1 

I he text contained in the MS. corresponds, in spite of some variants, with that which I 
edited and translated in the third volume of my Woodbrooke Studies, pp. 262 sqq. 

Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. The first extant words are : 

^Lii) L^ \2s\1a j_jX,_ jl^ «u^l <j»lj dll* 0-U1 
and the last words are : . . . ^ ^Vl jy ^ ^fc ^1 | >V I & ^ ijf # 

From the Coptic numbering of the leaves, we infer that 221 leaves are missing at the beginning. 
Evidently the MS. originally contained the whole text of the voluminous Apocalypse of Peter. 
No date. Written in an early and bold Egyptian Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1350. 
Rubricated. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 259.] 



V 
PRAYER-BOOKS AND SERVICE BOOKS 

144 

250 x 163 mm. 2 leaves. Vellum. 

The leaves contain a lectionary in Greek. The black ink has been rubbed off and the red 
ink left. The writing in red ink contains headings and liturgical directions. 

An Arabic inscription on fol. 1* gives the name of a reader, the monk Matthew, son of 
the brother of the priest Simon the Syrian, probably a monk from Mount Sinai. This inscription 
is written over the erased Greek writing. 

The Arabic inscription has no date. A Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1350. 

The Greek lectionary that has been rubbed off may be ascribed to the ninth Christian 
century. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 123.] 

1 See about all these titles, my Woodbrooke Studies, vol. iii., pp. 93-100. 






ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS n 

145 

160 x 117 mm. 1 leaf. Vellum. 

The leaf was culled from a MS. in Mount Sinai. 

The folio seems to belong to the end of a MS. 

The Arabic inscription found on it makes mention of the fact that in the MS. are found prayers 

to SS. Peter, Paul and others, and curses the one who takes it from the library of Mount Sinai. 

The leaf consists of three pieces of vellum sewn together by means of a thread. 

Unvowelled Naskhi of about a.d. 900-1000. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 126.] 

146 

186 x 134 mm. 

The final leaf of a MS. containing prayers. 

The name of a reader found at the end of the last prayer is missing, in consequence of the 
disappearance of the edges of the leaf. 

No date. A Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1000. 

I altered the position of the leaf which had been misplaced by the binder. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 180.] 

147 

228 x 187 mm. 2 leaves. Twenty-two lines to the page. Vellum. 
Part of the synaxarium of the Greek Church. 
The days found in it are from the 13th to the 17th April. 

Fol. la : 13th April. The martyrdom of the SS. Carpus, Papylus, Agathodorus, and 
Agathonica, martyred in the persecution of Decius : 

Fol. ib : 14th April. The martyrdom of SS. Nazarius, Gervasius, Protasius, and Celsius, 
who suffered martyrdom in the persecution of Nero, after the death of SS. Peter and Paul : 

tfj J-, ojj j i>x»U ^ill Lfxr*) xfx&M vfx&Jf* cryj^ Cfr^ ***** --r* C 1 ^ 1 

Fol. 2a : 15th April. The martyrdom of the priest Lucianus, in the persecution of 
Diocletian : H 

Fol. 20 : 16th April. The martyrdom of Longinus, the centurion, who was converted 
at the time of the Crucifixion : 

.IUI ^Jj j*UI isyfj a-^ 1 ^ 'J* < - r ' iU 

Fol. 2b : 17th April. The translation of the body of St. Lazarus : 



12 MINGANA COLLECTION 

No date. Early Christian Naskhi hand bordering on Kun, of about a.d. 1050. Headings 
in red. The ends of some lines are damaged, and some words on them are illegible. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 131.] 

148 

168 x 123 mm. 

One leaf culled from a MS. containing prayers. Twelve lines to the page. 

The prayer found on the leaf is incomplete at the beginning and at the end. 

The first extant words are : ^MW- IjS' Jx V.5 <>>- jT «dl"liL*-i 

No date. An early Christian Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1280. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 235.] 

149 

299 x 224 mm. 

One leaf forming the end of a MS. containing the synaxarium of the Greek Orthodox 
Church for the month of February. 

Dated 6842 of the Creation (a.d. 1334), and written in the monastery of Mount Sinai by the 
monk Simon, son of Joseph, in the time of [Ger]manus, the bishop of the monastery, for the 
Church of our Lady known as of the Syrians, in the same monastery. 

J t/uiJI lL-» j£> jj» *ii)ij . . . v-i-^ jj! jl«~- jvC—JI (jj'v'l JuJI a ^ iJjLJl JoLsl j& i yS 

.i-l jlyJl iij^^JI i-J£" —rfjj dUSj .^o\ 

About Abbot Germanus, see Nos. 126 [197], and 176 [238]. 

A clear and bold Naskhi hand. Headings in red. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 228.] 

150 

174 x 131 mm. 5 leaves. Fourteen lines to the page. 
The Liturgy according to the Greek Orthodox Church. 
Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. 
The first extant words are : 

.<ic ^gi-ai jt ju=>el~*Jt j.c. ^ \L\\ mJSS ^J \jaiu* JO /y»J) L^ Ul JO ^»J 

The last prayer begins : Jjl^l & •Uljtir L. jc U*V1 Vj )1 I4.J iJ^jlj 

On fol. 16 mention is made in a prayer of the holders of the sees of Constantinople, 
Alexandria, Antioch and Jerusalem. 

No date. A clear, handsome and bold Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1400. No rubrications. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 168.] 



ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 13 

151 

189 x 133 mm. 2 leaves. 

The leaves were culled from a MS. in Mount Sinai. 

Fol. ib contains an inscription to the effect that the MS. belongs to the monastery of Mount 
Sinai, and that anyone who takes it will have the fate of Judas. 
Fol. za contains the index to the 17 treatises of the MS. : 

;** yt* jldl .^X-VI J- :*- >* c5^' -p^ 1 ;> ^ > U1 "VJ 1 ; ^ CT^ 1 '*> •** ^ 
^ ^Ui .Joisli :>^ ^ j-tf-i -Ui u-u ;*• >c giji ,;^Ui o» >* JUI .^1 

From this index it is seen that the MS. served as a sacerdotal, and as a service-book and 

office-book for the monks of the monastery of Mount Sinai. 

Fol. 2b contains a scribbling in Georgian by an owner. 

No date. A Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1450. .,***,- 

[Mmgana Chr. Arab. Add. 169. 

152 

217 x 160 mm. 284 leaves. Sixteen lines to the page. 

The Coptic-Arabic Synaxarium for the months of Barmahat, Barmudah, Bashnas, Bawunah, 
Abib, Misori, and the five complementary days called Nasi. 

Three leaves are missing at the beginning, the first of which must have contained the title- 
page Only the last part of the text containing the lives of the saints who fall on the first day 
of the month of Barmahat is found in a complete form. This text has for its last saint the 
martyr Alexander of Rome. 

The order is as follows : 

Ff. 1-44& : Month of Barmahat. 

Ff. 44&-86& : Month of Barmudah. 

Ff. 866-132^ : Month of Bashnas. 

Ff. 1320-179& : Month of Bawunah 

Ff. I79&-232A : Month of Abib. 

Ff. 2320-273^ : Month of Misori. 

Ff . 273^-2846 contain the five complementary days, with the heading : 

- 

The text exhibited in the MS. is more or less similar to that edited and translated by 
Rene Basset, in Patrologia Orientalis, vols. xvi. and xvii. There are often, however, important 



x 4 MINGANA COLLECTION 

discrepancies between them, and often also whole paragraphs found in our MS. are missing 
in the text found in Patrologia Orientalis. So the beginning of the life of the Abbot Barsauma, 
as found in the printed text (ibid., vol. xvii., p. 777), is different from that found in our MS. 
(fol. 281a) : 

.jUI jX J^JI jl^l L^ Ul ^M j:j\ j,^jj| ^uj! _,y, _, Ul ^ M ^ V| ^._ UJ ^ 

,Uc 3 ^__ fcjJ j£ .Uj •Ly a> oi j ^ tf 3 ^__ ^j a \ \&.\j\ 3 j*> j$\ A Vj1 j/o^IA* 

«Ljj JU- ^ <, --5r <c.U*e» 

So also in our MS., at the end of the last day of the month of Barmahat (fol. 446), there is 
a sentence to the effect that on the 30th of the month faUs also the commemoration of the 
translation of the body of Saint Jacob Intercisus, who was cut to pieces : 

.jy* o* **r" ^ *-¥ f^ 1 ' uy* ju*- Jsi Ul <Jj 
Nothing to this effect is found in the corresponding text of Patrologia Orientalis (vol. xvi., p. 274). 
Dated Saturday, 2nd of the complementary days of Nasi, of the year 1186 * of the Martyrs 
(a.d. 1470) : ' 

K„K«lw? kll r N f M ' H ? dingS " red ' WeU ™ bri <*ted.. Fairly broad margins. 
Folios numbered in Coptic numerals. One leaf is missing between ff. 6-7. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 267.] 

153 

155 x 106 mm. 9 leaves. Thirteen lines to the page 

Sinai Prayer " b °° k aCC ° rdin § t0 the Greek ^hodox Church, for use by the monks of Mount | 

The MS. is ^complete at the end, and contains only the prayers before going to bed. I 

Begins : UVI I Si *J| J*, ; jU r U, . :>J , *, -^ u , 

R^^^^^tr^ 1500 - Headi ngs in red. Well rubricated. 
Christodolus Tn oTT, T ^^ in AnMc and Greek b y the 0WI *r, the monk 
be^—uicSeTbvTn^ ^ s r Chnstod ° 1 '* writes that anyone who steals the MS. will 

s^nsaa -sitch ^i - nother simaar inscription " the patriarch I 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 158.] 

154. 

. 127 x 87 mm. " LO * 

inclu^SST inSCripti ° n by Badr b - a - **4 b - a. Karam, and some short prayers, 
No date. About a.d. 1500. 
— - — - [Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 198.] 

W ntten also m Coptic numerals. 



ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 15 

155 

218 x 160 mm. 3 leaves. Sixteen lines to the page. 

Stray leaves from a Coptic prayer-book. 

Incomplete at the beginning and at the end, and the text not consecutive between each leaf. 

The first heading on fol. 20 is : 

No date. Written in a clear Egyptian Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1500. Headings in red. 
Well rubricated. Folios numbered in Coptic numerals. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 264.] 

156 

230 x 160 mm. 3 leaves. Sixteen lines to the page. 

The leaves were culled from a prayer-book of the Greek Orthodox Church, of which they 
formed the last leaves. Something is missing between ff. 1-2 and 2-3. 
Incomplete at the beginning. 
The three leaves contain the Canticles (r^.^J). 

The subscription is : jUS3l^ f Ul jc w«JI tfjUl ~AJ\ z^~ 

A note of reading by John (U^_) from Ladhiqiyah is on fol. 3b. 

No date. A clear, handsome and bold Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1500. Many vowels. 
Headings in red. Profusely rubricated. The writing resembles more or less that of No. 140 
[241]. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 254.] 

157 

143 x 94 mm. 1 leaf. Eleven lines to the page. 

A leaf from a prayer-book of the Greek Church. 

The first words are : dlrLoi J^U; ^1 V ^f \J>* ,U4 V ^\ (sic) >LUI lst-J\ dliUI I4.J 

No date. Clear Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1500. Headings in red. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 156.] 

158 

156 x 106 mm. 340 leaves. Thirteen lines to the page. 

A 

Ff . ib-io8a : The Horologion of the Greek Melchites, translated from Greek into Arabic, 
in the town of Aleppo, by the Patriarch Aftimius (Euthymius) al-Hamawi, who died in Damascus 
in a.d. 1637. 

. JJJI u_i-aj 1*%* dllj Jjl .v_Jb- <i-U J j6 U £yd-\ 



l6 MINGANA COLLECTION 

The names of saints to whom prayers are attributed are : 

Ff. 13&, 636, 78a, 94a : Basil of Caesarea. 

Ff. 59^, 77& • Saint Ephrem. 

Fol. 82a : Sophronius, Patriarch of Jerusalem. 

Fol. 102a : Paul the Hermit. 

Fol. 103a : Antiochus the monk. 

Fol. 1036 : Eunicius (jrj£j.j>). 

B 

Ff. io8a-2i9« : The Menologion and Euchologion of the Greek Melchite Church. 

.icL ^Lc ^1 <U ciMo **L ^ Jrt oW «^*Uj 
The names of saints are the same as those in No. 32,' Catalogue, vol. ii., CMm Arabic MSS., 
pp. 35-37- 

Ff 2190-2626 : The Service-Book of the Melchites entitled &,J\ , and containing the 
prayers called cA>;> and A *B . It extends from " the Sunday of the Pharisee and the 
Publican " to " the Sunday of All Saints." 

The work makes mention here and there of the saints of the day. 

D 

Ff . 263^-314^ : Order of various prayers, beginning with the prayers to the Virgin, in which 
no sitting is allowed. 

Cf . No. 25, Catalogue, vol. ii., Christian Arabic MSS., pp. 3<>-3*- 

E 
Ff. 3i4«-34ofc : The prayers under the title of Metalepsis (,WA#t<?). 
Incomplete at the end. 

The names of saints to whom prayers are attributed are : 

Ff . 322a, 337ft : Basil of Cassarea. 

Ff. 324a, 330a, 333* and ft, 335ft, 34<>« "• J ohn Chrysostom. 

Fol. 325ft : Simon the Recluse. 

Ff. 329ft, 335a : John of Damascus (Joannes Damascenus). 

Fol. 330ft : Simon the Theologian. 



ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 17 

No date. Clear Syrian Naskhi of about a.d. 1680. Main headings in thick black characters, 
and sub-headings in red. Profusely rubricated. Fol. 303 has a large hole in the lower half, and 
the last few leaves are damaged by damp. 

On the title-page is a note of the birth of Khalil b. Ibrahim on Monday, 28th of September, 

1846. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 121.] 

159 

211 x 145 mm. 6 leaves. Eighteen lines to the page. 

Liturgical prayers in Greek, and Biblical pericopes in Arabic. 

Incomplete at the beginning. 

On fol. 6a is an inscription by Jacob, son of George Maqdisi, from Aleppo, who states that 
he read the MS. when he visited the monastery of Mount Sinai with the Archimandrite Maskubi, 
on the 6th August, a.d. 1870. 

No date. A clear Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1700. The Greek hand seems also to point 

to the same period. ^ 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 226.] 

160 

156 x 106 mm. 22 leaves. Generally various lines to the page. 

A booklet belonging to Macarius, a monk of the monastery of Mount Sinai (fol. iv). 

The memoranda of the monk Macarius extend from fol. i to fol. iv, and fol. 17 to fol. 22. 
These leaves are rilled with various prayers, and even with the Arabic alphabet and Arabic 
reading exercises. Evidently Macarius was not Arabic-speaking by birth. 

Ff. 1-16& contain various prayers of the Greek Church. 

On ff. la and 2a are two prayers to St. Basil the Great (^J3l i/j^V 3r*0« 

The part written by the monk Macarius is dated, on fol. 216, a.d. 88, probably a shortening 

for 1888. 

.[\a]aa &* <* : »> r Cr^> J** ^ &r> Cm ' 

The part not written by Macarius is earlier, and may be ascribed to about a.d. 1750. 
Egyptian Naskhi hand. Headings in red, and in the part written by Macarius, often in 

thick characters. ... , 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 154.J 

161 

210 x 156 mm. 2 leaves. 

The introductory matter to a MS. containing the Octoechus of the Greek Church. 

.y o J5» j c *uvi f y j j-j ^ ^ v ui J° ^ Jl ^>^ VI ^ 

Dated (fol. 2b) 21st May, a.d. 1786, and 15th Sha'ban, a.h. 1200, and written by 'Abdallah 
son of Joseph Rumlyah, who was from Syria but living in Cairo. 

2 



l8 MINGANA COLLECTION 

[«n*. .' . #>3 ji ^ ^ j* y «*"' ^ ^ ^ J v*-* 1 : ^ e> *w *^ ^ 

Clear Naskhi hand. No rubrications. ^^ ^ Amb Add ^j 

162 

zoo x 156 mm. 4 leaves. Eighteen lines to the page. ■ 

Title-page/beginning and end of the Horologion of the Greek Orthodox Church. 

Fol. m, title : oBjl V 1 <j ^V* 11 °^ Ub °'-> UI '°^^ ■ 

Fol. 16, after . . . Ji\ p-. and title JJ1I _i-i :*- 

Fol. a** and fol. 3- belong together, according to the custode on fol. aj .below. 

Fol. 3 «, the end of the book ; after that reading-notes from different hands fol. 4 blank. 

On fol. 3. is a note of reading by Gregory, a monk of the monastery of Mount Sun. who 
states that he embraced the monastic life on the 3rd of April, A.D. 1710, and that he was from 
Damascus, and that his father was called Joseph, surnamed Habib. . 

On fol. 3 i is another inscription by an owner, Nasr-Allah, son of Michael Bannan, dated 2nd 

° f ^fxtlusTal^the^ord Jttft of the title, the date - A.D. X795 " is written, I do 

not know for what purpose. 

Naskhi hand. Headings in red. ^^ ^ ^ M± 1%] 

163 

126 x 90 mm. 177 leaves. Generally twelve lines to the page. 
A prayer-book of the Coptic Uniate Church. 

uju ijW, uin d*u uji <sjs J** #s ^ t~' h - *f* tr*~ 3 JUr 4J1 dy> - — J * ' ' 

------- ^, JU 53, j c 411 

All the rubrics are in Arabic, but the prayers are both in Coptic and in Arabic, with the 
exception of some Psalms and the final prayers to the Virgin, which are exclusively in Arabic. 
The book begins with the Prayer of Midnight (Jill v^Ui !**) (fl . 9"58«), followed by Morning 

Prayers (J\ IX~) (ff. 58^-82^). 

Ff. 83^154^ contain various prayers to the Virgin, angels, apostles, martyrs, and various 
saints, with a heading : 

Ff . 1546-1630 : The Salutation to the Virgin. 

Ff . i6ib-ij6a : A long prayer to the Virgin, which if anyone recites every day, the Virgin 
will be present with him when his soul leaves his body. 

.„j^ # O.JJ £» cJ> .ju* j^ 5U C U jTlirtjl J* f ib jJfrj c * Xfis tf>^ J^ UU . . . 



ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 19 

Dated (fol. 1766) Tuesday, 1st of Bashnas (or Bashons), 1565 of the Martyrs, which corre- 
sponds with 15th of Jumada.II, 1265 of the Hijrah (a.d. 1848), and written by the deacon Macarius 
Ibrahim, for a deacon who was a teacher, and whose name, written in red characters, is illegible. 

i^- <l, j ijjUi i±ji r _y_ j vwaij ujui oiy-» v 31 l -^ * j ^ \r^ *** cH <y tl^ ^ 3 

\n« 4)L. >VI aU- »l ^ >c ^itl ^ll j dili jil^Jlj .'. . l jlfrJ-Vl lofii! _i)VI 4. iL-ij afo 
o-Lill . . . aJU ^ l+Ac J^lj tfjUl ^Vl .i*. p^Jlj ^Ul j^j . . . ;^1 j^.5 *-i- j^>j « — all 

.y r vi Lu* ^ijji (sic) c/^>» jxCJi ^-uiij ...[...] r ui . . . Cj cji 

The Arabic part is written in a clear and slightly bold Egyptian Naskhi hand, and the Coptic 
part in thick black characters. Headings in red. Well rubricated. 

On all folios in which the Coptic and Arabic languages are used together, the page is divided 
into two columns. All fol. lb is occupied with a figure of the Cross. Geometrical patterns 

separate the main divisions of the MS. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 122.] 

VI 
THEOLOGY AND THEOLOGICAL HISTORY 

164 

129 x 160 mm. 2 leaves. Ten or twelve lines to the page. 

Vellum and palimpsest, of which the upper-writing is in Arabic, and the under-writing 
in Syriac. 

UPPER-WRITING 

An extract from a book of sermons : My J& . 
On fol. 26 a third sermon begins, as follows : 

The words " the third sermon " are in red. 

No date. Written in a clear Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1350. 

UNDER-WRITING 

Mystical matter from the writings of an early Father, which appears to be taken from two 

different MSS. 

No date. Syriac Estrangela hand of about a.d. 650. 



[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 138.] 



165 



190 x no mm. 1 leaf. Sixteen lines to the page. 

Vellum and palimpsest, of which both the upper-writing and the under-writing are in Arabic. 



1 Written also in Coptic numerals. 



20 MINGANA COLLECTION 

UPPER-WRITING 

A theological work without beginning and without end, in which mention is made of good 
works, and of heaven and hell. 

Mention is made in the fragment of the Ark of Noah, and of the fact that anyone who was 
outside it perished. This presumably constituted a comparison between the Ark of Noah on 
one side and the Church and the kingdom of heaven on the other side. 

The first extant words are : 

^Jj ryb\ Jl ^1 J>o Ji) {sic) .Ui-1 vliUI Jki UUI CI} }*> ^J) JjftJl j£~* pJUt xj» jUI J3 

No date. Written in an early Christian Kufi hand of about a.d. 850. 

UNDER-WRITING 

No date. Early Kufi-Naskhi hand of about a.d. 770. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 150.] 

166 

188 x 180 mm. 1 leaf of two columns to the page. Sixteen lines to the column. 

Vellum and palimpsest, of which the upper-writing is in Arabic, and the under-writing in 

Armenian. 

UPPER-WRITING 

The upper-writing contains a Christ ological treatise in the form of a sermon. 

The edges on the right-hand side of the first column, and those on the left-hand side of the 
second column, are damaged, and in many cases completely torn away, with the consequent 
disappearance of many words. 

The first consecutive sentence is : J-*t£ •yl LJ ».Lote 

No date. Written in an early Christian Kufi hand of about a.d. 850. 

UNDER-WRITING 

Not Biblical. Possibly a fragment of a legal code. 

Two columns to the page. Written in an Armenian uncial hand of the ninth century a.d. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 124.] 

167 

197 x 153 mm. 1 leaf. Fifteen lines to the page. Vellum. 

The obverse contains the end of a discourse on the general Resurrection. 

A sentence at the beginning is : U-» U* JJLdl oyyk. [• • •] J <£>^ Jt-3 £rf\y. jy*J 
The reverse contains the beginning of an Apocryphal discourse, attributed to John the 
Evangelist, on the miracles that took place at the death of the Virgin : 

Aa-U J Cjj4^ J$\ k-tUJlj J^>V1 Jc Alls «~*» Jl fy* UaVIj Uj <_,->- ^Aflll tfjjj £• \x£ Jy . . . 



ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS * l 

The MS. from which this leaf is culled evidently contained salutations to the Virgin, as the 
first heading is : l^»LJ Jc- J/VI *>U! 

No date. Early Christian Kufi hand of about A.D. 850. Headings in red. Well rubricated. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 130.] 

168 

223 x 180 mm. 1 leaf. Seventeen lines to the page. Vellum. 

A discourse by a Father, on the angels, and on the fact that Christ is greater than they 
and the prophets and apostles, etc. 

The apostles are known by the word <>>ciJl , from the Syriac ),:;. »\ > . 

The folio contains the end of one discourse and the beginning of another. The first ends : 

.,>l ^..^IjJI yo Jl JJUuH^ UiJIj 4m~JI a! . . . jvl/yi l^^ir ~. c£JJl Aj\* 

The last two words of the heading of the second cannot be deciphered with safety, but its be- 
ginning is : 

.4-1 jL^ cij mJI fy-J . . • t5^ jJ+3 i$j^5 ish?** *£J* ^ ^*— Jl 

No date. Early Christian Kufi hand of about a.d. 850-880. On the obverse side some 
words that had become somewhat dim have been blackened by a later hand. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 134.] 

169 

219 x 156 mm. 

A leaf of vellum, the first nine lines of which contain the end of a theological work, divided 
into 3 babs, which apparently treated of God and of the love which He inspired in all good men 
of the Old and New Testaments. 

The colophon is : ftjLj *yj* ^ **-*'j»j >±*\y* «-*^ <j-j£JI ^j ii^-*. »iJbl J^aJl Jj Laiil o» 

,^a\ JSa\ J»\ .Aj> JAJ *M~* JA) 

The above nine lines contain the only remaining words of the work. 

No date. Written in an early Christian Kufi hand of about a.d. 880. Many diacritical 
points are missing. 

All the writing that follows consists of scribblings in Arabic and Greek by later scribes from 
Mount Sinai. 

The first long Arabic scribbling is an attempt to write an introduction to a work. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 151.] 

170 

277 x 223 mm. 2 leaves. Twenty-three lines to the page. Vellum. 

The leaves are apparently from two different works contained in the same MS. 



22 MINGANA COLLECTION 

A 

Fol. i : A collection of ecclesiastical canons, mostly from the " Canons of the Apostles," 
dealing with bishops, priests and deacons. 

The Canons of the Apostles quoted are the 4th, 45th, 54th, 60th, 22nd, 15th, 6th, 17th and 
25th. Further, the 5th canon of the Council of Laodicea and the 7th canon of the Sixth Council 
are quoted on fol. la. 

The word " baptism " is once translated by Lc^a (fol. lb), and another time by the more 

common ii^u. (fol. la). The word for " apostles " is as usual j^Ju . 
The 25th Canon of the Apostles is as follows (fol. lb) : 

B 

Fol. 2 : An extract from a work containing a Biblical commentary. 

The extract deals with the baptism of John the Baptist, and contains two headings, marked 
as the 22nd and the 23rd, which begin (fol 2a) : 

and (fol. 2&) : J^ ^1 J JVI y> cJl 4—. l*»j r^-Jl Jl ..Lote li*J &» je • t >.-r Lc J *^ 

As seen in the above quotation, the word for " baptism" is here &-« . 

No date. Written in an early Christian Kufi hand of about a.d. 870-900. Headings in red. 
Well rubricated. Fairly broad margins. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 140.] 

171 

202 x 150 mm. 1 leaf. Twenty-two lines to the page. 

Vellum and palimpsest, of which the upper-writing is in Arabic, and the under-writing in 
Greek. 

UPPER-WRITING 

The end of a work containing the ecclesiastical canons of marriage. 

The canons contained in it are those from 5 to 10. 

The colophon is : \ J ~$' UjuJ Jiii\$ 4I! &y, jol^ill ,5* c~~" 

No date. Written in a clear Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1050. 

UNDER-WRITING 

Homiletic matter in Greek. Not New Testament (as shown by ISov ydp at the beginning of 
the line in the middle of column 1). Note the section-numbers 0' and »' at the top of column 2. 
No date. Uncial script of the fifth century. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 125.] 



ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 23 

172 

172 x 134 mm. 1 leaf. Seventeen lines to the page. 

The leaf was culled from a MS., and contains the end of the work of Antiochus, the monk of 
the monastery of St. Saba, who died about a.d. 620. 

The work contained 130 capita, and was addressed to St. Eustathius, the archimandrite of 
the monastery of Euthaliptus * in the town of Angora, or Ancyra, of Galatia. 

A statement on the obverse is : ^.j j-^'lk-jl Jl ^asH LU II j^- ^ ^JJI ^*\)\ ^yi\ 
.411 dy» cjS ji *X»3 j^yfj iU lite j-jjj U,)^ ^| |^oi aLj^ ^jJU/yi ^ij^-JI ^all 

(Antiochus the monk who is of the fold (orjKos) of St. Abba Saba to Eustathius chief of the 
monastery known as Atalitus in the city of Ankara which is in Galatia a hundred, and thirty 
different chapters and these have been finished by God's help.) 

After this statement is the beginning of a letter to Eustathius : 
Jl o, £) 4)1 JLifcJi w^il J\if &\ $ J.U Jj^Jl X>l ^o cJ^ J cr^rlk-jl y Vi l^l 

. . . I4JJ UU Ul[j] jxT^o *> Jl ^J r yvi ^ 

This book seems to be the same as that described in the quotation given in No. 870 of 
Bibliotheque de MSS. Paul Sbath, h\, 82, where it is stated that a Father called Antiochus, from 
the monastery of St. Saba, wrote a book entitled w<xvB4kti)s, or j j^\ ^U-l . There was a long 
TTavSeKTTjs and a short TravhiKrqs. The short iravBeKTTjs is that found in the present MS. and in the 
following numbers. For the long mvMaip, attributed to Nikon, see below, No. 179 [227], and 
No. 46 of Catalogue, vol. ii., pp. 66-69. 

No date. A Naskhi hand of about a.d. iioo. No rubrications. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 189.] 

173 

265 x 178 mm. 4 leaves. Twenty-two lines to the page. 

A 

Ff. ia-^b : The letter sent by the monk Antiochus from the monastery of St. Saba to 
Eustathius the Archimandrite of the monastery of al-Astalis 2 in the town of Ancyra of Galatia. 

At the beginning and in the body of the text the work is said to be the " short TravSiKrrjs," 
about which see the preceding No. 172 [189]. In a sentence of the text (fol. za) it is stated 
that the work consists of 130 chapters (Ulj jdL'j IX c«&S), 

Begins : ^.oSJI j*-. ^ ^jJl ^IJI ^^ ^ Ju-jl t^ 1 ^J 1 ^r^ ***/ u~°~} ^ Oy» lS-^ 

J»-l J* .yj I Jjl •j~^\ &)\i*\ y>) ."<]*%. *j&\ AJUJUj jjJUa- [VI] j_z ^J jr^flLijI Jl IjL^* 

.jM ^ r Jl ^ r ^ 6x& ^ ^T jj^ jl& dlil UlL-jl ^^531 V VI Ue.1 c~5" dlil 

1 In the following No. 173 [206] this name appears as Astalis, but the first two letters before " s " have partly 
disappeared from the edge of the MS. 

2 The margin is here defective, and a letter or two have disappeared at the beginning of this word. In the above reading 
I considered these letters as the article " al." In the preceding No. 172 [189] the name seems to read ^.iJlWI . 



24 MINGANA COLLECTION 

B 

Ff. 3^-4« : Another work by the above monk Antiochus. 

Begins as in No. 174 [165] : J jLJU «c.j JU" jl Ij^\ cns)\ & J^» jx* ^j.iV.j 

See the following No. 174 [165], where mention is made also of the fact that the threescore 
queens and fourscore concubines of the Song of Solomon (vi. 7) referred to the authentic and 
apocryphal Books of the Old and New Testaments respectively. 

C 

Fol. 4b : The first discourse of a series of discourses, apparently by the above monk 
Antiochus. 

The discourse is on Faith, and begins as in No. [165] : 

Incomplete at the end. No date. Clear and handsome Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1450. 

Headings in red. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 206.] 

174 

182 x 134 mm. 4 leaves. Fifteen lines to the page. 

The leaves contain theological, Biblical and mystical matter, apparently culled from the 
same work of Antiochus as that described in the two preceding numbers. 

On fol. 26 is the heading of a discourse attributed to Antiochus, in which it is explained that 
the three score queens and four score concubines of the Song of Solomon (ch. vi., v. 8) refer to the 
sixty Canonical Books found in the Old and the New Testaments, and the eighty Apocryphal 
Books of both Testaments. 

Begins : <&U jC- t^il «*Ldl <«*-» J jLJL- «cj .JUr jl »ju^JI jrjjjll Cf" ^^* >w cr*"JC^^ 

The words " Apocryphal Books " are translated by <uy£JI ^^b-UJl 
On fol. 3« is the beginning of a discourse on Faith : 

l5 iJb . . . il/VI jp ^JJl ^**Jl JUJl Vjl Ijlj J_jill 4p%&m&) ^J\ jub .iiUVI jc J/yi ^_JI 

.*iyL> jvJJJ ji\d\ y> t^JJI 4^. Vjl ^y jl 

The end of the discourse on fol. 2 deals with SS. Modestus and Eustathius. 
No date. Clear and slightly bold Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1500. Headings in red. Well 
rubricated. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 165.] 

175 

250 x 163 mm. 2 leaves. Nineteen lines to the page. 

The leaves contain the index to a mystical and theological work which was divided into 130 
chapters (bdbs). 



ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 25 

Begins : uA julo <»_U Uoacj yt^Vl ^ w-i»-stJI 1J* J t« ^-"y .<rU-» viilJI »y>^>- <*>-yA\ q>\ *~* t 

The first five babs are : JJ>\ #. .jLJI Uj jc . JVl c .U-Jl ^ .*UVI ^ 

From a comparison of the text with that of the preceding and following numbers we may 

infer that the present MS. contained the work known as the " short iravSeKrrjs " by the monk 

Antiochus from the monastery of St. Saba, who died about a.d. 620. 

No date. A Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1200. The references to the folios of the MS. 

are in Greek numerals. Rubricated. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 219.] 

176 

208 x 138 mm. 

One leaf culled from a MS. in the monastery of Mount Sinai and containing the beginning of 
the index to a work, which seems to be the short travheKrqs of Antiochus, found in the preceding 
and following numbers. 

Begins : ^ (a) -J^H $\s j~* <j^3 *>}* p*J ^LJI j* J*^\ li* J U ^J* <J& . . . yVI ^ 

.jji uj ^ (d) .jryi jp (c) .uji ^ (b) .auvi 

On fol. la is an inscription by the abbot Germanus, the bishop of the monastery of Mount 
Sinai, in which he states that the MS. is a waqf to his monastery. See Nos. 126 [197] and 149 
[228], from which we know that the bishop Germanus lived in a.d. 1334. 

No date. A bold Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1334. Headings in red. Geometrical patterns 

at the top of the page. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 238.] 

177 

266 x 171 mm. 1 leaf. Seventeen lines to the page. 

The leaf was culled from a MS., and contains the beginning of an index to a mystical work 
consisting of 130 sections (qauls). 

The leaf contains 45 out of the original 130 headings. 

Begins : jc J/VI .Jy j^\> <> ^*-*l v^ 1 '•** ^r* ^^ j*^> jUaftll o^JI $\ ^ 

A comparison of this index with that found in the above numbers shows that the mystical 
and theological work from which the present leaf is culled was the short TravBiKrqs by Antiochus, 
a monk of the monastery of St. Saba, who died about a.d. 620. The translation, however, from 
the Greek does not seem to have been made by the same author. 

No date. A slightly bold Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1450. Rubricated. Fairly broad 

margins. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 210.] 

178 

220 x 163 mm. 

A leaf culled from a MS. of the monastery of Mount Sinai, and containing the beginning of 
the introduction by George, son of Michael Sabbagh, to the work of Antiochus, a monk of the 
monastery of St. Saba, of whom mention is made in the preceding and following numbers. 



26 MINGANA COLLECTION 

Begins : Jyi ^Tui . . . jWj >\* UT ^jill <^j & ft* SI jU^N 4-jj KU* <**» 4 xi-l 

At the top of the page is an inscription by the monk Jacob, to the effect that he gave this 
" MS. of St. Antiochus " as waqf, presumably to the monastery of Mount Sinai. 
No date. A Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1650. Rubricated. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 188.] 

179 

411 x 330 mm. 2 leaves of two columns. Twenty-eight lines to the column. 

The beginning of the work entitled TravSeVn??. 

In comparing this MS. with No. 46 of Catalogue, vol. ii., p. 66, 1 ascertained that it represents 
the recension divided into 63 maqalahs and known as the long na^iicnjs, attributed by some 
authors to Nikon, a monk who nourished in the second half of the eleventh century, 1 and not the 
short mrffaip referred to in the above numbers, and attributed in all the MSS. to Antiochus, 
a monk of the monastery of St. Saba, who died about a.d. 620. This short miMcnp is divided 

into 130 chapters. 

In the introduction mention is made of the work of Antiochus of St. Saba. 2 

jc j^l, <iv ^jLi y>j ^U-i o- J- itT wUi yvi ^3i <y ^f u> u r L- jUi ^ 

&* j jVi ij£*> .»!>., o- <«& »y <y^ j^j v ^^ L ^ ¥-^ ^ *>* ^^ *-^ ^ ! 

Ijf y, U j> : c^J* -w l^ iLL. U*^ U* -S^fc. a^ U^Ur tfbj \jtf c*Oj a-^UI juJI ^ 
Lb Jjijl ojl^j JL- 411 S^m -iUJ» II* wiUj _i~-aJI II* .Ji ^ilUI w>IJI ^- ^ . . . v^ 1 

The present MS., which may be ascribed to about a.d. 1215, bears out the opinion of Cheikho, 
referred to in note 1 of this page, that the work is to be attributed to the monk Antiochus 
al-Ghalati, and not to Nikon. 

At the top of fol. la is an inscription by Sim'an (Simon), bishop of the monastery of Mount 
Sinai, who nourished in the beginning of the thirteenth century. See Nos. 210 [194], 211 
[214], 137 [217] and 243 [234]. He states, as usual, that he had this copy of the MS. made for 
the monks of the monastery of Mount Sinai. 3 



1 



Cheikho {Catalogue des MSS. des auteurs Arabes Chretiens, p. 42) attributes this work to another Antiochus, whom 
he calls al-Ghalati (from Galatia), a monk in the monastery of Mount Athos, or the Black Mountain, who flourished also in 
the eleventh Christian century. 

2 This introduction differs from that found in BibliotUque de MSS. Paul Sbath, ii., 82-83. 

3 The wording of this statement is more or less similar to that found in No. 137 [217]. 



ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 27 

J> IL- j^ jUj UU ^5ol >jJI la* jl U~- j> ^ii-i jL~- jUJIj <m531 j jii-l M Jyl 

•u** £• ^.? fV^ 0^> jo *>-3 ts\ *=rJ-\} j^ 

No date. A bold Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1215. Headings in red. Geometrical patterns 

at the beginning. . t , 4 , _ _ 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 227.] 

180 

222 x 169 mm. and 227 x 149 mm. 2 leaves. Nineteen lines to the page. Vellum. 
Discourses by Fathers of the Church. 

The discourse beginning on fol. ib is by Gregory Nazianzen, on the Epiphany of the Lord, 
and is to be read on the day of the Nativity. 

^Jl y> ^JJI AlVi jy& > Alii ^jljttl tfyjfrj' J~? CsV* ^ **r Mj &- J5 ^ CT^ 1 

No date. Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1150. Fol. 2 is numbered in Coptic numerals as 362. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 133.] 

181 

154 x 122 mm. 1 leaf. Twelve lines to the page. ^ 

The leaf, which was culled from a MS., contains on its reverse the beginning of a book of 

extracts from the works of SS. John Chrysostom, Basil of Caesarea, Ephrem, Nilus, Carpus, and 

others. 

oljiVI t.VI Jh o*J) *£** fljto tfxlr'b ^ r* ^- aSjl J1 ^ 1 & *^ <^ U *** ' * " vVI <""*• 

Begins : i^UJI ^ aJU- kU» Iy5? J 1 f&Li ->VjV! U»J 

The beginning of the obverse of the leaf contains an inscription to the effect that the MS. 

belongs to the monastery of Mount Sinai. 

No date. A Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1250. Heading in red. I altered the position of the 

leaf, which had been misplaced by the binder. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 231. J 

182 

194 x 128 mm. 10 leaves. Eleven lines to the page. 

The theological work which proceeds by way of question and answer, the question being 
asked by a " pupil " and answered by a " teacher." 

The leaves contain the end of question 22, all question 23, with some lacuna?, and part 01 

another question on fol. 10. 

Ubl M J3 \ jl o JL j^lj JWI Jyil .<s~^ f.»J tf^J £^ utV^ cs^ * cH 1 

JUKI Jtt . . . J.J^r-1 <,» 

No date. A Naskhi hand (slightly resembling Diwani) of about a.d. 1250. Headings in 
red. The ink has begun to fade on the three last leaves. ^ ^ Add ^ 



28 MINGANA COLLECTION 

183 

200 x 130 mm. 3 leaves. From thirteen to sixteen lines to the page. 
The leaves were culled from a MS. of which they formed the last leaves. 
The MS. contained the above (MS. 182) work of questions asked by a pupil and answered 
by a teacher. 

From the last words found on fol. 3b we know that the complete work was composed of 

40 qauls : jmjVI Jy!l *>" . 

The work ends : £j~js rc-o Sbj* U*l £*>•} <3^ j^-JI ^3 41 aj! (S Ji\ ( yp- -u! <Sj^ J^*wl J^> 

.<>.jV1 Jyll pT .*fcVI 4*1? 41 <il ajl-s Jy 4* 4^ I* 

No date. Written in a Naskhi hand of about A.D. 1450. At the end of fol. 3b is a note 

of reading by Musa b. Nasr- Allah. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 256.] 

184 

220 x 149 mm. 2 leaves. Fourteen or fifteen lines to the page. 

The leaves, which were culled from a MS. of the monastery of Mount Sinai, contain the end 
of a theological work in which questions are asked by " a pupil " and answers are given by " a 
teacher," as seen in the above two numbers. 

The heading on fol. xa is : ^^i- j 4«» l*j ?*b ^r^} *«**" J' ^^ ^ U^ l£» ^r^l <U-JI 

Fol. 26 contains five notes of reading by : 

(a) Abbot John of the monastery of Mount Sinai. 

(6) 'Atur (,/U). 

(c) Abbot John, bishop of the monastery of Abbot John in Egypt (\j~*^\ jIjJI). 

(d) Ephrem Khatimi (?) 

The writer of the fifth inscription does not give his name, but asks for the forgiveness of his 
sins through St. Moses (probably the Patriarch, because of his connection with Mount Sinai). 
No date. A Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1550. Headings in red. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 215.] 

185 

215 x 135 mm. 2 leaves. Fourteen lines to the page. 

The leaves are culled from a MS. containing pious anecdotes and mystical matter. 
The story found in them was narrated by the Abbot Daniel Farani, from St. Arsenius, and 
tends to prove the belief that the Eucharistic bread represents the real body of our Lord. 
The heading in the middle of fol. 1 a is : 

The book takes the form of " the Fathers " asking questions, and " the old man " answering 
them. 

No date. A clear Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1400. Headings in red. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 224.] 



ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 29 

186 

202 x 135 mm. 2 leaves. Eighteen lines to the page. 

The leaves were culled from a large MS. containing parenetical matter, and deal mostly with 
humility. Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. 
The first extant words are : 

No date. Clear and bold Naskhi of about a.d. 1300. Rubricated. Numbered in Coptic 

numerals as 24 and 25. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 166.] 

187 

190 x 130 mm. 

One leaf containing the end of a controversial work between a Christian and a Muslim. 
From the words of the colophon, JI^JJI ^1^1 <bU~ frv JI *J&\ J- , we may infer that it is the 
same work as that found in Bibliotheque de Manuscrits Paul Sbath, No. 1324, 2 (vol. iii., p. 112) 1 
and elsewhere. The Christian protagonist was called Ibrahim (Abraham) at-Tabarani, and his 
opponent was 'Abd ar-Rahman b. 'Abd al-Malik al-Hashimi, said to belong to the end of the 
eighth Christian century. 

The final words are : £3 ^-Jl ajjj jOc . . . ^jtfl o^l U Jc ^Ul Laiil Jl dAli J* yo Ji*j 

Jl j^JI Cr JI £f*\ li»Vlj UJj Jl^yi pdljjl <bU~ rr -^JI ob3l j^ .411 .urf ^ jlj dli cr 

Dated Wednesday, 14th of August, of the year 6816 of the Creation (a.d. 1308) and written 
by the bishop Ignatius, the name of whose diocese cannot be read with certainty. He wrote it 
for a spiritual son, Majid Sarbasi (?), who was a monk (presumably in the monastery of Mount 
Sinai) : 

^11 JU [fu>lt] tff {***• i/jfU*' fWI ^ 4 i-> ui yj^ 1 ^ l J"^ 1 j* •*-" ^ r° ^ H 

.y 4,jijij a $\ > ^.j-Ji ^ . . . ^jui -^ r j - f> ' ' ' l " Ua ^ 1 Sj *** ! ^ Uj ^ ^ ^ lj5 ^ 

A cramped Naskhi hand. No rubrications. Greek jottings by an owner at the end. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 205.] 

188 

251 x 168 mm. 204 leaves. Eighteen lines to the page. 

The theological work of the Coptic writer Safi abu Fada'il ibn 'Assal, who flourished in the 
middle of the thirteenth century. 

Title (fol. 66) : U^JI f l£*Vlj j^l >3* 

The work is divided into 2 juz's. The first juz' ends on fol. 886, as follows : 

.y JL1W3 j^JI lijj JjVI jJL-1 p? .J..JL-JI ***" ^.U> J IjjL. j£Jj 
and the second extends from fol. 89a to the end. 



1 Cf. Steinschneider, Polem. u. Apol. Lit., 1877, p. 80. 



3 o MINGANA COLLECTION 

The juz's are divided into 51 bobs, of which the first juz' has 22. The babs are sometimes 
subdivided into qisms and fash. A list of the babs is found in the introduction, ff. 56-66. 

One leaf is missing at the beginning, with the disappearance of the title and the first words of 

the text. 

The first and the last two babs begin as follows : 

Fol. 6b : l« jjLi U, A-J53I JjVI V UI 

Fol. 76 : i-juuil JUI J W^J. j r UJI a^JVI v :53l .JUI v Ul 

Fol. 1976 : ^ ^ iUlj JUI jJjIIj Ijjlj jCJl j .Oj-J-I yUl 

Fol. 200A : j^j <s j,j, jl ^JJ ^JJI 3* lo Ji^Ylj c>lilj >tll ^ .j*-^ 1 -? «P^ vV 11 

Dated Saturday, 1st of the month of Barmahat, of the year 1051 of the Martyrs, correspon- 
ding with the month of Rajab of the year 735 of the Hijrah (a.d. 1334-35) : 

jl^VI \j+d ^J\) c^J~3 (sic) Jb-I SU ol*v. >i Jjl £~JI fjt j 4->UI otfll l-i* £~i J-T 

,y : J?H ii ^ ^ u> **- -^ ^ j 1*) ^ j& <h* ^^ ?f* j. ^ ^ J 

This is probably the oldest MS. of Ibn 'Assal's important work. 

Clear and slightly bold Egyptian Naskhi. Headings in red, or occasionally in thick black 
characters. Profusely rubricated. Folios numbered in Coptic numerals. 

Half of ff . 6 and 152 has disappeared. A few words also are illegible or have disappeared 
from the last leaf and from ff. 1-2, and occasionally from some of the other leaves. 

On the title-page are inscriptions by owners, one of whom is George, son of John. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 272.] 

189 

164 x 115 mm. 

Two leaves containing (fol. 1) the index to a MS. of Mount Sinai. 

The MS. contained the following 17 headings : 

(1) Commentary by John Chrysostom on the Lord's Prayer fay»jU\ .£-*")• 

(2) Martyrdom of Bishop Dolitharius (wyj^s*) an( i his mother. 

(3) St. Athanasius, on Melchizedek. 

(4) Theodore (Studita), on the man who went from Jerusalem to Jericho (Luke x. 30). 

(5) Theodosius the Monk, on fasting. 

(6) John Chrysostom, on fasting. 

(7) St. Ephrem, on the hermits. 

(8) John Chrysostom, on fasting. 

(9) Martyrdom of Theodore in the city of Antioch. 

(10) John Chrysostom, on the prodigal son. 

(11) Jacob of Serug, on the prodigal son. 

(12) Jacob of Serug, on Dives and Lazarus. 

(13) John Chrysostom, on the ten virgins. 



ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 31 

(14) The history of the apostle Philip. 

(15) Biblical explanations by Jacob of Serug. 

(16) John Chrysostom, on the pharisee and the publican. 

(17) (Not specified) . 

Fol. 3b is wholly occupied with an inscription by Joseph, bishop of Mount Sinai, who writes 
that he sent the MS. from Mount Sinai to the monastery of St. George in Jerusalem, from which 
nobody is allowed to take it. 

On fol. 2a a later inscription states that the MS. belongs to the monastery of Mount Sinai, 
where it is read in the church of the monastery. The MS. had evidently been brought back in 
the meantime from Jerusalem to the monastery of Mount Sinai. 

No date. Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1350. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 171.] 

190 

217 x 137 mm. 1 leaf. Seventeen lines to the page. 

The beginning of the discourse of St. Ephrem on the second coming of our Lord and on the 
last judgment. 

.J*Ui\ olAJIj <ijijjJI ^$ j^i\ fjJt j rc~~JI jLi jc aSI» Jjjl ^j^M Jy j* j^j. . . . VI _* 

.jLij Jic Ji jy>_ jf-^l\ *jjlj iiy._jJI }'z jl U»- 

On the margin of fol. la is an inscription by Michael, bishop of the monastery of Mount 
Sinai, in which it is stated that the MS. belonged to the Church of our Lady of the Syrians, 
situated in the same monastery. About this Michael see also No. 212 [244]. 

No date. A bold and clear Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1350. Heading in red. Rubricated. 
Geometrical pattern at the beginning. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 221.] 

191 

205 x 154 mm. 13 leaves. Generally from sixteen to eighteen lines to the page. 

A treatise on the significance of the Church, and of the wearing-apparel of the priests during 
divine service, of the Eucharistic Elements, of the Holy Baptism, and of the monastic garb, 
by St. Basil of Caesarea. 

ii^Jl ^ uy^xll <A»- 1*} (j-jJUil jt-i-l ^_j ojaJI -L~ ixll ^ Jll»j (*-o.j >~~*J • . . {sic) oVU— 1 

Begins : i-l 4II J^* &* <~J$3l 

On fol. 12a is a special heading for Baptism : 

No date. Written in an early Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1350. Many diacritical points 

missing. No rubrications. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 152.] 



3* MINGANA COLLECTION 

192 

205 x rj8 mm. 2 leaves, forming part of a large volume. Fourteen and fifteen lines to 
the page. 

The loaves contain a praise of virginity. 

Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. 

'Hie first extant words are : ^Jbl j^ U <*> jL, 43 jV 4JI *4»"U ly>_ jl lj>J\ a~I>i 

No date. Clear and bold Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1400. No rubrications. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 164.] 

193 

203 x 145 mm. 2 leaves. 

The leaves were culled from a MS., apparently of Mount Sinai. They contain the index to 
the treatises found in that MS., which are : 
(r) The holy Incarnation of God. 

(2) The life of St. Clement, disciple of St. Peter. 

(3) Treatise of Dorotheus on obedience. 

(4) Lives of the Fathers. 

(5) The story of the garments of our Lord. 
((>) A discourse by Isaac, possibly of Nineveh. 

(7) Extracts from the advices of Abbot Isaiah. 

(8) The history of Napharoius (sic) (cryjj*). 

(9) A prayer helpful to the faithful. 

(10) A discourse by St. Anastasius on the Transfiguration. 

(11) The last book of St. Clement, disciple of St. Peter. 

(12) The glorification of the angels. 

(13) Commentary by St. Chrysostom. 

(14 The explanation of what God told Moses, in which are included extracts from the 

Booh of Medicine (w-U I J^$ V-0 • 

On fol. 1 a is an undated note of reading by a monk. 

No date. A Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1450. Headings in red. I altered the order of the 
leaves, which were misplaced by the binder. ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

194 

iT\ x 126 mm. 1 leaf. 

The leaf was torn from a MS. of the monastery of Mount Sinai, and contains the end of 

a parenetical discourse. 

The first extant words are : ^Wl U.JI V, ^Ul Jc *JI ^ V dial r > ^Jl V, 

On the reverse of the leaf is a long inscription written by the monk Ephrem, bishop of Qara 

,. .. .„..-,* 11 .1. J| : J»U), to the effect that he gave the MS. as waqf to the monks of 



ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 33 

the monastery of Mount Sinai, " who dwell in the monastery of St. Moses, in Sinai, the Mountain 
of God. 

No date. A Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1450. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 187.] 

195 

212 x 137 mm. 2 leaves. 

The leaves were culled from a MS. containing theological and Biblical matter. 
Fol. ia is blank. 

On fol. ib are two inscriptions by readers, of about a.d. 1450. 
Fol. 2. Fourteen lines to the page. The first extant words are : 

No date. A bold Naskhi hand of about A.D. 1450. Rubricated. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 202.] 

196 

188 x 142 mm. 2 leaves. Fifteen lines to the page. 

The leaves were culled from a MS. containing Christ ological matter, and explaining the 
Economy of our Lord. 

Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. 
The first extant words are : 



a.d. 1500. Leaves numbere 
[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 250/ 



No date. A not very handsome Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1500. Leaves numbered in 
Coptic numerals as 34 and 35. 



197 

222 x 156 mm. 1 leaf. Sixteen lines to the page. 

The leaf was culled from a MS., and contains the end of a parenetical discourse. Incomplete 
at the beginning and at the end. 

The first extant words are : juVi l\J- JU\ *[JU\ J, JU)| r LU! 
No date. Egyptian Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1500" 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 160.] 

198 

205 x 147 mm. 2 leaves. Twelve lines to the page. 

A fragment from the discourse of Cyriacus, bishop of Bahnasa, on the Passion of our Lord 
and the Lament of the Virgin. See No. 260 [261] B, and the references found there. 
No date. Bold and handsome Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1500. Rubricated. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 269.] 

«5 



34 MINGANA COLLECTION 

199 

218 x 164 mm. 1 leaf. Fourteen lines to the page. 

The leaf formed part of a voluminous MS. on Christological subjects, and deals with the 
descent of our Lord into Hades. 

The first extant words are : JojjuJI .lyVl c^—- k ^ ^J» -t**^ 9 <y 

No date. Egyptian Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1550. Well rubricated. Numbered in 

Coptic numerals as 134. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 157.] 

200 

188 x 139 mm. 2 leaves. Fifteen and sixteen lines to the page. 

Two metrical pieces, or zajallydt, containing parenetical matter. 

Incomplete at the beginning and at the end, and forming part of a larger volume. 

The second piece begins (fol xb) : t/-u)l J*j\ Jl alyll j>- 

No date. A Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1600. No lubrications. Folios numbered in 
Coptic numerals as 221 and 222. 

On fol. ia, Satan is called " Satanayil." 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 162.] 

201 

217 x 160 mm. 4 leaves. Seventeen or fourteen lines to the page. 
A discourse in the form of a prayer on a newly-baptised person. 

Incomplete at the beginning and at the end, and something is missing between ff . 1-2, as the 
first leaf appears to be culled from a different MS. 

The final words are : ol»VI *+*- j* S^j &\y\ t/yj n*>*j 

No date. Clear and bold Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1650. Rubricated. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 270.] 

202 

215 x 153 mm. 2 leaves. Eighteen lines to the page. 

The leaves contain the beginning of the sermons of John Chrysostom. 

Begins : ,**— J jl Uic ^ <l\ J JjVl &JI . . . ^aJJI J U»-_y_ ^.^ i»e\y v_^£ . . . ^Vl **- 

Something is missing between ff. 1-2. 

No date. A clear Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1700. Headings in red. Well rubricated. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 252.] 

203 

164 x 114 mm. 10 leaves. Twelve lines to the page. 
The book of the Didascalia. 



ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 35 

Ff. ia-3b contain the index of the 39 chapters {bdbs) into which the book is divided. Of 
all these bdbs the MS. contains only the introduction to the work, and the beginning of the first 
bdb. 

The text exhibited in the MS. may be said to be similar to that found in MS. No. 40 of 
Catalogue, vol. ii., pp. 42-44. 

The index, which is by the same hand as the rest of the MS., is dated (fol. 46) month of 
Amshfr, 1538 1 of the Martyrs (a.d. 1822). 

.\ota X* djUl jj^\ j& j . . . \jff J^\ jaJi ^\} 3 ^\ y y\ ^^ ^ 

Clear Egyptian Naskhi. Headings in red. Well rubricated. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 260.] 



VII. 
MYSTICISM 

204 

160 x 120 mm. 1 leaf. Fifteen lines to the page. Vellum. 

The beginning of a discourse by St. Ephrem, on the fact that a monk should never smile 
nor rejoice, but should always weep and lament over himself. 

Begins : L-^Jlj dU^JI y» v-^IJI ^ ^l>- Jjl 

No date. An early Christian Kufi hand of about a.d. 850-900. Headings in red. Crude 
geometrical pattern at the beginning. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 132.] 

205 

208 x 143 mm. 1 leaf. Eighteen lines to the page. 
A leaf culled from a MS. containing mystical matter. 

The first extant words are : jLwJlj JUI ULil ^jA\ ***• J^i* <JV .j£ \yaj 
The word " apostle " is ^JUI , from the Syriac )L— X» , and the word for " possession " is 
jLull , from the Syriac ) 1 . 10 . 

Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. 

No date. A Christian Kufi hand of about a.d. 950. Rubricated. Full stops are marked 
by squares in red with a black dot, and the more general sections by four black dots surrounded 
by four red ones. 
[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 207.] 

1 Written in Coptic numerals. 



7th. 



36 MINGANA COLLECTION 

206 . 

Two leaves culled from two different MSS. 

A 

Fol I. iqo x 137 mm. Fifteen lines to the page. 

A leaf containing the end of one mystical treatise and the beginning of another, called the 

The heading on the reverse is : U j ^ of. V; o_\j. jUVI ^ V jl gL- ^ ^1 Wj 

.JUL- aS jjju V y *\ Jt-VI y^T ^ Jf * "^-^ 
No date. A Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1500. Headings in red. 

B 

Fol. 2. 188 x 144 mm. Fifteen lines to the page. ,, , xl . - u w u 

A leaf containing the end of one sermon and the beginning of another, called the 6th, which 

is on baptism. V1 v . 

The heading on the obverse is: ^.i-JI j Ut it* r U-lj UV1 ^ C JJJ ^•* 1 - 5 ** n 

.U& ^ ^ 5UVI J *1 aU» *Aj UU-J cJ ^ i> ^ • • - 
No date. A Naskhi hand, resembling a late ornamental Kufi, of about a.d. 1000. Rub- 
ricated - [Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 193.] 

207 

285 x 230 mm. 2 leaves. Two columns to the page. Twenty or twenty-one lines to the 
column. Vellum. 

A treatise on mysticism. 

The following headings in red are found in it : 

Fol. xa : On the fear of the Lord : 

£1 ^ Jly ^ ^ jV <~i j** uj)\ J?1 .yjl *** u c 
Fol. 16 : On alms : , 

The text does not seem to be continuous between the two leaves. 
No date. Clear and bold Naskhi hand of about a.d. iioo. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 129.] 

208 

171 x 127 mm. 8 leaves. Sixteen lines to the page. 

Thick vellum and palimpsest, of which both the upper- and the under-writing are in Arabic. 

UPPER-WRITING 

Sayings of the Fathers of the Desert, and anecdotes concerning them. 

.jwjjill AVI Jlyl J^ 



ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 37 

Often the work proceeds by way of question and answer. The main headings are : "A 
brother asked " (JL £l), " An old man said " (^ Jtf), and " The old men said " (^Jl IjllS). 

Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. 
The Fathers whose sayings are quoted are : 
(i) Abbot Macarius (fol. jo). 

(2) Arsenius (fol. lb). 

(3) Poemen (fol. lb). 

(4) Poemen (fol. 20). 

(5) Abbot Moses (fol. 20). 

(6) Muthues (fol. 26). 

(7) Muthues (fol. 3«). 

(8) Magatis (or Megathius, as in Catalogue, vol. ii., p. 103). 

(9) Abbot Agathon (fol. 46). 
(10) Poemen (fol. 4b). 

(n) Ammon (fol. 4b). 

(12) Poemen (fol. 50). 

(13) Poemen (fol. 56). 

(14) Macarius (fol. 6#). 

(15) Paul the Simple (fol. ja). 

No date. Written in an early Christian Naskhi hand of about A.D. 1100. Headings in red. 
Well rubricated. The lower right-hand corners are torn, with the disappearance of some words 
or half-words. 

UNDER-WRITING 

A historical work, probably consisting of lives of saints. 
No date. Christian Kufi. hand of about A.D. 800-830. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 153.] 

209 

184 x T20 mm. 2 fragmentary leaves. Twenty-two lines to the page. Vellum. 

They contain a mystical work, in which an old monk called " the Shaikh " is teaching the 
ways of the monastic life to a young monk. 

Incomplete at the beginning and at the end, but as Mount Sinai (IL- j» is mentioned in 
the text (fol. 2a), it may be inferred that the work was written in that monastery. 

No date. Early Naskhi hand of about A.D. 1150. Diacritical points. The edges of both 
leaves are much damaged, and many words have disappeared from them. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 146.] 

210 

230 x 155 mm. 

A leaf culled from a MS. of Mount Sinai, and containing the beginning of a volume of letters 
of the Abbot Macarius to some of his fellow-monks. 

Begins : £-1 Jfll ju- . jUj ly*\ Jl (sic) «W *)Uj cfy.J^ ^n-^ 1 ^ : V . . . v"^ f-s 



38 MINGANA COLLECTION 

At the top of the page is an inscription by Sim'an (Simon), bishop of Mount Sinai, to the 
effect that the MS. belongs to the monks of the monastery of Mount Sinai. From the following 
No. 21 1 [214], and from No. 243 [234], we know that this Bishop Simon flourished at the 
beginning of the thirteenth Christian century. 

No date. A Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1200. Headings in red. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 194.] 

211 

261 x 165 mm. 

One leaf culled from a MS. of the monastery of Mount Sinai. 

It contains the end of a mystical work and the colophon of the MS., which gives the date 
Wednesday, 10th of August, of the year 6724 of the Creation, and the 10th of Rabi' II of the 
year a.h. 613 (a.d. 1216). The copyist was the monk Ilyas, and he wrote in the time of the 
Archimandrite Sim'an (Simon), the bishop of the monastery of Mount Sinai : 

Naskhi. Some rubrications. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 214.] 

212 

273 x 184 mm. 4 leaves. Twenty lines to the page. 

The second " century " of the book of six mystical " centuries " of Evagrius. Incomplete 
at the beginning. 

The MS. begins with the end of the 76th aphorism, as follows : 

The beginning of the 77th aphorism is : 

The subscription is : 

ojiai* JI2- jT" aL*. J>y>_ (^JJI jLi-lj jy JT ^Ull jyM . . . >_>VI -**» oldl iUI oj^ 1 

The aphorisms of the " century " are counted in Abjad numbering. 

No date. A clear and bold Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1300. Headings in red. Well 
rubricated. 

On fol. 4a is an inscription by Michael, bishop of the monastery of Mount Sinai, to the 
effect that the MS. is a waqf to the Church of our Lady of the Syrians situated in that monastery. 
About this Michael see also No. 190 [221]. 

On fol. 4b is a note of reading by another monk, Michael, of the same monastery. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 244.] 



ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 39 

213 

174 x 132 mm. 2 leaves. Eleven lines to the page. 

The leaves were culled from a MS. dealing with monasticism and mysticism. Incomplete 
at the beginning and at the end. 

The first extant words are : U ^J j^->- U j» ^ys J& j^» J^j dJD U .iiV jj. l-l^J **-j 

No date. A clear and slightly bold Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1350. The different parts 
of the sentences are indicated by thick inverted commas in red. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 242.] 

214 

246 x 170 mm. 1 leaf. Sixteen lines to the page. 

The leaf seems to have been culled from the end of a MS. containing mystical matter. 

The final words are : «~~JI ^X aS ^JJt «~~JI y*j j^-Ij JL,j jV Ljjj j^*~.:r V jSIj L*l JU^ 

.jv.1 jytjl Jul Jlj Uaj jVI 

No date. A Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1400. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 218.] 

215 

206 x 141 mm. 6 leaves. Seventeen lines to the page. 
Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. 

The leaves were apparently culled from a large volume dealing with mystical and theological 
matter. 

A 

Ff. ia-46 contain the end of the story of a highway robber in the time of the emperor 
Anastasius, who repented and was accepted by God. 

The first extant words are : jS jjs» jL» <iV <uii orU ^Ji-VI a) JU> .oU oy» &\ 

B 

Ff. 4&-6& : A collection of mystical and parenetical advices. 
Headed : <«ili aLs&jL oLI »i* 

Begins : dU. idUyo ^^r }U MX ~~sir V jVjJI *-Vl \+\ 

No date. Clear and bold Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1400. No rubrications. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 170.] 

216 

200 x 122 mm. 

A leaf containing the index to a MS. of the monastery of Mount Sinai, on mysticism. 

Among the subjects discussed are : 



4 o MINGANA COLLECTION 

(i) St. Basil, on mysticism. 

(2) The advices of the Abbot Isaiah for novices. 

(3) The letter of the Abbot Moses to the Abbot Poemen. 

(4) Sayings of the " teachers " and of John Chrysostom. 

(5) A discourse by St. Ephrem. 

(6) Sayings of the Fathers. 

(7) The Abbot Mark, on law (j" r llll Jc). 

(8) A discourse by the same Abbot Mark, on those who believe that they are not performing 

their obligations. 

(9) A discourse by Theophilus, on the soul leaving the body. 
(10) St. Ephrem, on Noah. 

(n) The prescriptions of the Abbot Ammon. 

(12) Sayings of John Climacus. 

(13) Life of the Abbot Mark of Tharmaqa. 

(14) Life of St. Yatnanus ((?) c/y^ s)- 

(15) Life of " the man of God " or St. Alexius. 

(16) Miracles of St. Basil. 

At the end of the index is an inscription by a later hand, to the effect that the MS. belongs 

to the monks of the monastery of Mount Sinai, for whom it is read in the church of the monastery. 

A Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1450. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 184.] 

217 

188 x 136 mm. 

A leaf culled from a MS., apparently of the monastery of Mount Sinai. 

It contains exhortations to monks. The first extant words are : 

No date. Clear Naskhi hand of about A.D. 1450. Any time the name of Christ occurs 
there is the sign of the Cross over the letter Sin. The Sin in any other word has a sign resembling 

the number seven over it. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 179.] 

218 

204 x 139 mm. Nineteen lines to the page. 

A leaf culled from a MS. containing good advices for a monk about his food, dress and 
prayers. So far as his dress is concerned he is advised not to ask for fine and coloured clothes, 
and thus resemble women who adorn themselves with strange adornments, and colour their cheeks 

and hair (**jy-j ***JJ*- Ciy^Si • 

The first extant words are : Lb otull 1* <J» Jli-1 la* Jc ^all 

No date. A clear Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1500. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 246.] 



ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 41 

219 

205 x 140 mm. 

A leaf containing the last two lines of a MS., presumably of the monastery of Mount Sinai. 

At the bottom of the page is an inscription by the monk Macarius, who, taking his theme 
from the contents of the MS., exhorts the reader to good works, and advises him not to embrace 
monasticism lightly. This monk Macarius is not the same as that mentioned in No. 160 [154]. 

No date. A Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1500. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 176.] 
220 

210 x 131 mm. 1 leaf. Eleven lines to the page. 

The leaf was culled from a MS. apparently of the monastery of Mount Sinai. 

It contains the end of the 16th and the beginning of the 17th chapter of a work on mysticism. 

The beginning of the 17th chapter is : 

The monks for whom the work was written must have been Greeks and not Syrians, because 
in the text mention is made of the Greek hymns called rpoTrdpta. 

No date. A clear and handsome Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1500. Headings in red. Well 
rubricated. Many vowels. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 185.] 
221 

295 x 203 mm. 1 leaf. Nineteen lines to the page. 

The leaf was culled from a MS. apparently of the monastery of Mount Sinai. It contains the 
title-page and the beginning of the Scala Paradisi of John Climacus, who died in 649. 

Title: \^ x UI jwsll j JjJU \L,\ uA\r UJUI v ui J ^ UJ1 &*3 *Kjd\ *JUI JjUl r Ju- v b" 

The work has a preface resembling that of a genuine Arabic book : 

.^Vl pL- s* >li-l ^i^-aJI |j> jl ju, UI . . . yjl oU-ji Jl lilij ^Jdl jui-l 

No date. ^ A handsome Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1550. Headings in red. Well rubricated. 
A Greek inscription of three lines at the top of the title-page states that the MS. belonged 
to the library of the monastery of Mount Sinai. 

I altered the position of the leaf, which had been misplaced by the binder. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 209.] 

222 

220 x 159 mm. 6 leaves. Twenty-one lines to the page. 

Ff. 1-5& : The end of a mystical work, apparently the Scala Paradisi of the above John 
Climacus. 

Ends: 4)1 ^» JUJIj \j£\ \ A \£\ l^J\, ^ ^ J yi ^j\ |j^ ^ j| oLp _,_, ^^. j -| 

.>! UJfjyuJI 4, 1 Jl j^JI <J ^JJI 



42 MINGANA COLLECTION 

Something is missing between ff. 3-4. 

Dated Tuesday, 18th of May, a.d. 1770, and written by Ibrahim, son of Moses Bedaru, 
who states that he compared it with another MS. : 

j£ . . . 6^3 <J&-I J& . . . jU \a j ^1 J^ <~.U1 p*Ul] Ir^jl jW <^U <JLT jtfj i-^^ 

.jv*! .»«A33l IJl* y»-L» U>-_y_ ^oSJlj £B«-Jl f>*t' <*-a>- 

A later inscription written under the colophon states that the MS. was bought from its 
owner, the above Ibrahim, by Jar jura al-Fari. 

Fol. 6 contains an illustration of the efficacy of baptism, from the case of the impotent man 
of the Gospel, who could not go into the pool (John v. 7). 

A clear and handsome Naskhi hand. Headings in red. Well rubricated. Broad margins. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 249.] 

223 

210 x 151 mm. 

A leaf containing the title-page and the index to the mystical works of the Syrian author, 

Isaac of Antioch, who died about a.d. 460. 

It is stated that the translator was 'Abdallah b. Fadl Antaki, who died in a.d. 1052, and that 
he translated these mystical works of Isaac from Greek. They had evidently been previously 
translated from Syriac into Greek. 

. jwi\ ji«!i #i ^ l -v v.^- 11 ^ ^ v^ 1 ^ cy Wry • • • Jy* 11 o* 

No date. A Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1600. Headings in red. The obverse contains a 

note of reading by Ilyas, son of Joseph, from Syria. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 201.] 

224 

220 x 151 mm. 2 leaves. Sixteen lines to the page. 

The leaves were culled from a mystical MS. The first extant words are : 

The text between ff. 1 and 2 is not continuous. 

No date. Bold Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1600. Profusely rubricated. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 191.] 

225 

217 x 149 mm. 1 leaf. Seventeen lines to the page. 

The leaf was culled from a MS., and contains the end of the Vision of Carpus. 

The final words are : 

.4-1 4I «*Jl.j ill* J I *r ^ S-aU I4JI Jju*!j li\ \&~* ^\ ^ jU-VI 0I4J .iU-l ^a \j\Ji\ J ^UJl 



ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 43 

The word Jesus is written py*} . 

No date. A Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1600. , . _ _ - 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 192.] 

226 

219 x 161 mm. 1 leaf. Fifteen lines to the page. 

The leaf was culled from a MS. of the monastery of Mount Sinai, and containing the end of 
a mystical work. 

The final words are : ^jUII ^ Jit Ulj . . . SjJlj ^ «1 <pM jft>*- fi M ^ LJI £* 1 ^ 

No date. A Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1750. 

An inscription in modern Greek at the bottom of the page states that the MS. was brought 

from Egypt to the monastery of Mount Sinai. , , , 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 190.] 



VIII 
PHILOSOPHY 

227 

269 x 185 mm. 1 leaf. Twenty-two lines to the page. 
The leaf was the last leaf of a MS. from which it was culled. 

The work from which the leaf was culled dealt with the soul in its relation to its body and 
knowledge in general. 

Incomplete at the beginning. ' 
The last words are : 

.,>! >l jv.1 jytjJI all Jlj ay Jj jVl . . . >!!j jl^JI <1 tfill $\ J} ^s Jb~ dlrtt Jl ^U 

No date. A clear and slightly bold Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1350. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 247.] 

228 

249 x 155 mm. 

The last leaf, With the colophon, of a MS. containing the work of the philosopher LuqmSn, 
who is identified with Hermes rpuTfieytaros. 

It is stated that the time of the philosopher Luqman, or Hermes, was 5070 of the Creation 
(438 B.C.). 



1 Sic Cod. Is it possible to read <Ja.)l ? The sentence <Ja.ll ,^XJ\ would then exactly render the Greek rpioiUyu 



44 M1NGANA COLLECTION 

It is stated also that the MS. from which the leaf was culled was dated 901 of the Hijrah 

(a.d. 1495) : °j*4& **9-lj *)* £■* ^ jH-3 

An inscription under the colophon states that an owner, 'Azar, bought the MS. from Musa 

al-'Ajami in Qara-Amed in 7037 of the Creation (a.d. 1529). 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 253.] 

IX 
SCIENCE 

229 

204 x 131 mm. 2 leaves. Sixteen lines to the page. 

The leaves contain part of the astronomical and astrological work attributed to the prophet 

Daniel. 

See No. 259 [135]. 

Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. 

The months represented here are : end of January, all February, and about half of March. 

February begins : jf j y»j jUl +? Jt ..Ujil <~<M\* j)jf <?3j\ ^x 03j*3 V U -^ 

No date. A Christian Kufi hand of about a.d. 950. Headings in red. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 204.] 

230 

231 x 157 mm. , 

A leaf containing the names of some stars of the signs of the Zodiac for each month of the 

year according to the Coptic Church. 

On the reverse is a short Armenian inscription, followed by a longer Arabic note dealing with 

the finding of the quarters of the moon. 

No date. A Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1550. Red ink predominates. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 223.] 

X 
HISTORY 

231 

218 x 180 mm. 4 leaves. From fifteen to seventeen lines to the page. Vellum. 

A 
Fol. 1 : The story of the Invention of the Holy Cross by the Empress Helena. 
The leaf contains the dialogue between the Empress and the Jewish Rabbi called Judas 
(Yahuda), on the exact spot of Golgotha where the wood of the Cross should be found. 



ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 45 

Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. The first extant words are : 

,C~& jWl IS*. I4J JU .jyU\ j-UJI y^ w^3» O* <U ° ; ^ ■** 

The leaf is undoubtedly culled from MS. No. 91 A, page 121, of Catalogue, vol. ii. (</•?'•)• ft* 

the sequence of the story it should have been placed between ff. 1 and 2, although the text is not 
continuous on either side of it, as there is still a lacuna in the narrative. 

The folio is numbered 12 in Coptic numerals. This number is surrounded by ornamentations, 
and indicates quires and not pages. 

No date. For description see No. 91 of Catalogue, vol. ii., p. 122, where perhaps (he dale 
" about a.d. 830 " may be changed into " about a.d. 830-880." 

B 

Ff. 2-4 : The history of the Apostle Philip, and his evangelisation of Carthage Q^r^ J) • 

The leaves are here also culled from MS. No. 91 C, page 121, of Catalogue, vol. ii., and should 
be placed between ff. 4 and 5 of that MS., as the text is continuous with the final words of fol. 4b. 

Fol. 4 is numbered 12 in Arabic numerals, but as this number is surrounded by ornamenta- 
tions, we may presume that it indicates the beginning of a quire or half a quire. 

No date. For description see, as above, MS. No. 91, p. 122 of Catalogue, vol. ii. 

I altered the arrangement of the leaves of this MS., which were misplaeed by the binder. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 14c). | 

232 

214 x 177 mm. 1 leaf. Seventeen and eighteen lines to the page. Vellum. 
A leaf of the Martyrdom of St. George under the king Dadyanus (<j"y lib) . 
Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. The text begins abruptly : 

.Ui <-» j\J *Jb j&JI Jl jjL» j^- **J\ »Lm* «*i*}3 ^> <-^i *\*j> u" ji\,J>\j* j*\ *' 

No date. Written in an early Christian Kufi hand of about a.d. 850-880. Diacritical points. 
No rubrications. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 147.] 

233 

200 x 122 mm. 1 leaf. Seventeen lines to the page. Vellum. 

The leaf contains an anecdote about Peter, bishop of Sebaste, and of a visit paid to him by 
his brother, St. Basil of Caesarea. 

As the edges of the leaf are torn away, with the consequent disappearance of many words 
no complete lines can be transcribed from it. 

No date. Early Christian Kufi hand of about a.d. 880-900. Heading in red. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. iju.J 



, MINGANA COLLECTION 

46 

234 

Curiously enough, the Arabic word for « Apostate » is, in the story, ^ jl , from the Synac 



Rome. 



The page begins abruptly : ^ 



235 



210 x 146 mm. 1 leaf. Seventeen and eighteen lines to the page. 

The leaf was culled from a MS. containing the beginning of pious anecdotes. 

The story deals with a merchant and a poor man whom he met man inn 

Begins: ^ J, *J. ^ ^ *- * # * * ** ^ ^ * * J ** ^ .^ 

r^Tchristian Kufi hand of about A.P. 95c Headings in red. Some geometrical 
patterns at the beginning. [Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 200.] 

236 

210 x 147 mm. 1 leaf. Nineteen lines to the page. v** rt li«a 

The LfwaTculled from a MS., and contains the beginning of the mar yrdom of St. Natohus, 
or Anatolius, who was of Persian parentage, and was martyied under Diocle lan. 

Begins : jC *ll ^ Jl ^^ -^ - •&> M ^ M *>' *"> ^ =f* 

Incomplete at the end. . , 

No date. A Christian Kufi hand of about a.d. 950. Heading in red .,. c , 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 195. J 

237 

210 x138 mm. 1 leaf. Twenty-one lines to the page. Jeltaa. 

The leaf contains the confirmation of the fact that Jesus Christ is God hm l . ^torj ^"* e 
conversion of Jews in Ifriqiyah and Cartagena in the time of Herachus, emperor of Constantinople. 



ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 47 

j-j^JI ~jj) «U ** JjVI J&\ M yj! y gj-Jl £j~- jl jU^ t ^ tf^j 4" Jr: <^-V • • * 

The story is told by a converted Jew called Joseph, and by his son called Sim'un (=* Hcb. 

Shim'un). 

Incomplete at the end, which is found in the following No. 238 [ I 75l- 

No date. Written in' an early Christian Kufi hand of about a.d. 950. The heading is in 

red. The edges of the leaf are damaged by damp, and some words on them are illegible. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 144.J 

238 

214 x 142 mm. 1 leaf. 

The end of a story of the conversion of Jacob, the head of the Jewish community of 
Cartagena, and other Jews, at the hand of George al-Abrakh, in the time of the emperor 
Heraclius. The story was written by Joseph, and his son Sim'un (= Heb. Shim'un). 

See the beginning of the story in the preceding No. 237 [144]. 

dU jl»j j U».U»Ji J j^is cSJdl j^JI j-lj yjS» jc .U>-U,yj AJt,Jt\ J *j5 ^\ v*^ 1 '^* r r 

No date. An early and clear Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1100. Well rubricated. On the 
obverse are two inscriptions by readers, one of whom was called Michael and the other Ilyas 

(Elias). 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 175.] 

239 

223 x 162 mm. 1 leaf. Sixteen lines to the page. Vellum. 

The leaf contains the end of the life of the emperor Jovian, in connection with a miracle 
performed on a sick girl. 

The name of the emperor is given as i/yU^ , in the same way as it is often written by 

the Syrian historians. 

It is rightly said at the end that the emperor died in 675, evidently of the Greeks, which 
corresponds with a.d. 364. 

Incomplete both at the beginning and at the end. The first extant words are : 

Dated the month of Tut, the night of Saturday of the feast of the Resurrection, which is one 
day before (sic) the feast of the Crucifixion of the year 716 2 (in Coptic numerals), probably of 



1 Perhaps a mistake for lj u*JS , as in No. 238 [175]. 

2 In Coptic numerals. If, however, the Coptic numerals are to be read as 316, as seems possible, the year would bo 
316 of the Hijrah, which corresponds with a.d. 928. Palaeographically, this date seems to be more in harmony with the 
Arabic writing on the leaf. 



48 MINGANA COLLECTION 

the Martyrs, which corresponds with a.d. iooo, and written by Sa'id, son of Stephanus (Stephen) 
Mardan : 

\[v\\] «u. ^ fJ - .JUM Juc Ji 4.12)1 Jue o-Ji <U oy >^ J «iUij • • • j^ 

Is it possible that the word Ji , before, is a copyist's error for *. , a/ter. 

Early Christian Kufi hand. No rubrications. The full sentences are divided by one black 

dot, and the half-sentences by two horizontal dots. The sections, which might correspond with 

our' paragraphs, are divided by four dots, two vertical and two horizontal. I altered the position 

of the leaf , which was misplaced by the binder. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 143. J 

240 

208 x 140 mm. 1 leaf. Seventeen lines to the page. 

The leaf is culled from a MS. containing lives of many saints or the life of John the Baptist 
alone. It gives the explanation of Luke i. 17 : " and he shall go before him in the spirit and 

power of Elias." 

No date. Written in a cramped Christian Kufi hand, bordering on Naskhi, of about A.D. 

1000. No rubrications. ^ . . .,, nAl 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 230.] 

241 

169 x 132 mm. 1 leaf. Twelve lines to the page. 

The MS. from which the leaf was culled apparently contained pious anecdotes. The 
anecdote told in the leaf deals with three brothers who left Alexandria in order to repair to the 
sanctuary of St. Marcian, and while resting and eating by the river one of them was eaten by 
a crocodile. 

The first extant words are : jU^ ^j&\ ^ p J*\j} J& U S^VI M cf -A o* ^ U ° b 

No date. An early and bold Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1050. Headings in red. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 232.] 

242 

202 x 162 mm. 1 leaf. Vellum. 

A title-page of a MS. of the library of Mount Sinai, containing lives of saints. 

Headed : IL- j> & ^A o* fV* «=*W.1 u*^> s\r ^ $ > JliUil •^ ^ ^ ^ r- 

At the bottom of the page are two lines of Greek scribblings. 

No date. Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1050. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 128.] 

243 

260 x 170 mm. 8 leaves. Seventeen lines to the page. 

The leaves were culled from a hagiographical and mystical MS. belonging to the monastery 
of Mount Sinai. 



ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 49 

The headings on ff. 1-5 are called mas'alahs, and deal with hagiographical matter, while 
ff. ya-Sa contain mystical matter derived from sentences in the Pauline Epistles and the Gospels, 
according to a commentary by an early Father. A lacuna between ff. 6 and 7 separates the two 
subjects, which seem to emanate from a single MS. As to fol. 6, it belongs to the same MS., 
but contains the life of St. Marina. 

The more important items in the MS. are : 

A 
Ff. ia-2a : The martyrdom of St. Abinus, or Ababmus (j-yJ or iry-U). Incomplete at 
the beginning. 

B 

Ff. 2a-$a : The martyrdom of the five notables massacred after St. Abinus. 

Begins : dU^! dUUl Jl» L f^L\ lA+z c~ U .lij Cr Jl j**J\ J ly.1 ^.AJI Jl^l <~J-I <iw 

C 

Ff. 3^-56 : The martyrdom of the nine men massacred after the above five notables. In- 
complete at the end. 

The names of the nine martyrs may have been found in the text, and each one of them may 
have formed the subject of a mas'alah. Only four mas'alahs are now extant, and they deal 
with the martyrs Glaucus {^^), Seleucus ( ( _ r 5>-), the carpenter, Thelalius (cr^), the son of 
the carpenter, Menalius (wyM*), and Eutyches (^^fjl), the head of the gaolers. 

Begins : a,U?Ij ^J^i <lc Ji-ati <ikJI ^\ JI^V^ f 1 -^ ^U^ -*-..? . J'^Vl -u JUjI k-il ill— 



D 

Fol. 6 : The life of St. Marina (UjU). Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. The 
first extant words are : jZS -j\>- ^j^ *+ic J-** d-US J *x*if ^'j*^ 0^ u* v^*.-* lt*-^ o* 9 **^ 

Dated (fol. 8b) Friday, 25th of June, of the year 6729 of the Creation (a.d. 1221), and written 
in the monastery of Mount Sinai by the monk Agathon in the time of the Abbot Sim'an (Simon), 
the bishop of the monastery : 

A clear and slightly bold Naskhi hand. Headings in red. Well rubricated. Fairly broad 

margins. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 234.] 

4 



50 MINGANA COLLECTION 

244 

184 x 132 mm. 2 leaves. Unequal number of lines to the page. Vellum 

A 

Fol. la : The final leaf of a MS. containing the last words of a story. These words are : 
J^^ilj j.^JI_5 JLi}\ Jl #tS _ii ^Jj ^Ji Zjj j-^j • ^%- fj^Ai r?jS. «3^ u* ^• 1 ^ -^' 

.Jul ^IjJl ^ Jlj jVI 
No date. Early Christian Kufi hand of about a.d. 950. 

B 

Fol. xa : The index of the lives of saints and patristic literature found in the MS. from which 
the leaves were culled. 

Some of the items from the index are : 

16th : The discourse of St. Ephrem, on the end of the world : 

19th : The history of St. Christophorus (Christopher) : ^fj^j- l^» ,jZ* L; 

20th : The history of St. Theodoret, the prophet : (S A\ ^jIjjjJ -cf-j^ 

21st : The history of St. Philotheus, the martyr : o»Ul (j-jlryJ l^» -cy-j^i • to "'j 

C 

Ff. ib-2a, : A story containing the testimony of John the Physician to Ibn abi Husain, the 
Governor of Farrirah (Andalusia). 

Headed : Ijji i_*»-L* j\-J-l ^1 j>l ^.J* , J- 1 ti>-^»_ !ol^ 

The scene is set in Sicily (<!£-) . 

Cramped Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1300. 

These leaves, which were left blank in the original MS. containing the matter described under 
A, seem to have been filled up by a later hand. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 142.] 

245 

163 x 116 mm. 4 leaves. Fourteen lines to the page. 

The leaves were culled from a MS. containing the sayings and the lives of the Fathers of the 
Desert. 

The name of Abbot Apollo is found on fol. 2, and that of Abbot Moses on fol. 4. 

Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. 

The writing on fol. ia is slightly dim. 

The leaves seem to be the last ones of the MS. from which they were culled. The final leaf, 
however, is missing, as may be seen from the following words which mark the end of fol. 46 : 



ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 51 

No date. A clear and slightly bold Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1300. The different parts of 
the sentences are indicated by a red dot with a black dot in the middle. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 255.] 

246 

172 x 125 mm. 2 leaves. Nineteen lines to the page. 

The leaves are all that remain from a hagiographical MS. They contain the martyrdom of 
the Arab nobleman al-Harith b. Ka'b (<jT ^.1 ojU-i), of 4250 other men, women and children 

martyred with him, and of his own wife Dahdan, daughter of Arma' (~jl cJ» jl-uo), who was 
martyred after him. 

Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. The first extant words are : 

Al-Harith is the man called by Western hagiographers Arethas, and was martyred in Najran 
by the Jewish king Dhu Nuwas, in the first half of the sixth Christian century. 
No date. A cramped Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1300. No rubrications. 



[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 236.] 



247 

206 x 147 mm. 8 leaves. Twelves lines to the page. 



Ff. i-6b : An account given by the Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite on the visit of St. Paul 
to Athens in the fourteenth year after the Resurrection. 

Dionysius speaks in the narrative in the first person, and gives also an account of what he 
himself did in Athens. He informs us on fol. 56 that he was converted by St. Paul, with a woman 
called Damaris (Acts xvii. 34), and that he was ordained bishop by the Apostle. 

Incomplete at the beginning, and so bears no title. 

From the way in which the treatise ends, and from the indication of the treatise which follows 
it, we infer that it was read in the church at the 6th hour of Good Friday. 

The end of the treatise, with its colophon in which all this is made clear, is as follows : 

Jl ju:*:L~. ULXJ C»li A^. \MjJ i-JlSJl iwll a-X* i IjJUu JuJl (stc) »1* J i y*+^nJ\ jlfilj . . . 

B 

Ff. ya-8b : A discourse by Jacob, bishop of Serug, on the angel who guarded the Paradise 
of Eden, and on the believing malefactor. Same discourse, but not the same translation, as in 
MS. No. 44 K, of Catalogue, vol. ii., p. 60. 

The discourse is read at the 9th hour of Good Friday. 



52 MINGANA COLLECTION 

V-A t>*' t£^' cJ«^'j i/J^/M U"J^ JyJl Jc ^j^- <Ljui ^jm^I wrfjio Jillll ^J^t yVl All* _^ 

Begins : ^1 $\ ^1 I ^U -it 

Incomplete at the end. No date. Written in a clear, handsome and bold Naskhi hand of 
about a.d. 1400. Headings in red. Well rubricated. 

On fol. 66 is a long note, written by a later hand, in which we are informed that the MS. 
belonged to the Church of Our Lady, in a locality the name of which cannot be read with safety. 
The writer of the note is Michael George 'Azar : 

J,> ajIT. . . (?) l y U\ (?) ^U 3LJ& jj\\ f l JyJI ^jjjl ^J! u* j c IjJl^ Up-j \x r \&i 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 258.] 

248 

170 x 130 mm. 2 leaves. 

The leaves contain the index to a MS. of Mount Sinai. 

The MS. contained discourses and lives of saints, to the number of 24. 

Among the subjects discussed are : 

The life of St. Anatolius. 

The story of the priest who bought a Roman slave. 

The story of the monk from whom a poor man asked alms. 

A discourse by the Abbot Daniel. 

The history of the apostle Philip. 

A discourse on the translation of the body of the Patriarch Joseph, son of Jacob. 

Jacob of Serug, on Abraham. 

Discourses on the same subject. 

The history of the town of Horns. 

A discourse by St. Ephrem, on the miracles of Palladius. 

The story of the bishop of Edessa with a Jew and the caliph Harun ar-Rashid. 

The life of Philotheus the martyr. 

A discourse by St. Athanasius, on Melchizedek. 

The martyrdom of St. Mark the evangelist. 

A discourse by Jacob of Serug, on the death of Moses. 

The story of Theodore, a merchant from Constantinople. 

A discourse by St. Ephrem, on death. 

The martyrdom of 'Abd al-Masih, of Mount Sinai. 

A discourse by Abbot Isaiah. 

The story of a Jew called Joseph. 

On fol. 2& is an inscription to the effect that the MS. is the property of the monks of the 
monastery of Mount Sinai, for whom it is read in the church, and that anyone who removes it 
from the monastery will be under the malediction of " the Eternal Word." 

No date. A Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1400. Headings in red. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 172.] 



ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 53 

249 

212 x 133 mm. 4 leaves. Fourteen or fifteen lines to the page. 

The end of the history of a holy woman, whose life was written by her teacher Apollonius (?) 
(t/jiU-i), and whose body was taken on a Friday to " the highest place in paradise " by the 
archangel Gabriel. She was twelve years old when delivered to the emperor Numerian, and she 
ended her martyrdom under Sapor II. She was afterwards seen alive in the towns of Raqqah, 
Constantinople and Nisibin. 

Incomplete at the beginning. 

The final words are : f l ^jU cdlj fetau £-UI ^\ Jl/VI V 3UVI ^ U~ lil J-£ Ob 

.jul ,&s$U J Uk» a! J-9-Ij «*y y^i yj <>l ^— ill ji.L- J*Jj -t>' l/O^-Ij ->yl 

No date. A bold Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1400. Rubricated. 

On fol. 40 is an inscription of about a.d. 1450, by a Christian called Nasr-Allah b. Sayid 
al-'Abdi. 

I altered the order of some leaves, which had been misplaced by the binder. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 196.] 

250 

179 x 120 mm. 

A leaf culled from a MS. containing the end of the martyrdom of Jacob Intercisus. 

The first extant words are : y>-j . . . ^osll jlu»- \yj* ^ ***■ ?# j»-VI j>_j^ j^ <y ^y m 

No date. A clear and bold Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1400. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 245.] 

251 

199 x 133 mm. 6 leaves. Generally from fourteen to sixteen lines to the page. 
A discourse on the birth of St. John the Baptist, by John Chrysostom. 
Incomplete at the end. 

.JuJl (Sic) *t\ f)jl .jlJu-Jl U^; »Ulj Jm.UI JamJ\ jiy J O lS: *^\ U^; JW-Jjtfl J lL # V _,.♦-* 

On fol. 16 is an inscription by John, bishop of the monastery of Mount Sinai, to the effect 
that the MS. is a waqf to that monastery. 

No date. A clear and slightly bold Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1450. 

On fol. ia is an inscription by a later hand, in which the reader is asked to pray for a man 
and his parents, and for all baptised Christians. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 174.] 



54 MINGANA COLLECTION 

252 

211 x 135 mm. 3 leaves. Thirteen lines to the page. 

The leaves were culled from a MS. dealing with the Fathers of the Desert. They deal with 
the Fathers Arsisius and Theodore, disciples of Pachomius. 
Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. 

The first extant words are : •y^jj »3j& ly» **) jV \j~^ ^-J \f-J °jf 'OS* 
No date. A clear and bold Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1450. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 248.] 

253 

262 x 175 mm. 1 leaf. Eighteen lines to the page. 

The leaf was culled from a MS. containing the life of St. John with his disciple Moses. 

Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. 

The first extant words are : ol«Ul *le &J y» Jb) .&jJ\ »\^\ l-i* -^ ***W i >^ 51 

No date. Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1500. Rubricated. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 212.] 

254 

203 x 142 mm. 10 leaves. Fourteen lines to the page. 

A hagiographical MS. containing lives of saints, especially of martyrs. 

Incomplete both at the beginning and at the end. 

A 

Ff. 1-86 : The life and martyrdom of St. Mammas (UU), who suffered martyrdom at Caesarea 
in Cappadocia, in the time of the Emperor Aurelian. 
Incomplete at the beginning. 
The first extant words are : J±* ^-Jl Jft\ oJ «iO I4,! V JI o»b J& 

B 

Ff . ga-iob : The life and martyrdom of St. Curius or Cyrus. 

.j-ylo^c -u-1 L*af liLil w2l1 jUjYl j j£". . . o"y.->? iS^ j^' ^--Jl -A*f-« »->W^ >-*"3 • • • v^" (***". 

Incomplete at the end. 

No date. A Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1550. Headings in red. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 240.] 

255 

210 x 153 mm. 1 leaf. Fourteen lines to the page. 

The leaf was culled from a MS. containing the exploits of the archangel Gabriel. 
The first extant words are : Si ^%J\ ^JiC* yfi ^yj\ 

No date. Egyptian Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1550. Numbered in Coptic numerals as 41. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 268.] 



ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 55 

256 

218 x 167 mm. 8 leaves. Twelve lines to the page. 

A collection of 7 miracles performed by the Virgin Mary ; probably from the book entitled 

The MS. must have contained many other miracles, but it is incomplete both at the beginning 
and at the end. 

The first story deals with a bishop who instituted the feast of the Annunciation (ft. 1-20). 

The second with a wicked deacon who changed his ways through the intervention of the 
Virgin (ff. 20-36). (See Mingana Syr. 133, ff. 1086-1090, and Mingana Syr. 458, ff. 1036-1040.) 

The third with a highwayman (ff. 36-46) . (See Mingana Syr. 133, fol. in, and Mingana 
Syr. 458, ff. 1040-1050.) 

The fourth with a powerful monarch in the city of Rome, and what happened to him with 
Sibyl (ff. 46-60). (See Mingana Syr. 133, ff. 1160-1176, and Mingana Syr. 458, fol. 105.) 

The fifth with another wicked deacon in the town of " Jariras " (ff. 60-70). (See Mingana 
Syr. 458, ff. 1056-1060.) 

The sixth with a horseman (ff. 76-86). (See Mingana Syr. 133, ff. 1116-1126, and Mingana 

Syr. 458, ff. 1066-1070.) 

The seventh with a sinner (fol. 86). 

In the heading of the last story the Virgin is called " the peacock of the angels." 

.jvju^il .U 3 &>Jl j>»W> pjSy jyll f l cjJuil UlJ i.UI Ij^VI 

No date. Written in a clear and bold Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1650. Headings in red. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 263.] 

257 

215 x 160 mm. 1 leaf. Sixteen lines to the page. 

The leaf contains a part of the life of St. Faustus (^J*-.). 

The first extant words are : $\ iJM- <J1 ci^l J>j*5 <& ^js »'yj el J p '•** 

No date. Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1650. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 266.] 

258 

222 x 165 mm. 9 leaves. Fourteen, fifteen or sixteen lines to the page, according to the 
hand used. 
■ The history of St. Bakter (Victor). 

. Jail -j-liJl o j*~> 

Incomplete at the beginning. Something is missing also between ff. 5 and 6, and 7 and 8. 
The first extant words are : jVjj. tfj>\&** <^ ^y} ■*? i&b J^3 J^3 -^ 
Ends : ^y:l\ #ju, tfJJI £~-JI £>-» li-aUcj Mlj U.j ysJi ^ &J) <+*k 



56 MINGANA COLLECTION 

Dated (fol. ga) 1465 J of the Martyrs (a.d. 1749) : 

Ff. 6-7 seem to be from another and older MS., and so also is the case with ff. 8-9. 
Well rubricated. Folios numbered in Coptic numerals, as follows : Ff. 1-5 numbered as 
14-18 ; ff. 6-7 as 70-71 ; ff. 8-9 as 138-139. One of the upper corners of fol. 9 is torn away. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 265.] 

XI 
MISCELLANEA 

259 

257 x 184 mm. 2 leaves. From twenty-one to twenty-three lines to the page. Vellum. 

A 

Fol. la : The end of a discourse on the vanity of this world, on the preparation for the next 
world, and on the words uttered by a dying man to the persons round his sick-bed. 

B 

Fol. ib : The beginning of the astrological work attributed to the prophet Daniel, and 
generally known under the title of Jlita <^Ju . It is here called Book of Thunder, ocjl JcZ' . 

The work differs from that found in many other MSS. of my collection, such as Mingana 
Arab. (Isl.) 323, and Mingana Syriac 191 and 311. The text of the present MS. is much shorter, 
and its phraseology is totally different. 

Headed: \H* ^1 JUb yL> Jt <UI j^ xu £*~\) Ac\ 4^ -^J 1 J W-N *» <^»& y« !•*» 

.411 jyo iJLJI J^-lij ii^l (ijU ,3-*- 

The months are those of the Syrian calendar, and a later but early hand has written near the 
month of October, J/yi yju , the words Ul^JI y*) (sic) j£\ , and near the month of November, 

y-Vl frjS , the word (sic) yly . 

C 

Fol. za : The end of a parenetical and mystical discourse. The final words are : 

1 Written also in Coptic numerals. 



ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 57 

D 

Fol. 2a : The beginning of the discourse of St. Basil of Caesarea, on penitence. 

No date. Written in an early Christian Naskhi hand bordering on Kufi, of about a.d. 1050- 
1100. Headings in thick black characters. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 135.] 

260 

228 x 163 mm. 36 leaves. Generally thirteen or fourteen lines to the page. 

A 

Ff . ia-i8b : A discourse by Jacob, bishop of Serug, on Abraham willing to offer his son Isaac 
in sacrifice. 

The discourse is to be read on the morning of Maundy Thursday, or the Thursday of the 
Passover. 

ZyJ £..aD ».x!.> Jpe-I ILV J^*-t ff*L*' V^' kjki" ^ rij** v^ii-l u»j*n Ji»Ul ^Vl aIU ^*-« . . . 

Begins : Jb^ ^^ 4II ^,1 I UiJI iJj.JjJ 

B 

Ff . 190-286 : The work attributed to Cyriacus, bishop of Bahnasa, on the Passion of our Lord 
and on the lament of His mother. 

The discourse is to be read at the 6th hour of Good Friday. 

m.j**j* »/«Ji (£jj*\\ ujsui- <a\jt 1 Li^ji iiju ^ii-i o*yky ^*j' j-i-UJi i_/yi <uij ^^* . . . 

In the second volume of my Woodbrooke Studies, pp. 176-240, I edited and translated this 
document from two other MSS. of my collection, under the title of The Lament of the Virgin. 
Begins : <$U-I I *jj| ^ j* I VI ^j *»j*» 
The text is incomplete at the end, and something is also missing between ff . 26 and 27. 

C 

Ff. 290-366 : The salutation of the four archangels, Michael, Gabriel, Raphael and Suriel. 

Title as on fol. 34a : &bk <u»jVI /•%- 

Ff. 290-310 : Salutation of Michael. 

Ff . 320-330 : Salutation of Gabriel. 

Fol. 34 : Salutation of Raphael. 

Ff. 35&-36& : Salutation of Suriel. 



5« .MINGANA COLLECTION 

The beginning of the salutation of Michael is missing. 

Three crude pictures of angels, in colour, occupying the whole page, are found on ff. 31&, 
336 and 35a. Presumably these represent Michael, Gabriel and Raphael respectively. 
The colophon to the above salutations is (fol. 36ft) : 

.IjUll jvJ ojl <y f )L &>. 4-jVI r %- Jij *? 

No date. Written in a clear and bold Egyptian Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1750. Headings 
in red. Well rubricated. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 261.] 

261 

187 x 122 mm. 

A leaf possibly belonging to a large MS., and containing the end of a series of riddles in the 
form of question and answer. 

The first question is : " Tell me about something which breathes, and has no life ? " 

(? a! £>j V.} tJ Jii jp Jj?~\) 
No date. Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1350. No rubrications. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 167.] 

262 

215 x 148 mm. 

The last leaf culled from a MS., and containing a note of reading by a Greek monk of the 
fourteenth century. 

Curiously enough, the note is dated in a.d., and not in the year of the Greeks. The date 
given is Tuesday, 28th of July, a.d. 1388, 1 which the writer calls " of the Divine Incarnation " 
(flJ>Vlj *f>*J\ <J tfJdl ^Vl Ju**dJ). This is said to correspond with the year 6888 of the Creation. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 203.] 

263 

270 x 180 mm. 

The last leaf culled from an unspecified MS. and containing an inscription of a waqf of that 
MS. to a man whose name cannot be read with safety. 

The saints mentioned in the inscription are St. George and the Patriarch Moses. The latter 
name suggests that the MS. from which the leaf was culled belonged to the monastery of Mount 
Sinai. 

No date. A cramped Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1400. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 239.] 

264 

178 x 118 mm. 1 leaf. 

A note of reading of a MS., probably from Mount Sinai. The reader is Halal, son of the 
priest Cyriacus Bassal, who writes a date in the eras of the Creation and of the Hijrah, which do 
not seem to correspond. 

The writing is a Naskhi of the beginning of the fifteenth Christian century. 
[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 159.] 

1 Of the years which end with the unit 8, between 1348 and 1498, it is only in 1388 that the 14th of July falls on a Tuesday. 



ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 59 

265 

261 x 168 mm. 

A fly-leaf culled from a MS. of the monastery of Mount Sinai. 

It contains a note of reading by 'Ativan, son of Joseph Suwaili, who asks forgiveness of his 
sins from the Virgin, St. Moses, and St. Catherine. 

It is dated Friday, the Feast of the Transfiguration, 6th of August, 6960 of the Creation, 
13th of Mesori, 1162 of the Martyrs (a.d. 1446), and 2nd of Jumada I, 849 of the Hijrah (A.I). 1445- 
1446). All the dates are written in Coptic numerals. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 182.] 

266 

256 x 167 mm. 

A leaf culled from a MS. in the monastery of Mount Sinai. 

On the obverse is an inscription in which mention is made in a prayer of the monks of the 
monastery of Mount Sinai. 

On the reverse is a long note of reading dated in both Christian and Muslim eras as 
18th August, 6954 of the Creation, corresponding with 15th Mesori, 1162 of the Martyrs, and 
with 14th Jumada I, 849 of the Hijrah (a.d. 1446). All the dates are written in Coptic numerals. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 208.] 

267 

210 x 132 mm. 

A fly-leaf from a MS. of the monastery of Mount Sinai. 
It contains five inscriptions, by an owner and four readers. 

(A) Note of ownership : This is the oldest of the inscriptions, and contains a record, in Arabic 
and in Greek, of the bequest of the MS. to Mount Sinai : 

.IL- (sic) jy jA J\*j jum v l£)l {sic) .J* jjUm 

(B) Notes of reading : The first inscription is by the bishop of the towns of #ama and 
Ma'arrah (^Jl *y,j .1*. &, ^f fl5 U-), dated 22nd of May, 7004 * of the Creation (a.d. 1496). 
The name of the bishop cannot be deciphered with certainty. 

The second inscription is dated 1023, apparently of the Hijrah (a.d. 1614), and is written by 
Haikal, son of Nimr. 

The third is by the monk Joseph, from the village of 'Amman (ol^ \J)* 
The fourth is by the monk Hanna (John) Niyabizi. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 178.] 

268 

263 x 171 mm. 7 leaves. Twenty-three and twenty-four lines to the page. 
A collection of civil laws, in the form of cases of conscience, generally dealing with slaves and 
marriage. 

Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. 

1 Written in Coptic numerals. 



6o MINGANA COLLECTION 

Ff. i-2fl contain a preliminary discourse in which the baptised are exhorted to keep the 
divine commandments. The first extant sentence of this discourse is : 

.4*0. >lj 4.Ulj *LUj *U.tf kH. o^ *l ^^ ^1 - 5 ^ & 
The first civil law begins on fol. 2a : 

No date. Written in a rather uncommon Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1400. No rubrications. 

Leaves numbered in Coptic numerals as 266-276. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 216.] 

269 

207 x 144 mm. 8 leaves. Generally twelve or thirteen lines to the page. 

A treatise containing the Laws of Inheritance of the Byzantine emperors. Translated 
from Greek into Arabic by Cosmas, Greek Orthodox Archbishop of Cairo and surrounding dis- 
tricts. 

Begins : & J~i ^ai ^ citf" jlj &JI <>• W 5 ^ 1 ^-^ f &-l 

Ends : UJI ^jJI f UI ^ <U» ju* ci-T. . . U}\ jj-b Xj y WU ^ ^ ^" u ^ 

No date. A cramped Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1500. No rubrications. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 181.] 

270 

268 x 171 mm. , 

A leaf culled from a MS. of the monastery of Mount Sinai * and containing : 

(a) An inscription by the monk who bound the MS., and who was called Justus (cf^y), 

from the village of Kasba (Li) near Tripoli. 

(6) A note by him in which he asks the reader of the book to forgive any error he might 

find in it. 

No date. A Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1550. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 213.] 

271 

195 x 128 mm. 

A leaf containing, in dbjad numbering, a chronological table for Easter and the Jewish Pass- 
over. 

No date. About a.d. 1550. Profusely rubricated. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 173.] 

1 The writer is asking for the prayer of the Patriarch Moses and of St. Catherine. 



ADDITIONAL CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 61 

272 

211 x 153 mm. 7 leaves of two columns. Fifteen lines to the column. 

A grammatical work on the Greek language, in both Greek and Arabic. The column to the 
left in Greek, and the column to the right in Arabic. 

Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. 

No date. The Arabic is written in a Naskhi hand of about a.d. 1650. 

At the bottom of fol. \a is the name of Simawun (j.jL~-. ). Rubricated. The lower left- 
hand margins have disappeared in the first five leaves. 

[Mingana Chr. Arab. Add. 251.] 



ADDITIONAL SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 

ADDITIONAL SYRIAC MSS. CONTINUED FROM VOL. II 

Mingana Syriac 623 

310 x 212 mm. 145 leaves -of two columns. Twenty-five lines to the column 
A lectionary from the Old Testament and from the Book of Revelation, for the whole vear 
according to the Maronite Church. In Garshuni. ' 

The numbers of the lessons are placed on the margins of every lesson, and an index of them 
is found on ff. ib-2a. 

The lessons follow the calendar of the Maronite Church. 

(1) Fol. 26 : Sanctification of the Church ( ^ . a&> uxl+^1). 

(2) Fol. 36 : Renovation of the Church fry - ^ »-f%l). 

(3) Fol. 4 b : All Saints. ' ^ 

(4) Fol. 56 : The Angels. 

(5) Fol. 6b : Annunciation of Zacharias. 

(6) Fol. 7&: Presentation of the Virgin (^juo^ ~S*> (jp^ ^odj). 

(7) Fol. 86 : Annunciation of the Virgin (Jfj^ «;Jaj>). 

(8) Fol. 10a : Jacob Intercisus. 

(9) Fol. 11a : Visitation of the Virgin. 

(10) Fol. 12a : St. Barbara. 

(11) Fol. 13a : St. Nicholas. 

(12) Fol. 14& : Birth of St. John the Baptist. 

(13) Fol. 156 : Conception of Mary foupcia ouu, ^ ^ -, ) 

(14) Fol. xya : Appearance of the angel to Joseph. 

(15) Fol. 18b : Daniel the Prophet. 

(16) Fol. igb : Sunday before the Nativity. 

(17) Fol. 21a : Nativity of our Lord. 

(18) Fol. 22b : In praise of the Mother of God (<*SSs «^o -- t M\) 

(19) Fol. 23b : St. Stephen. ' l 

(20) Fol. 24b : Holy Innocents (M^M ^Jfc^>). 

(21) Fol. 256 : First Sunday after the Nativity. 

63 



64 



MINGANA COLLECTION 



(22) Fol. 26b 

(23) Fol. 27& 

(24) Fol. 286 

(25) Fol. 29a 

(26) Fol. 30& 

(27) Fol. 31a 

(28) Fol. 32b 

(29) Fol. 33& 

(30) Fol. 34& 

(31) Fol. 35^ 

(32) Fol. 366 

(33) Fol. 376 

(34) Fol. 39« 

(35) Fol. 40a 

(36) Fol. 41a 

(37) Fol. 42a 

(38) Fol. 43a 

(39) Fol. 44a 

(40) Fol. 45a 

(41) Fol. 46a 

(42) Fol. 466 

(43) Fol. 476 

(44) Fol. 48ft 

(45) Fol. 49& 

(46) Fol. 50& 

(47) Fol. 516 

(48) Fol. 526 

(49) Fol. 53a 

(50) Fol. 54a 

(51) Fol. 55& 

(52) Fol. 566 

(53) Fol. 57a 

(54) Fol. 586 

(55) Fol. 59^ 

(56) Fol. 606 

(57) Fol. 6i« 

(58) Fol. 626 

(59) Fol. 63a 

(60) Fol. 64a 

(61) Fol. 65a 

(62) Fol. 66a 



Circumcision of our Lord (J-ls; ou/Kd). 

Epiphany (uo»J4^k). 

In praise of John the Baptist. 

First Sunday after Epiphany. 

St. Antony. 

Second Sunday after Epiphany. 

Third Sunday. 

Fourth Sunday. 

Entry of our Lord into the Temple (^juojS^ ;.A ^osj) 

St. Maron (sojj^o **;J^o). 

Sunday of the priests (ogoiatSiv *-*/) • 

Sunday of the pious and just (> » n .» vSso ;/^ji/ t— J). 

Sunday of the dead (wIo^ol^v +~\) . 

First Sunday in Lent. 
First Monday in Lent. 
First Tuesday in Lent. 
First Wednesday in Lent. 
First Thursday in Lent. 
First Friday in Lent. 
First Saturday in Lent. 
The Forty Martyrs. 
Second Sunday in Lent. 
Second Monday. 
Second Tuesday. 
Second Wednesday. 
Second Thursday. 
Second Friday. 
Second Saturday. 
Third Sunday. 
Third Monday. 
Third Tuesday. 
Third Wednesday. 
Third Thursday. 
Third Friday. 
Third Saturday. 
Fourth Sunday. 
Fourth Monday. 
Fourth Tuesday. 
Fourth Wednesday. 
Fourth Thursday. 
Fourth Friday. 



ADDITIONAL SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 65 

(63) Fol. 67a : Fourth Saturday. 

(64) Fol. 68a : Fifth Sunday. 

(65) Fol. 696 : Fifth Monday. 

(66) Fol. yoa : Fifth Tuesday. 

(67) Fol. jia : Fifth Wednesday. 

(68) Fol. 72a : Fifth Thursday. 

(69) Fol. 73a : Fifth Friday. 

(70) Fol. 73& : Fifth Saturday. 

(71) Fol. 74& : Sixth Sunday. 

(72) Fol. 756 : Sixth Monday. 

(73) Fol. 76b : Sixth Tuesday. 

(74) Fol. 77a : Sixth Wednesday. 

(75) Fol. 78a : Sixth Thursday. 

(76) Fol. yga : Sixth Friday. 

(77) Fol. 79& : Saturday of Lazarus (;JjJ^> h^xto). 

(78) Fol. 80b : Palm Sunday (^j).nVSs »—/). 

(79) Fol. 81a : Morning of the Monday of Passion Week (^ojiJJ/ ^U —J-*j)- 

(80) Fol. 82a : Third hour of Monday (;>ojlJJJ ^1/ ^*> «AC^KSs J^W^)- 

(81) Fol. 836 : Morning of the Tuesday of Passion Week. 

(82) Fol. 84a : Third hour of Tuesday. 

(83) Fol. 850 : Morning of the Wednesday of Passion Week. 

(84) Fol. 86a : Third hour of Wednesday. . 

(85) Fol. 8 7 a : Morning of the Thursday of the Institution of the Eucharist (Maundy 

Thursday) (;/^»JJ/ . m .vt 1 ) w-J-aj). 

(86) Fol. 88a : Third hour. .. 

(87) Fol. 886 : Morning of the Friday of the Crucifixion (UAp oixaa^^My). 

(88) Fol. 896 : Third hour. 

(89) Fol. 90a : Sixth hour. 

(90) Fol. gia : Ninth hour. 

(91) Fol. 92a : Adoration of the Cross (**#^p» <*r^°)* 

(92) Fol. 926 : Morning of the Saturday before the Resurrection (^o~£^ K^a^ «4*j). 

(93) Fol. 93a : Third hour. 

(94) Fol. 94a : The Resurrection (<» *> )■» n i^v *-*/)• 

(95) Fol. 95a: Monday of the Evangehsts (^*-.;Ja-^ ^W)- 

(96) Fol. 96a : Tuesday of the Evangelists. 

(97) Fol. 966 : St. George. 

(98) Fol. 97a : New Sunday (t~»t-^^ ?-*/)• 

(99) Fol. 98a : Second Sunday after the Resurrection (<**>J-^ p^ ^j/K^ t-/). 

(100) Fol. 986 : Third Sunday. 

(101) Fol. ggb : Fourth Sunday. 
5 



66 MINGANA COLLECTION 

(102) Fol. 100a : Fifth Sunday. 

(103) Fol. 1006 : St. 'Abda (|«-a& ^;J.io). 

(104) Fol. 101& : The Ascension (;a\3s. j-*^)« 

(105) Fol. 102& : Sunday after the Ascension. 

(106) Fol. 103& : Our Lady of the Harvest (^^.aSs *-»t-^l y»-»po j-o.) 

(107) Fol. 104a : Pentecost (oijO^Ss *-*/). 

(108) Fol. 105* : Monday after Pentecost. 

(109) Fol. io6« : Sunday after Pentecost, 
(no) Fol. 1070 : Corpus Christi (»m^s ++*>)• 

(in) Fol. 1076 : Second Sunday after Pentecost. 

(112) Fol. 108& : Third Sunday. 

(113) Fol. 1096 : Fourth Sunday. 

(114) Fol. 110& : Fifth Sunday. 

(115) Fol. 111& : Sixth Sunday. 

(116) Fol. 112& : Seventh Sunday. 

(117) Fol. 114a : Eighth Sunday. 

(118) Fol. 115a : Ninth Sunday. 

(119) Fol. 116a : Tenth Sunday. 

(120) Fol. 117& : Eleventh Sunday. 

(121) Fol. ii8a : Twelfth Sunday. 

(122) Fol. 1206 : Thirteenth Sunday. 

(123) Fol. 121b : Fourteenth Sunday. 

(124) Fol. 122& : Fifteenth Sunday. 

(125) Fol. 123& : SS. Peter and Paul. 

(126) Fol. 1246 : All the Apostles (o&U> N! fc-flDjSs). 

(127) Fol. 1255 : St. Thomas the Apostle f^<u»jSs J^ooi ~;J.io). 

(128) Fol. 1266 : St. Elijah the Prophet (w^JSs u»t-Ss ~;J*>). 

(129) Fol. 128a : St. Shamuni (ot*-o^s mjq^cu). 

(130) Fol. 129a: The Transfiguration (w^^Ss j^). 

(131) Fol. 130a : St. Dimet (Domitius) (^oo.; -;J*>). 

(132) Fol. 1306 : The Assumption of the Virgin ((jj^Ss M*M). 

(133) Fol. 131& : Decollation of John the Baptist. * 

(134) Fol. 1326 : Birth of the Virgin ();pSs ? JJjJ ^). 

(135) Fol. 1330 : Festival of the Cross (■ a -\,> ^). 

(136) Fol. 1336 : First Sunday after the Cross. 

(137) Fol. 135a : Second Sunday. 

(138) Fol. 136a : Third Sunday. 

(139) Fol. 1376 : Fourth Sunday. 



ADDITIONAL SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 67 

(140) Fol. 139a : Fifth Sunday. 

(141) Fol. 140a : Sixth Sunday. 

(142) Fol. 141a : The Rosary (oi-.}ia$s t-^)» 

(143) Fol. 142a : Any one Apostle (J^o ^.a^op^). 

(144) Fol. 143a : Any one Saint. 

(145) Fol. 144a : Any one Martyr. 

Dated (fol. 145a) 26th of February, a.d. 1738, and written by the priest Samuel, of the 
Maronite monastery of St. Isaiah, at the time of the Abbot Martin al-Hajj (sic) 1 Peter : 

wjj^O ^^a^O ^O ^^Q^ejj OSQ.JO . . . ^£o\.SSs t-Q— / t-* ^^ sCCi^O ....,. \\ / (sic) ^X£D yi\jix& s 

>-^]-mS^ > eon 1 »lpo , mn^s ^oJ^S^ ^JJ| cUo)-*» \J±*) *** ^ "■■^-■"^■M ogj/a*k\ U±±l 

Clear West Syrian hand. Main headings in thick black characters, and sub-headings in 
red. Profusely rubricated. Broad margins. Arabic scribblings by owners on ff. ia and 145&. 

Mingana Syriac 624 

205 x 154 mm. 152 leaves of two columns. Thirty-six lines to the column. 
The Book of the Prophets, and other Books of the Old Testament. In Garshuni. 
I. Ff. ia-26b : Isaiah. 

Dated (fol. 266) in Syriac, 9th of February, a.d. 1637. 

.J— ^ -J^Jl^> ^ )&.■»«**> j^W *^*^ • • • U±*l Ol^^ ^«0 pi- 
ll. Ff. 2ja-66b : Jeremiah, with Lamentations. 

.;/ow»Ss ^ ^/ youd obo^U ■ « xCSs )-ooj/ «ojj ;«"•' <*S^» yo^ ^jKaj 

The translation, as seen in this quotation, is attributed to Pinon b. Ayyub (Job) Sahhar, of 
whom I know nothing. 

III. Ff . 6ya-6gb : The Book of Baruch, son of Neriah. In the MS. the name Neriah is written 

as Beriah (sic). 2 

.(sic) J-.;)o ^>J 70^ ota^j 

It is stated in a Syriac colophon at the end (fol. jib) that the Book was translated from 
Latin into Arabic by the lector Joseph, son of John 'Adinaya fAdini). 
• Dated 3rd of October, a.d. 1637. 



1 This word is generally applied to the Muslim pilgrims. A Christian pilgrim is called " Maqdasi." 

2 This erroneous spelling must have emanated from a MS. written in Arabic characters, as it is only in Arabic that the 
letters B and N are graphically similar, and distinguished only by an extraneous dot. 



68 MINGANA COLLECTION 

ycL*^ |^.£~ sAtf>a- ^bo JjuIJI Aoo)s (.-**>ooi; )->aS. <_*> KxulsIJj ^o^j Jla^aj fcoab^ 

,^&*a- JJ&JL» JL-ao,* >~t- ^k-a v>*^ f^°l JUva ' J-^-T^ ^~ a - ^ *"°** J 1 ** 1 * 2 * 

IV. Ff. 696-716 : The Epistle of Jeremy. 

The Epistle has no special heading, and is counted as the sixth chapter of the Book of 

Baruch : 

jS*> ^O x --^v^ .^S |^o;) ^»*/ -*3k O^WpN ~** U»|)jft^ \^ 

^^JJ .o£Ss ^0 opSs ;/j wfSs poJIJ -** ^oit-^au J.*x^ ^a)^ ~.s ^.^^.^ 

o£^ ^M yoK^fcl wKSs W^o^s 
Ends : iJ^o ooiSSs ^o Jj-^a voa- ogjl )oUjl o& ua-A ^fSs ^^j^, "^^V^ 001 ^f— 

The colophon found under the above III, to the effect that the work was translated from 
Latin, seems to apply also to the Epistle of Jeremy. 

The Book of Baruch itself ends on fol. 696 as follows : 

•on* ^jSs ^Sso opcu,£4o ot^^N ~ps ;ai^o ^42^-* ^~/^»J T ~*+ oSs^s V JJ 

The text exhibited in this MS., for both the Book of Baruch and the Epistle of Jeremy, shows 
considerable variants when compared with the text edited and translated in R. H. Charles, 
The Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha of the Old Testament, I, 569-611. 

V. Ff. jib-ioia : Ezekiel. 

,y^.y^ _jo^ ^J ^jjjSs ^J^oj-* oioaJ obo^jl ^mn oi^» ouaxj>aji w*;k^J 

VI. Ff. ioia-1126 : Daniel. 

•^CL^O^CCSS . »M^S ^W? <*0-3J OpCL^l y> m\^ o£s3s yOX^ wjK^J 

The text is followed by the story of Bel and the Dragon, which is incomplete at the end. 

The number of chapters is given in what is called " Coptic numbering," and in the ordinary 
numbering. The Coptic numbering is always one chapter ahead of the ordinary numbering. 
The reason for this will be explained below under VII. So on fol. 103a is the following heading : 

VII. Ff. ioia-1026 : The Book of Susanna. 

The Book has no special heading. It is counted in the MS. as the second chapter of the 
Book of Daniel, and is headed as follows : 

Begins (fol. 101a) : .^clo/o- oiv>«>) ^a).xa ^m. ^.^./^»/ ^-^ ^*^» ^° ^^V \J" Do 

.ogjoj Jopoco/ 01/ po/ ^/l chj/o 

Ends (fol. 1026) : (o^voj >a.o/a- ^»io oujoj J^ocxK-io/ "^x / ^° oio»^oo otS^> ) o "»«> 

0^ yol+o ^a~£o» ^W? »/jo •)— -+■** Jk^ fo*-* 3 )©j^» ^)a^ ?/ >-*>oi)-^>J "^ , *^° 



ADDITIONAL SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 69 

VIII. Fol. 112a and b : Bel and the Dragon. 

The Book has no special heading. It is counted as the fourteenth chapter of the Book of 
Daniel, and is headed as follows : 1 

Incomplete at the end. The final words are : 
. . . ^)-a3 c*Xio )oj|a ,_•»/ w- ^Ss ^fl-Js wSs )o»-s ^oit-* ^^ <**>!» ~^*» )o^ia~o 

IX. Ff. u^a-i^Sa : The Minor Prophets, as follows : 

(a) Rosea (ff. 113-116). 

The subscription is : wojlSs, ^aooi J^»j-» °ot° *-»$t» \^*i J-rJ ^ ^• a ^ J • • • ^°°^ 
The first two chapters of Hosea axe missing, owing to a lacuna of three leaves between 
ff. 112-113. 

(b) Joel (ff. n6&-n8fl) : ^-ofto ^a/ -oA ^^*a^ oio^j c**l^;X 

(c) Amos (ff. n8fl-i2i&) : . » -\i^s jaict^ otaoj 

(d) Micah (ff. I2ib-i2^a) : > «m^s )n»v> ota^j 

(e) Obadiah (fol. 124) : > » -m^q |_.^a^ oiqoj 
(/) Jonah (ff. 1246-1256) : woA %Jjou oioaj 
(g) Nahum (ff. 125&-126&) : . »^>i^s ^oa-|j chq^j 
The name " Elkoshite " is translated by " Elgasius." 
(h) Habakkuk (ff. I26£-I28<z) : . »^i^s ^n>» oiooj 

(i) Zephaniah (ff. 122^-1296) : ■ » ->i^s J^jaaj ota-aj 
(j) Haggai (ff. 129&-130&) : > ojS»> ^^- oio-aJ 
(k) Zechariah (ff. I30fe-I36a) : . . ->i^s J-*pj oto^J 

(I) Malachi (ff. I36fl-i38«) : >>m^s JLaJbo oiq^j 

At the end of the Minor Prophets is the following colophon, in which we are informed that 
the MS. was finished on Friday, nth March, a.d. 1639, and written by the priest Moses : 

X. Ff. i38«-i47& : 1 Ezra. 

y-so ^oJJ/ Pu^clSs .sjqoq^o)jlS». ^>l)^ o<;p. i^JKs ^Kaj ^XJjwl oC^Ss opab ^ co <_»;K-3J 

1 On the margin is the note : ^j||^.\|^ 001 JttA o|Q~XLSs. p/ ^Ss. ).JO|/ot ^0 . " From here till the 

end of the Prophecy it (i.e. the text) is not found in Hebrew." 



70 MINGANA COLLECTION 

In comparing the text of what is called in the MS. I Ezra with the text edited and translated 
in R. H. Charles, The Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha of the Old Testament, II, 561-624, we find 
that it represents the first part of the iv Ezra of the printed text. 

Begins : ).v>mxCSs ot$p> W k-*° }*^**l ***!* "^ V* ^ l *"* ~® ^ ^ 

Ends (fol. 147a) : .^M ^« W )?ooio ~M> ;oJbk Ajjjo ~loj <tau»t )?oi ^^JL» 

XI. Ff. 1475-152 : 11 £*r«. 
.n^J^ ..^ ^0 ^oKju v | ^^> u»a*>Ji$s ^>IJs ©rip* ^l*o ^*> ~jJ*Ss *AiaBs 

In comparing the text of what is called in the MS. n Ezra with the text edited and trans- 
lated in R. H. Charles, The Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha of the Old Testament, II, 594-624, we 
find that it represents the second part of the iv Ezra of the printed text. Our MS. thus divides 
iv Ezra into two books, called 1 and 11 Ezra. The division comes at the 19th verse of 
chapter viii of the printed text (p. 594). 

Begins : Loa JJovxtfSs ^a* ~jSs owpJJJ iooijSs ^** ^^Ss o£&> M JU* ^>HJ 

Incomplete at the end. The final words are : 

M; ^? p^ ^°° •♦H >^ ^=^ ^ ***> ^a n* ^ aiiSs ^J vJ 1 vr°° 

.)<uja 00^0 vO-*;J— wj£k )ooi\JX>\^ \<moh^J ^-.f^ ^*^°' 

These correspond with chapter xiii, v. 8 (p. 617), of the printed text in Charles's edition. 
The text of the present MS. exhibits considerable variants when compared with that edited 
and translated in Charles, Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha. 

Clear and neat West Syrian Naskhi. For date see above under I, III and IX. Headings in 

red. Well rubricated. 

On the fly-leaf at the beginning is an Arabic inscription by an owner, the priest Joseph 

Bu-Faisal Sarkis (^j** &*? y ^y. &>y*\ ^ V^ '•**)• 

Mingana Syfiac 625 

151 x 99 mm. 294 leaves. Generally thirty-nine lines to the page in the first part of the 
MS., and forty-one lines in the second part. 

A 

Ff. i#-45& : A complete Christian treatise on logic. In Garshuni. 

uaju SoSs »■ ^ ^ ■ *CSs ^o»^o J[ w^i^v )-flQL.Jl/ oJ.$Ka e n n > °> oi,o o£s3s yO^-a ^.jNjxi 
NM jt^J-s ~oto .^X^s ^\ ^-q^^s "M^J yof~ yc&± owj oU*>JIa^ ©Wja ^ t-~ 

.. of>) w no >aau»o jojl 



ADDITIONAL SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 7* 

The main divisions are into maqalahs, sub-divided into fads. There are 18 maqalahs, the 
last of which (18th) begins on fol. 30, but there are two supplementary maqalahs, the first of which 
begins on fol. 43. 

The first maqalah begins (fol. la) : ^oSa/ •^"^j* <***° U-^^ — * ~^°M oW-a-*^ 

and the last begins (fol. 30a) : ^j^Bs -^M^ ^JJ?K*>J ^ V*^ <*jlx>JK$s ^\)nv>^s 

The work is anonymous, and is under the influence of the philosophical studies of the period 
in the Catholic Church in Rome. 

For description and date, see the following treatise. 

B 
Fol. 46 : Blank. 

Ff. 47^-566 : A treatise on rhetoric. In Garshuni. 

Begins : ;)^.J ^j!/ J<**>Jj3ax>Jo .^oJlaSs v m «.l )<*-* *9p~ o^/^aSs .o<v> ? nv>^s 

.wv>)flp^ *J»»-oJ ~^ op^Jo ^./afl/ ?o^> ^oJJJa .^x.l;lo 
The main headings are : 

Fol. 470 : ^JJjk.aftJlJ vt^ 0|J ' r - *- ?^M •?)-^ , W *-*• 
Fol. 49a : $aq \|ao|o ^>3Ss *-»oio .op-j j£^» *-~WjJ ^^ 
Fol. 496 : yo\so.£>l oi ^ flol 0010 *jqjlSs —Jl^j/ <-^ 
7M. .' yo\j&&l cxK^i 0010 ot> ">» Is3k ~-J4jI ^^ 
Fol. 52a : <at-A ^/ojoj-a w^s t*4* N 0010 ^ojla^ ?/?^o| *** 
Occasionally examples are taken from Syriac, as on fol. 520 : 

Dated (fol. 566), 17th of June, a.d. 1746, and written by the Maronite monk Martinus 
(Martin) Thabit from Lebanon. 
u»axJ.po ; .n°^ j^^ wn (olu») \V vjw~ »<** ~S JpJ po-3* c£^o om-/jSl^ h^ol 

Both the treatises under A and B are written by this copyist Thabit, in a neat and minute 
West Syrian hand. Headings in red. Profusely rubricated. 

C 

Ff. 570-590 : Blank. 

Ff. 596-2916 : The work on moral theology of the Jesuit P. H. Busenbaum, who died in 
a.d. 1768. 1 In Garshuni. 



1 Cheikho, Catalogue des MSS. des Auteurs Arabes Chrdtiens (Beyrouth, 1924), p. 68, states that the work was translated 
into Arabic by another Jesuit, Michel Nau. This statement, however, seems to be erroneous, because M. Nau died in 1683, 
See ibid., p. 207. 



?2 MINGANA COLLECTION 

jUa ^ _j|mAui ^Ia-JIJ h*» wj)^Ss A4» -!*• 1?«3 ^ • • • «*W ;<"« 

an^. ~x» -^ ^°<^~ -~— *> ^)« v>* >^^ ^ W °^ ^ ~^ ^ 

A good index to the work is found on ff. 59&-66«, at the end of which it is stated that the 

^ X^^CSS ^tanrSn in Damietta by the ahove Maronite «*. 
Mai TtaS'fZ Lewi The m! was thus written in the lifetime of the author, twenty- 
three years before his death. 

.^J^o; V^l —3 $V- 

As this treatise was written fourteen months before the above two treatises, it should have 

been placed by the binder before them. . HwM iiTi« 

Clear West Syrian hand, neater and more minute than the one used in A and B. Headings 

in red. Well rubricated. Red rulings. 

D 
Ff. 291&-292& : The ritual of the scapulary of the Virgin. In Garshuni. 

Incomplete at the end. Same hand as above. 

E 
Ff. 293fl-2Q4& : The liturgy, according to the Maronite church. In Syriac. 
Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. 
The first words are : v pop ^ ^-> j nv> ^0*00 )*-*> i-f— )j^- ^-" > v ^ aA - 7^ 

No date. Same hand and description as above. 

Inside the first cover is an Arabic inscription to the effect that the MS. is waqf to the school 
of 'Ain Warqa, in Lebanon. 

Mingana Syriac 626 

153 x 107 mm. 133 leaves. Generally fourteen or fifteen lines to the page. 

A work containing the ecclesiastical laws of the Maronite Church, compiled by Michael, 
bishop of Tripoli, by order of the Maronite Patriarch John, who was from the village of Safra'. 
In Garshuni. 

vJUoJ y-**S^ "Vj -TrV* 'tf Q^QftWo Oifl^OiOO 0*30^0^0 K^Jolo *~tt* ^/*° 

<*SSs <5bcoj ^ -tfuloaSs ^va/o *** I^oS s ogupo &»*oo; oM»;po ^ l ,^~jo;J.*l^ 



ADDITIONAL SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 73 

The above Michael is Michael Sa'adah b. Ant (in b. Sham'un Hasrimi, who became bishop 
of Tripoli in 1644, and died 13th of February, 1669. See the Arabic book entitled Album de la 
Confrerie Saint Maron, deuxieme partie, par Joseph Kattar Ghanem (Beyrouth, 1903). 

As to the Patriarch John, he is the one who died on the 23rd December, 1656, after a reign 
of 8 years and 1 month. See Duwaihi, Salsalat Batdrikat . . . al-Maruniyah, edition Shartuni. 
Beirut, 1898, pp. 20-21. 

The laws contained in the MS. mostly deal with inheritance and marriage. 

On fol. 46 the author states that he collected these laws from the writings of early Patriarchs 
and bishops, and from the canons of the Councils, and that he translated them from Syriac into 
Arabic. 

y m ^y^L^v J^JJ/ wsKs ^io uJoiiA ^.Ja^o ^/j^io \ > a ..^ Jj/ JoiK9l^>o |o<K^>t^o 

JM9J0Z ^00 oiS^S ^/ s^orcv. ^_*^}o oi^CSs vl-^o u^oa^o ^Jb ^o otia^K^oo o\ i n k\ \zo 

'\^e>\ .^*iwia^/ ^aa-A^o )jl^>A y&X <*SSs opcu-jo .^iOjj>JJ/ opj^iaSsvo opjj^o^v 

Dated (fol. 133ft) Tuesday, beginning of August, 1662, and written by Joseph Khuri Dahdah 
'Aquri. 

The MS. is thus contemporary with the author, and was written 7 years before his death. 
Clear West Syrian Maronite hand. Headings in red. Well rubricated. The red ink of 
some headings has begun to fade. 

Mingana Syriac 627 

222 x 158 mm. 30 leaves. Thirty-one lines to the page. Vellum. 
Parts of the Book of Acts and of the Pauline and Catholic Epistles. 

*> «>) r> ;• \oKo )l^x Jo . on .m^; j^Ao 

The contents are : 

Acts xiii. 17-xix. 29 ; xxi. n-xxviii. 6 (ff. 1-16). 

James i. 2-v. 11 (ff. 17-19). 

1 Peter i. 20-iv. 4 (ff. 20-21). 

1 John i. 2-v. 15 (ff. 21-24). 

Romans ii. 28-x. 19 (ff. 25-30). 

No date. Written in East Syrian Estrangela characters of about a.d. 900. Important 
sections separated by red and black dots. Full sets of puhhame, or Massoretic signs. A few 
words the ink of which had faded have been blackened by a later hand, or copied afresh, as on 
fol. 26a, in an East Syrian cursive or Sirta hand. 

Two separate sets of chapter-numberings are found on the margins. In the first set, as in 
Mingana Syriac 103 * and 148, 2 the numbering embraces the whole of the New Testament. In 



Catalogue of the Mingana Collection of MSS., vol. i., pp. 251-252. 2 Ibid., pp. 340-345. 



74 



MINGANA COLLECTION 



the second set, the Book of Acts and the Catholic Epistles are counted as one book, and the 
Pauline Epistles as another book, beginning with a new set of chapters. 

The MS. is very important, as it exhibits on the margins and in the body of the text the 
complete process of the East Syrian Massorah. In comparing this MS. with Mingana Syriac 
148, which also contains the East Syrian Massorah, I found some variants in the Massoretic 
system used in the two MSS., although on the whole they exhibit the same characteristics. In 
some respects the Massorah used in the present MS. is older and more reliable. 

I altered the arrangement of the leaves of this MS., which had been misplaced by the binder. 



Mingana Syriac 628 

252 x 173 mm. 1 leaf of two columns. Twenty-eight lines to the column. Thick vellum. 

A leaf culled from a MS. of the Old Testament. 

It contains the Song of Solomon, from chapter i., verse 17, to chapter iii., verse 10. 

When the text of this leaf is compared with that of the Peshitta text as published by the 
British and Foreign Bible Society in 18263 and in Mosul in 1888, it exhibits many variants. 
These variants are sometimes so important that they seem to suggest a different version. I will 
give below some examples : 



w 



Printed Text. 

(i. 16-ii. 1). )nv»a\ Knot (j^o^ji Kjl*o* 
(first). v -,u^l (ii. 7) 
(ii. 9). >J^£d/ ;k«m..3 ^oj«0 001 }o\ Jbj 

(ii. 10). 

(ii. 14). v-*dqj_** 

No date. A clear and fairly bold Estrangela hand of about a.d. 500. No rubrications of 
any kind in the text. Fairly broad margins. 



Mingana Syriac 628. 

.JJjL*; (Kjlaqji )hs \ ft 6 *; J.-^cx 

.^IVXlftl 

•Vao yo\* 001 )ot "^-/ k-*o» )}o4 > ^» JM> 



Jo— );OJl \^ ^XJL^^^J J^OA? J^£-* 



*\ 



Mingana Syriac 629 

242 x 148 mm. 2 leaves. Twenty-six and twenty-seven lines to the page. Thick vellum. 

The leaves were culled from a MS. of the Old Testament, and contain in Maccabees iv. 15- 
v. 5 and v. 31-v. 43. 

In comparing this MS. with Mingana Syriac 486 C {Catalogue, vol. i., p. 898), we find that 
both of them exhibit the same text, with only slight variations. Here is verse 43 of chapter v. : 



ADDITIONAL SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 75 



Mingana Syr. 486 (fol. 69a:) 
^^so )>oou ^J^ ^/ ^aoi ^* uflLOo/ 
o t ,* \/o )$o±oo )q>,*m.a oi_.po/o a>ci^i) 
^o^jj wuojb; 001 v oot\'Y.ot\o (touxa y^/ 



Mingana Syr. 629 (fol. 26) 
^•^^0 );ooi-. > ^. ^3/ ^oi ^.j - *«*l 
y*A oi-.j-a.iJo );qjlx> ) °> * fift^ ot-.j-ao/o ^o^aj 
ok ^oxij ^oojbj 001 yoofcjuoko JKxftfl 



No date. A clear and early Estrangela hand of about a.d. 400-450. 

The signs of the puhhame are very scarce, and are confined to the dots of the letters Dalath 
and Raish, the two dots denoting the plural form, and the full stops. 

A red heading : " The Third Book of the Maccabees," is on fol. lb. No rubrications of any 
kind in the text. Fairly broad margins. 

Mingana Syriac 630 

178 x 135 mm. 1 leaf. Twenty lines to the page. Vellum. 

The leaf was culled from a MS. of the Old Testament, and contains 1 Samuel xv. 12-20. 

The text exhibited in it is that of the Peshitta version of the Old Testament. 

No date. A clear and bold Estrangela hand of about a.d. 550. 

Long sections are marked with red dots, as follows : two red horizontal circles, separated 
by two red vertical dots and two small black horizontal dots, followed by two more red horizontal 
circles. 

Mingana Syriac 631 

244 x 146 mm. 1 leaf. Thirty-five lines to the page. Thick vellum. 
The leaf was culled from a MS. containing mystical matter. 
Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. 

The first extant words are : J-a^> ^.-(o opa^mj; Jxaj-a J.jl^ ok y^o JjupKioj ouots 
•l 3 ^^ )-~oV3 j-*oid» woiolo^J. ok ;p opjojox^ -(jpoio )^ua\ ^a,a» )V*\* 

No date. A clear Estrangela hand of about a.d. 780. A few vowels according to the East 
Syrian method. 

Mingana Syriac 632 

228 x 145 mm. 1 leaf. Vellum. 
The leaf was culled from a MS. containing the Gospels. 

The obverse contains the end of Luke (xxiv. 53), with the following colophon, where it is 
stated that St. Luke wrote it in Greek in Alexandria : 

J-igjmaE w ^a £^4jo_» ^b^oj J-oo^» Jlojop )-*•»*■£ vo-k^io/ Jjoi J-aKa^ ^Kaack \ck* 



7 6 



MINGANA COLLECTION 



No date. A bold Estrangela hand of about a.d. 500-530. Well rubricated. Fairly broad 
margins. Leaf numbered as 95. 

This is immediately followed by another colophon, in the same hand that wrote the reverse 
of the page, in which we are informed that the MS. was collated with great care with the copy of 
the priest John. The names of the copyists who collated it have been obliterated. 

.(juOlo ^ju.o-5 J—- j ^0 Jk^; (loa-j^ Jjoi )-sAo voio^a; [. . .] ~oW<x~ JoC^ 

On the reverse are two inscriptions by two different hands, the first of which, in black ink, 
may be traced back to about a.d. 600. In this first inscription, from which the proper names 
have been carefully obliterated, mention is made of a monastery and of its Abbots who wrote 
and collected many MSS. for it. In the second inscription, which is written in brownish ink, and 
dated 954 of the Greeks (a.d. 643), it is stated that the above MSS. were sold in that year, in the 
time of the Abbot Dinha. 1 Among the books sold were a Psalter, and a volume of the works of 
Mar Jacob, probably of Serug. 

The inscriptions consist of 23 lines. I will give below all the words which can be read with 
safety, and place them in the space of the line which they occupy in the MS. : 

.^o|o ^.J 13 x 

voo£o ^Aoi £fco ^-j ^oot 14 2 

>8^;/o ^JL^eu>o D^aiJil kuua 15 ~po ) » cet .. 3 

16 o^ 4 

17 ~poo )poa^j 5 



Jpoax ^>o ^-Aot £fco nOjlsjj/ 



o£sj>» J^v* )** I0 - \P°'> 7 

£to ^.j ^oot •(poQi.j oi^-j )la-i 20 0^0 aSj-J opa* ^^00; 001 8 

j^o; yc± .h^lJ^XL*** yooi^s ^01 21 woj^ ^J Ja*J ^Aoi £*o 9 

■ ~»*y- w-poj )K.» mfto 22 «oiaa*^> oi; JpoJ; JL> l*-a 10 

23 1,1*^00; vJoi )lm\v> oJ,$-.J *+-*U II 

)^C^J>>) OiK-^oVl ^0 yoA J,00( 12 

Mingana Syriac 633 

216 x 142 and 224 x 152 mm. 2 leaves of two columns. Vellum. 

The leaves were culled possibly from two different MSS. The first leaf has thirty-six lines 
to the column, and contains the beginning of the Gospel of Matthew (i. 1-20), in the Peshitta 
version. 

1 The name can only be read with difficulty. 



ADDITIONAL SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 77 

The second leaf contains Acts xiii. 26-xiv. 16, also in the Peshitta version. 

No date. An East Syrian Estrangela hand of about a.d. 900-950. 

Headings in red, and the sectional divisions in black and red. 

Fol. 2a contains on the margin, beside chapter xiii., verse 44, two chapter numberings, 91 
and 13. The first denotes the chapters from the beginning of the New Testament, and the second 
belongs exclusively to the Book of Acts. 

Even if the leaves are from two different MSS., these MSS. are more or less contemporary. 

The bottom half of the back of fol. 1 has been mended with a slip of paper, on which there 
are scribblings by an owner. 

Mingana Syriac 634 

233 x 169 mm. 2 leaves of two columns. Thirty lines to the column. Thick vellum. 

The leaves were culled from a MS. of the New Testament, and contain 11 Cor. ii. 8-iv. 18. 

No date. A clear and bold Estrangela hand of about a.d. 850-900. 

The leaves are numbered in Syriac by a later hand as 167, 168, and number 21, in Arabic 
words, is found at the top of fol. 2a. These words apparently denote the number of quires of 
eight leaves. 

The lessons are indicated on the margins by a later hand. 

Mingana Syriac 635 

3 leaves. Thick vellum. 

Fol. 1 : 235 x 152 mm. Fol. 3 : 235 x 163 mm. 

Twenty lines to the page on fol. ia, twenty-two on fol. lb, and twenty-three on fol. 3. 

The leaves were culled from a MS. of the New Testament. 

Fol. 1 contains Acts i. 6-16. 

Fol. 2 contains Acts iv. 36-v. 9. 

Fol. 3 contains 1 John ii. 4-16. 

Fol. la must have been blank, and been filled in by a later and unskilled copyist, who, not 
having accurately estimated the space required, had to repeat at the bottom of the page some of 
the words from the top of the following page. 

No date. A bold and handsome Estrangela hand of about a.d. 950. 

Fol. 2 is fragmentary, and only half of it remains. 

Fol. 3 has broad margins, and is numbered as 117. 

It is probable that fol. 1 emanates from a different MS. of more or less the same period. 

The lessons are indicated in red in the margins by a later hand. 

Mingana Syriac 636 

247 x 160 mm. 1 leaf. Vellum. 

The leaf was culled from a MS. of the New Testament. 

It contains the beginning of the Gospel of St. Matthew (Matt. i. 1-17). 

•^^A ^AOOJ )j.OJOp )~*_.jJ3 yOjX^o/ 



7 8 MINGANA COLLECTION 

No date. A clear and slightly bold Estrangela hand of about a.d. 850. Headings in red. 
At the top of the page an Arabic inscription indicates the lesson as that of the Sunday 
before the Nativity (&J\ Ji j^VI f jJ). This indication is repeated in Syriac on the margin 

of the page. 

On fol. ifl is an Arabic inscription in which we are informed that the MS. belonged to the 

monastery of Mount Sinai. 

Another inscription gives us an index, also in Arabic, of the Books of the New Testament 

found in the MS. 

Mingana Syriac 637 

229 x 180 mm. 1 leaf. Twenty-eight lines to the page. Vellum and palimpsest, of 
which the upper-writing is in Syriac and the under-writing in Palestinian Syriac. 

UPPER-WRITING 

A leaf culled from a MS. containing mystical matter. 
The first extant words are : 

Jjl*.Jo ^-N .)^>; 1+2* ^jJ? ot«M l^ul ^-o^o ^-Aok .)JU*op <*-* "M* > ^ <&} Jjoi 

The author often speaks in the first person : " I saw," " I enquired," etc. 
No date. An Estrangela hand, bordering on East Syrian Sirta, of about a.d. iioo. Well 
rubricated. 

UNDER-WRITING 

The under-writing is in Palestinian Syriac, and contains homiletic and parenetic matter on 
lives of saints. Some words found in it are not registered in F. Schulthess's Lexicon Syrofialce- 
stinum. 

No date. About a.d. 800. 

Mingana Syriac 638 

218 x 145 mm. 2 fragmentary leaves. Fol. %a : Thirty-one lines to the page. Vellum. 
The leaves were culled from a MS. containing mystical matter. 
Fol. 2a is marked in Syriac as 176. 

On fol. 26 is an inscription to the effect that a volume of the New Testament belonged to 
Rabban Kuma, from the monastery of St. George of Hator. 

.;olot; ttt*^ »°-^ ~P°? )p°°^ ^9 J-*>°3 ^»? Ht-** 

No date. A clear Estrangela hand of about a.d. 630. Headings in red. A later hand has 
repeated twice Matt. i. 1 on fol. la. 



ADDITIONAL SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 79 

Mingana Syriac 639 

240 x 162 mm. 2 leaves. Thirty and thirty-three lines to the page. 

An early version of the Acta Pilati and of the trial and crucifixion of our Lord. 

Some words are unfortunately illegible on the first page of the text. 

The Syriac text exhibited in the present MS. corresponds (but with considerable variants) 
with the Greek text edited by Tischendorf in his Evangelia Apocrypha and with the Coptic text 
edited and translated by E. Revillout in Pat. Orient, ix. 60-132, etc. A good translation (and in 
some parts analysis) of the whole story is given by M. R. James in his Apocryphal New Testament, 
pp. 94-146. 

A fragment only of the Syriac text of the second part of the story was in 1908 published by 
Rahmani, in his Studia Syriaca, ii. 1-38. 1 The first part of the text as exhibited in our MS. is 
apparently not found elsewhere. 

I will give below the text of the story as found in the MS. I will also give its translation, 
side by side with the translation of the Greek text, as found in M. R. James's The Apocryphal 
New Testament, pp. 96-97. 2 

No date. A West Syrian hand of about a.d. 1200. 

On fol. la are memoranda of a shopkeeper written on paper, apparently taken from a binding 
in order to renovate the margins of the MS. 

w*V/ ^-30 ),.-.. «. » . s o ^ojl* ypo; JJ{a&? IL^q&iaoaaLJ ^i^^to )t »>^ft> voiSsj ouNooJ, ^^ 

*$**l ) Kjjl s ota .j^iooVjo M;cl«i )lo »».;-» \ mo upq»$) n*fa oti.cn\v>9 JftaaxiJ, Aoljl^ 

.(?)).« * * * 0*90 J..*.*>oVj (*>) ^a[9a-j])^.9)j .(-XJQ-.J )l »IV>"> 040 oiajs \^\^ jjjj Jia±Ju.}9 
^.ioj 001 sA.A.Ad{ jooi J^oK^oj 001 [. . .] j.*?a«9 )Kao !•>->; ..n>o.A. e >N>n > ^S9 ^_J.Vlo ^a^sV/ h, 1 > -» 

)oO|9 J ?* (»-SoKAJj) *.JD<i:XU>On » l\ joof ^oKiij )^..».*V> ^OJl> ypOJ Qjl<r\ -> ,\jO Q(JUm 9K0 

oi^amo 0001 » *j V>V ^oi; yOCH.-x.o Jj»9a«^o (^oo_.j (Kaoxd} pop > » *>y\ K-oo/ Jj.'iol«\ yoj} ^'"Ss? 

.)■»$ ^>V If^ffl^ a»a:*u90..o_»j 001 001 
j^»a_9 jjc*oj )^t-«to wb^oojo ^jaooit-LfloaSso ^^Kajo )»ooi-»o yijo yOXaOAO |^l-j3o ^-JJ— x-*t-*oi 
)». « IV) <*.qju* ^pa\ ^oio^o^a a^v ^a^ o \ jj<x*x^.| ^ma^JL^ lo\ oi/o (t-^s/ 0001 ojlLdZ| 

^JU^f* ^OJl. |jOp*9 ^po/p jjOia^./ w4DO,^JL*£ ^Oj-O O00| ^«. K g j_00(0 ))LS ^ P jjp^OXD S \^J)0 
)oj^9 ^aS. OOf Olt-^! )lo^.^^ OMU9J ^\ $.io/o Otl y . 'lV* ^CL*p09O )t^ ^AOi} oo« oit-sj o<\ 

(jta^o ^a-fio? )mnv\i\ s.d/o ^.^ao ^&aj^> s.s/ JJ/ p^eo (901 9Q^^s a\o .001 J.s>^oo J.**. 
[. . .] fjpaao t--^^. Jjl^o vooi\ po/o (jaia^.| u»a£JL»£ (jl^o »qS^. av J \ o ) fJ v>\ j-sj ^.i'oi-ajl 

w£DO^JLbS\o Jj»?0~* OJL^O •J-fcO-bO yOltX VLtt) yOlN »9 j.nPO V> J aSw^O^\ J.^>J |~L3^/o Oi\ t-^L\ 



1 The word ja^o jao , Cursor, wrongly spelt in Rahmani's text as jOflftOjOLO , is rightly given in our MS. as jOuCDiCLO 
3 It will be noticed that the preface by iEneas is missing in our text. 



80 MINGANA COLLECTION 

(jujl ^.qa.- ^,1 Jjoi .)Kaji» J.*>a^ J^o/I^jo w*poj ^JLbo ^jlj/ JJj ^X K+l ^po J.^OQLicu ^-.po/ 
J^*oV ^io ooch ^.mjfcooj MljJJo Jj^.~\o J_Ls*f^o J..,pLba^o ) V v> ni\ ^3/ (.jKjaoaaiSo J£~^~ 

.)KjX*» j.^00..^ yQ-j) *+.Col JjlJL^ wOfO^b^O ^'Oi^JJ JLfcQ^O VLflOj )..flDO_*XJ ^^ ' f >\Q ^po| J (KjuX.^5 

^.po 001 ).**■*•? <*^ ^»P°/o J-->o-» ©-*■* .JjlX^ ^.oio^l^ ^^.j.^ vOo£>> po/o u»a^Jl^a )jl^o 
pojo wtta£JL*S j-tb. ^-»j-»oi .o&, ^L^KjLbo ^opo ^^ao Jo-»; ^o.Sl>o )<L;j (.ju.; ^Aoaj^^A -*> 
«.m-*j^a^Aflo/» s^oioh*).^ ^o&j; JJ/ )o-.j ^io > n°ii ^-foi? iooi JJ )J^&1^ ).— oV» Jjoi v°°^ 

^.ioo;j Jj.£0^O*. ^O ^l^b^> ^-*po/ p ^C0Ol^ JL . < 3 > \ J.-JO-. OOOI ^»0|0 ffl-»-2>/ y-»J-»OI .(pOODj Jo£^» 

.^./KaJ K^)ff>OV>l)0 ^-L^OlsaJiJ J_^»$CO yOfOO J.JUJ K*.^S-\ ^_O0^ ^.QiwJO Jaoi ja.o-9 

.001 J^Xio; omaj ^^ po/j yo^j/ ^*P*>/ v?k«»/ J^>°-^ P»o/o w^oa^JL^ (ooi J-i^ x^-t-oi 
ji *-A~ wfloa^ji.^a\ opo/o Jj*a- ai^o »^W )^^>; Jjaia.^./ ~JW? )J/ )j/ > ..t»v> Jja-Jo 
o&. )ooi t-^.3 V!"*°* **oifih*4 ).">\ v>» oiJuSJ ^i, po/ oot; JI/ 001 J.a^io? ^jupo/o ^jujoimio 
la^ ^_io ;o.£o;o_o v.n.aj ^*f-*°« 'It-**-*)- 3 *^o^ ^.qju* "^axj; oj^ po/o flDo»aflD$ftA^> a»a^JL*3 
^^ ^*-*°t °^ f^ ' 'k~* ^°° ,0 *-^ r^°° ^-©l -* ^ ^t-^o **><•> t ,»\ )ooi 04^joKa/o (jaia^.J 
^ot ^joi ^ax. ^po oi^ po/o J^$/ ^o. )oot OUQ0V3O ioxDjao 001 oit-J-s )ooi )p»* JLbJfafcft )oot 

.^\ )^Ld jja^o.^/ wpo; Jjuj IS, » -»\ ^a^o 
x^-po/o ^oa^JL^S ^.^ ^oiol^. ^ . i^v o-.pt ;o-flo}a^ j-a^j ^T^ )^? a - °>— f 3 K*!"* 01 
p-^ )joi -jo-i»}aD ^> JJ/ ^.oxjj ^ioj^ >^qju» ^.p)!/ Ji ^*p*J wiu/ j-^ )-tio ^£^oj 
"^.^ ^oia^o^o ^.oiasVo-s ^.^ ^s ^.owf-o wA9jj v*.^ )t.-.bo ^io-sjj Jjl^sXoh ^o ;jKa/j ;ajco;aA 
y^poj o^. po/o |^»;/ ^o» otj-j-3 )ooi ^-a^» 001 Jl > n » °> J001 ^o^S ^-y-*oio .oiS. t^»o J.\;/ 
oi^ po|o U\ Jj;o- ^ UDa^JUs ^ia* ^01 po .^X )p> )jaia^./ ^.poj .^o^o ^o; J.Djoi 
)ooi ^-*J; r A p; ux>a^JL^\ po/o ;ojo;ax> J001 J-U^ ^*h»oi .lj-a^> ^opo Jjoi 001 Jjl*> Jo-ooja^ 
sJLi^ UX^o )j1/ ^ JL^. ^\ ^Kj p J^oq, oil^>- aaojpmaSs l©^ ye^x^ yx£±cx* 
.yooviyj-a JLo?jo )K-j; (iJo^o 0001 ^j^— / p l^oopco (jLbuko/ ^-po/o 0001 ^->^o K-/p>.\ ).-^^ 
Ub^o/ ^opo^ Ui^o/ 0001 s-po/ Jjldoio JL^j ^.oia^V K~J, vOoUjJ^o 0001 ^^^ Ui~l 

•l~*P°? Q < V>i a )i/j 001 ooi >■»')■■=> ^-»o/!? otp^S. 
0001 ^oa> ipo/j ^J U^ )oi ? v po/o i<ia>i<ix> "%^ 0001 ^a> Jj;ja- 0001 a-pi vr d 
Ui. vr o, .000, ^po/ U*> Kj/ ^jJ )jxia-/ ^0 J^p^ ^J^/ Jj p, Kj/ .JL./p^ v po/o 
p> Jpx* o^; ? ^o, p ^oi Jo* pU>x \a t e+ ^koi ^0 ^ K-001 K^^j yoo^ po/o ;oj»;o* 
^-Ao! (JL^-i ^^; 001 Uio ^ja- ? oCS. ipo/o .Jip^oj J;o^ 01^ ^j 0010 ^.-p v ;i 
o,X*- w^ )ooi ^us v? 001 .^i-^o s-.oiabop> ^oijo )ia^V» );i^ V P^> p ^-po/o 
.oooi ^^po k.)^x3o ^a^^j ((jl^co Ur~lo oip> ^00 ^_,o ^^; p )>C^o ? 
1 This word is written in the lower margin and followed by the word .w>. ^\^|, (sic /)_ 



ADDITIONAL SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 



81 



)-l^jlo/ Jjito* oC^ ^-po/ .K-/^l^ oooi ^-a^o )jLa-/ J^'jo-^ po/o udo^JL^ Jooi |i^ <-*t*0| 
.^oof.3 jjfja. oC^ ^..poj .(j^ao/j J-o.aq.3 aiioo vooj^ po/o ^floa^JL*9 J.1*. .0001 ^-^a 
v aA J^.~ )jl*> ~P°W yaauXj^ ,-*>> jbo ^50. yoM ^;oi.£Q.bo ^KjJ v /o aaoo^JUs yook po/ 

.oooi ot>Kji w^oa^JU.a ^io oooi ab^iaA )>oi p ^*> v°-»oi .ja^Djao 
^■ otA ^ota-^>/ J^j/ J^l^j ).v> , i rt>/ )-L*J-ao px^ a>a3 ;axo$o-o^ po/o ^floa^JL.3 J.1^ V^ * 
Jl^n^a\ ^o^3 ^o .(.^^Ot-o ) aa - a flo) y-»/ t-a^ ^oju. jk-s ;o»;qa <-aoi Jooi ^asj po .).d;ov\ 
K+.*± ^ojl. v p° )ooi N ^.b. y.0 ^- r oi .^ )p> Jjaax^./j ^^oo ^oi. )i v po ^qaJ^ po/ 
^,*o» > i .V wiooi wJldV/ ^-»*->oio '.aaoj.x^.co oooi ^ . n ,> *>\ o Jx.*; ^ot-° Jiu/ oooi ^ .^ .^. Jx.» 

.^■<H.»\ O& wi'OOl ^V^DO UQPjJU^&dP 

^aiL«.\ oi^ ^iooi wi^»o ^oJ-l^Uo wiooi w^jldVI/ Jjl*-/o > ^i> f. y> » n <*> / |i4^» J^?<*- o>~ po 
^.«o& oooi ^jOU.XJ; ^-Aot "^ 0001 ^*&a K—Z^N^^o .yooi)^; ^o^aoo 0001 oKia-*i/ 
Jjoi (ijoiojK^ 61-^ yolpo?!/ ^*? P JbjaA po/o ^c^JL*3 Jooi U* ^t-** •' m ' V "^ 

^-uL^J ^Aoi "^ yoM ^D )ot fil .^OJl^ ~V^»° *A1^HD» ^O f . t » V t*19*A| U±*U 

y XJL^^ a yoj/ ^Ju>~ ^u. ^oa^JJL.9^ Jjfea* ^.po/ .^010*0^ "V^ © ■ m 1 ^V tn\ ^-*o& 0001 
v*j/ Jooi )fo ^-t-01 .o£> 0001 oj^coo ■ m 1 ^V ffl\ ^oi^. 0001 ^a- v fc yOJoi 0001 qidjW U*-/» 

ai^o Jjaoi yoij-a.^ U* ^>? v°°^ P°/° - m iJL V m>S > v**^ ° 001 V^ ! V?^ wtta^JUa 
v «../vt.v> Uau/o JK^aia? ^ju* ^>oi )jJi^o (aju. ^-i- )iias^ ^ju- Jjaia^A ^.po/ p vOJoi 

(Castera desunt) y ^m^N ^-ooi 



1 The gloss j.Sa.0 is written in the margin. 

New Text 

By the help of our adorable God we write 
the records of the interrogation of our Lord 
Jesus Christ by the governor Pilate in the 
twentieth year of Tiberius Caesar. 

In the nineteenth year of the kingdom of 
Tiberius Caesar, in the (combined) governor- 
ship of the Jews and of the Romans ; x in the 
nineteenth year of this governorship, on the 
twenty-fifth of the month of March according 
to the computation of the Greeks; in the 
... 2 of the Romans and of the . . . 3 and 



1 The author refers here to the fact that Jerusalem was 
governed both by the Jews, represented by Herod, and by 
the Romans, represented by Pilate. 

2 A half illegible word. 3 A half illegible word. 

6 



Old Text 

In the fifteenth (al. nineteenth) year of the 
governance of Tiberius Caesar, emperor of the 
Romans, and of Herod, king of Galilee, in the 
nineteenth year of his rule, on the eighth of 
the Kalends of April, which is the 25th of 
March, in the consulate of Rufus and Rubellio, 
in the fourth year of the two hundred and 
second Olympiad, Joseph who is Caiaphas 
being high priest of the Jews : 

These be the things which after the cross 
and passion of the Lord Nicodemus recorded x 
and delivered unto the high priest and the rest 

x For "recorded," etc., other manuscripts and Coptic 
and Latin have " recorded those things that were done by 
the high priests and the Jews." 



82 



MINGANA COLLECTION 



New Text 

in the forty-second Olympiad, 1 the head of 
the Sanhedrin of the Jews . . . , 2 who was 
called Aphiki, after the Passion and Cruci- 
fixion of our Lord Jesus Christ asked Nico- 
demus to write that which took place and 
happened to the Jews, that is to say, to the 
high priests of the Sanhedrin of the Jews and 
to all the Jews who were living there. And 
the same Nicodemus recorded it in Hebrew 
letters : 

Then Annas, Caiaphas, Simon, Dathan, 
Judas, Naphtali, Alexander, Romi, and the 
rest of the priests of the Jews gathered 
together and came to Pilate the governor, in 
order to accuse our Lord Jesus Christ before 
him of many deeds. And they shouted 
before Pilate the governor, saying : " We 
know this Jesus to be the son of Joseph the 
carpenter, and of Mary his betrothed, but he 
says about himself with falsehood that he is 
the son of the living God, and a king. He not 
only does this, but he has polluted our 
sabbaths, and wishes to abrogate and destroy 
the law which Moses established for our 
fathers." 

And Pilate the governor answered and said 
to them : " What things has he done, and 
how does he wish to destroy your law which 
Moses established for you ? " 

And the Jews answered and said to Pilate : 
" Lord, we have a law that no man amongst 
us should dare and be healed on a sabbath 
day, but this Jesus has dared to break the 
law which Moses established for our fathers, 
and by his evil deeds has healed on a sabbath 
day people who were lame, bent, blind, 
paralytic, lepers, and dumb, and people who 
were tormented by evil spirits." 

And Pilate answered and said to them : 
" By what evil deeds ? " 

1 Lit. " in the year 42nd of Olympius " (sic .'). 

2 An illegible word. 



Old Text 

of the Jews : and the same Nicodemus set 
them forth in Hebrew (letters). 



For the chief priests and scribes assembled 
in council, even Annas and Caiaphas and 
Somne (Senes) and Dothaim (Dothael, 
Dathaes, Datam) and Gamaliel, Judas, Levi 
and Nepthalim, Alexander and Jairus and the 
rest of the Jews, and came unto Pilate accus- 
ing Jesus for many deeds, saying : We know 
this man, that he is the son of Joseph the 
carpenter, begotten of Mary, and he saith 
that he is the Son of God and a king ; more- 
over, he doth pollute the sabbaths and he 
would destroy the law of our fathers. 



Pilate saith : And what things are they 
that he doeth, and would destroy the law ? 



The Jews say : We have a law that we 
should not heal any man on the sabbath : but 
this man of his evil deeds hath healed the 
lame and the bent, the withered and the blind 
and the paralytic, the dumb and them that 
were possessed, on the sabbath day ! 



Pilate saith unto them : By what evil 
deeds ? 



ADDITIONAL SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 



83 



New Text 

And the Jews answered and said to him : 
" Lord, he is a sorcerer, and he casts out 
devils by Beelzebub, the prince of the devils, 
and everything is subject to him." 

Then Pilate answered and said to them : 
" This does not mean that evil spirits are cast 
out by the devil, but that they are driven out 
by Asclepides, the god of the high priests." 

The Jews then besought Pilate and said : 
" We would wish the power of your majesty 
to order him to be brought before you in the 
judgment hall and before the throne of your 
majesty, and be legally interrogated." And 
Pilate answered and said to the Jews : " You 
say that he says about himself that he is a 
king. How then can I, who am a governor, 
examine a king ? " 

And the Jews answered and said to Pilate : 
" We do not bear witness that he is a king, 
but that he said of himself that he is a king." 

Then Pilate called the messenger (cursor) 
and said to him : " Let Jesus enter (and 
come) before me with honour." And the 
messenger left the presence of the governor, 
and perceiving Jesus, knelt before him and 
worshipped him, and after having worshipped 
him he took the kerchief that he (the messen- 
ger) was holding in his hand, and spread it on 
the ground and said to him : " Lord Jesus, 
walk hereon and enter the judgment hall, for 
my lord the governor calls you." When the 
Jews saw what the messenger did, they began 
to complain about him before Pilate, saying : 
" Why was not Jesus called before you by a 
man other than the messenger ? Immediately 
after this messenger was despatched by the 
power of your majesty, he went out and saw 
him (Jesus), and kneeling down before him 
on the ground he worshipped him. Then he 
spread the kerchief which he held in his hand 
on the ground, and said to him : ' Our Lord, 
walk hereon and enter in, for my lord the 
governor calls yo*u.' " 



Old Text 

They say unto him : He is a sorcerer, and 
by Beelzebub the prince of the devils he 
casteth out devils, and they are all subject 
unto him. 

Pilate saith unto them : This is not to cast 
out devils by an unclean spirit, but by the 
god Asclepius. 

The Jews say unto Pilate : We beseech thy 
majesty that he appear before thy judgement- 
seat and be heard. And Pilate called them 
unto him and said : Tell me, how can I that 
am a governor examine a king ? They say 
unto him : We say not that he is a king, but 
he saith it of himself. 



And Pilate called the messenger (cursor) and 
said unto him : Let Jesus be brought hither, 
but with gentleness. And the messenger 
went forth, and when he perceived Jesus he 
worshipped him and took the kerchief that 
was on his hand and spread it upon the earth 
and saith unto him : Lord, walk hereon and 
enter in, for the governor calleth thee. And 
when the Jews saw what the messenger had 
done, they cried out against Pilate saying : 
Wherefore didst thou not summon him by an 
herald to enter in, but by a messenger ? for 
the messenger when he saw him worshipped 
him and spread out his kerchief upon the 
ground and hath made him walk upon it like 
a king ! 



8 4 



MINGANA COLLECTION 



New Text 

When Pilate heard these things from the 
Jews, he answered and said to the messenger : 
" What is this that you have done ? " And 
the messenger answered and said to Pilate : 
" When your power had sent me to Alexander 
at Jerusalem, I saw him (Jesus) sitting on the 
foal of an ass, and the children of the Hebrews 
were crying and saying in Hebrew : ' Ho- 
sannah in the highest,' while they held in 
their hands branches of olive trees and palm 
trees. Some others were spreading their gar- 
ments under the feet of the foal, saying : 
' Hosannah in the highest ! Hosannah to 
the son of David ! Blessed is he that cometh 
in the name of the Lord.' " 

Then the Jews began to cry and to say to 
the messenger : " You say that the children 
were crying and saying in Hebrew, and you 
who are not Hebrew, how do you know what 
they were saying ? " And the messenger 
answered and said to them : "I asked one 
of the Jews standing there, who had a two- 
months-old infant in his arms, and who was 
also shouting this hymn, saying to him : 
' Explain to me what these children are 
crying and saying, while myriads of serried 
ranks are running before him in an excited 
way.' And he interpreted for me the full 
meaning of the sentence, while he was shaking 
and fearful on account of his son. Many 
other people were excited and were crying in a 
similar way." 

And Pilate answered and said to the Jews : 
" What did they cry in Hebrew ? " And the 
Jews said to him : " They cried Hosannah." 
And Pilate answered and said to them : " And 
what is the meaning of Hosannah ? " And 
the Jews answered : " Our Saviour." And 
Pilate said to them : " If you yourselves bear 
witness to the words which were uttered by 
your children, wherein has the messenger 
sinned ? " And when they heard this from 
Pilate, they held their peace. 



Old Text 
Then Pilate called for the messenger and 
said unto him : Wherefore hast thou done this, 
and hast spread thy kerchief upon the ground 
and made Jesus to walk upon it ? The 
messenger saith unto him : Lord governor, 
when thou sentest me to Jerusalem unto 
Alexander, I saw Jesus sitting upon an ass, 
and the children of the Hebrews held branches 
in their hands and cried out, and others spread 
their garments beneath him, saying : Save 
now, thou that art in the highest : blessed is 
he that cometh in the name of the Lord. 



The Jews cried out and said unto the 
messenger : The children of the Hebrews cried 
out in Hebrew : how then hast thou it in the 
Greek ? The messenger saith to them : I 
did ask one of the Jews and said : What is it 
that they cry out in Hebrew ? and he inter- 
preted it unto me. 



Pilate saith unto them : And how cried 
they in Hebrew ? The Jews say unto him : 
Hosanna membrome barouchamma adonai. 
Pilate saith unto them : And the Hosanna and 
the rest, how is it interpreted ? The Jews 
say unto him : Save now, thou that art in the 
highest : blessed is he that cometh in the name 
of the Lord. Pilate saith unto them : If you 
yourselves bear witness of the words which 
were said of the children, wherein hath the 
messenger sinned ? and they' held their peace. 



ADDITIONAL SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 



85 



New Text 

Then Pilate answered and said to the 
messenger : "Go out and bring Jesus here 
after what manner you wish." And when 
the messenger went out after Jesus, he did as 
before. He spread the kerchief and said to 
Jesus : " Our Lord, come and enter, for the 
governor calls you." 

When our Lord Jesus entered the judgment 
hall, people were standing before the judge 
and were carrying standards, 1 and these 
standards bowed their heads and worshipped 
Jesus. And when the Jews saw how he (the 
messenger) entered, and how the standards 
bowed and worshipped Jesus, they became 
angry, and their wrath rose. And they 
shouted greatly at those who were carrying 
the standards. Then Pilate answered and 
said to the Jews : " Did you not marvel at 
this wonder : how the heads of the standards 
bent down and worshipped Jesus ? You only 
shout at those who carried the standards 
which worshipped him." The Jews then said 
to Pilate : " We saw with our own eyes how 
those who carried the standards bowed and 
worshipped him." Then Pilate called those 
who were carrying the standards, and said to 
them : " Wherefore did you so ? " And they 
answered and said to the governor : "We are 
pagan men, and the servants of the Sanhedrin. 
How could we, therefore, worship . . . ? " 

(Caetera desunt.) 



1 The Syriac word is the Latin " signa." 



Old Text 

The governor saith unto the messenger : Go 
forth and bring him in after what manner 
thou wilt. And the messenger went forth and 
did after the former manner and said unto 
Jesus : Lord, enter in : the governor calleth 
thee. 

Now when Jesus entered in, and the ensigns 
were holding the standards, the images (busts) 
of the standards bowed and did reverence to 
Jesus. And when the Jews saw the carriage 
of the standards, how they bowed themselves 
and did reverence unto Jesus, they cried out 
above measure against the ensigns. But 
Pilate said unto the Jews : Marvel ye not 
that the images bowed themselves and did 
reverence unto Jesus ? The Jews say unto 
Pilate : We saw how the ensigns made them 
to bow and did reverence to him. And the 
governor called for the ensigns and saith 
unto them : Wherefore did ye so ? They say 
unto Pilate : We are Greeks and servers of 
temples, and how could we do him reverence ? 



Mingana Syriac 640 

2 53 x I 5 2 mm. 1 leaf of two columns. Thirty-six lines to the column. Vellum. 

The leaf, as seen from the colophon which I give below, belonged to a MS. containing mystical 
and theological treatises of a miscellaneous character. Towards the top of the leaf there is a long 
quotation of an ethical character from Xystus of Rome, as follows : 



86 MINGANA COLLECTION 

The MS. was written by Moses, who was from the country of Baith Suphnaye, in the monastery 
of " the monks in the mountain of Kedar," x for the monk Simon of the same monastery : 

oj oi-s )f.A.J ^_-; oi-\ ^».a.a.9 ^.9 .^_^bo/ ^>o<a^a.^\ yaj} )a*j otlo ^.^$*=> yjpoi I »inni 040 

It appears from a sentence in this colophon that the monks did not encourage other people 
to copy MSS. in order to spread knowledge. " And anyone who takes the MS. in order to copy 
from it ... is like one who commits sacrilege." 

No date. A neat Estrangela hand of about a.d. 780. Headings in red. 

On the obverse is an early note of reading partly rendered illegible by a layer of prepared 
papyrus pasted on it. I do not understand the reason for this curious process. 

Mingana Syriac 641 

252 x 167 mm. 1 leaf. Thirty lines to the page. Vellum. 

The leaf was culled from a MS. containing the Paradise of the Fathers by the East Syrian 
writer 'Enanlsho', who nourished in the first half of the seventh Christian century. 

Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. 

The text corresponds with that of Budge's translation (1907, vol. i., pp. 175-176) and 
contains the beginning of the life of the abbot James the Lame. It corresponds also (but with 
some variant readings) with that edited by Bedjan, Acta Martyrum et Sanctorum, vii. 164-166. 

^ooi... Jt-*^ J001 pa*, ^^ ^ioj ^oauJop; ^*» oiA ^ ^^ »lt—^» vdaax* ^* 

)*^~ J001 J^Aooj 

No date. A bold East Syrian Estrangela hand of about a.d. 850. Headings in red. 

Mingana Syriac 642 

253 x 169 mm. 2 leaves of two columns. Forty lines to the column. Vellum. 

The leaves were culled from a MS. containing pious anecdotes about the Fathers of the 
Desert, excerpted from the work entitled Paradise of the Fathers, by the East Syrian writer 
'Enanlsho'. 

The anecdotes do not figure in the order in which they are found in the Paradise of the 
Fathers. So on fol. 16 the anecdote dealing with the Emperor Theodosius the Younger and an 
Egyptian monk in Constantinople is in Budge's translation found in vol. ii., p. 104, while on fol. 26 
the anecdote of the abbot Serapion passing near an Egyptian village is in Budge's translation 
found in vol. i., p. 268. See the text in Bedjan, Acta Martyrum et Sanctorum, vii. 306-307. See 
also ibid., pp. 215-217. 

1 This monastery of the mountain of Kedar, or Mount Kedar, may possibly be that of Mount Sinai. 



ADDITIONAL SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 87 

The anecdote dealing with the abbot Serapion begins : 

No date. Written in an East Syrian Estrangela hand of about a.d. 900. Headings in red 

Mingana Syriac 643 

2 35 x I 5 2 mm. 1 leaf. Thirty-three lines to the page. Vellum. 

The leaf was culled from a MS. containing the work entitled Paradise of the Fathers by the 
East Syrian writer 'Enanisho', who nourished in the first half of the seventh Christian century. 

The text that the leaf contains deals with the temptations of the abbot Pachomius, which 
correspond with vol. i., pp. 129-130 of Budge's translation. 

Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. The first extant words are : 

No date. A clear and handsome East Syrian Estrangela hand of about a.d. 730. 

Mingana Syriac 644 

231 x 157 mm. 1 leaf of two columns. Twenty-eight lines to the column. Vellum. 
The leaf was culled from a MS. apparently containing the Centuries of Evagrius. The 
" Capita " found in the leaf are 24-33. 
The twenty-fifth begins : 

.^« a$ ft v> Jjuf . yiOv J-*J£^» fcfa voouaoo )fcJb> voou^oo JK^^V Jjo^jcuj voouio -op 

No date. A clear Estrangela hand of about a.d. 630. Rubricated. 

Mingana Syriac 645 

131 x 178 mm. 1 leaf. Vellum. 

A fragmentary leaf of double columns, emanating from a MS. containing mystical, exegetical 
and theological matter. 

I will give a quotation from the reverse of the leaf, with two glosses. 

The glosses, which are written in the space separating the two columns, are : 
No date. A clear Estrangela hand of about a.d. 830. 



88 MINGANA COLLECTION 

Mingana Syriac 646 

217 x 150 mm. 2 leaves of two columns. Thirty-three lines to the column. Vellum. 

The leaves emanate from a MS. containing the poetical maimre of a Syrian Father. The 
particular subject treated in them is that of Leah and Rachel and the figure which they represent 
for the New Testament. 

The text is written in poetry, and is in the twelfth syllable metre favoured by both Narsai 

and Jacob of Serug. 

A strophe on fol. xa is : 

.Jtooi vjt***! Jk-^kJ )lAo ^*-; )k.;<^J : "O01 ^Justoo > ^*—^» Jlp>o )-^> JKaojs 

No date. A clear Estrangela hand of about a.d. 750. 
Fol. 2,0, is damaged by damp. 

Mingana Syriac 647 

139 x 105 mm. 2 leaves. Eighteen lines to the page. Vellum. 

The leaves were culled from a MS. containing poetical maimre of a Syrian Father. The 
particular subject treated in them is that of the merits and demerits of the human body which 
emanates from a single man, Adam. 

The text is written in the seventh syllable metre. The 'unitha on fol. 2a is : 

.K^u^ui)}; y-»\ 0|*3 w— sKaIj fcs-»j-3 )t"fep? v^po yS» J M-SOJ .)KaJQ^ 

No date. A clear and bold Estrangela hand of about a.d. 850. Headings in red. I 
adjusted the leaves, which were misplaced by the binder. 

Mingana Syriac 648 

214 x 150 mm. 2 leaves of two columns. Thirty-two and thirty-three lines to the column. 
Vellum. 

The leaves were culled from a MS. containing the works of St. John Chry60stom. 
The heading on fol. ib is : 

No date. A clear Estrangela hand of about a.d. 750. Headings in red. 
I adjusted the leaves, which had been misplaced by the binder. 



ADDITIONAL SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 89 

Mingana Syriac 649 

247 x 170 mm. 1 leaf. Thirty-five lines to the page. Vellum. 
The leaf was culled from a MS. containing mystical works. 
The heading on fol. la is : 

No date. A clear Estrangela hand of about a.d. 820. 

At the top of the page is the word (-a/; in red, and at the bottom of the page is the number 
11, doubtless marking the quire of the volume. 

Mingana Syriac 650 

303 x 223 mm. 2 leaves of two columns. Forty lines to the column. Vellum. 
The leaves were culled from a MS. containing a mystical work. 
The heading on fol. la is : 

No date. Written in a slightly bold Estrangela hand of about a.d. 950. Headings in red. 
I adjusted the leaves, which had been misplaced by the binder. Fol. 2a is marked at the 
top in Arabic as " the seventh," a word doubtless denoting the quire of the volume. 

Mingana Syriac 651 

273 x 176 mm. 2 leaves of two columns. Thirty-five and thirty-six lines to the column. 
Vellum. 

The leaves were culled from a MS. containing exegetical and theological matter. 
Incomplete at the beginning and at the end, and no regular heading. 
The first extant words are : 

No date. A clear Estrangela hand of about a.d. 650. 
The text of the two leaves is not continuous. 

Mingana Sytiac 652 

249 x 168 mm. 1 leaf of two columns. Thirty-three and thirty-four lines to the column. 
Vellum. 

The leaf was culled from a MS. containing a work on zoology, or more precisely on the 
creation of the animals. 

I will give below the text and its translation. 

No date. Written in a clear but not handsome Estrangela hand of about a.d. 670. 



go MINGANA COLLECTION 

) K n -.. .)loO~? )M-> ^? J*-*** -*A-l! t^oiKj ^ Jo* Ni? >>t^ ^ ^^^o 

o^ pa^ JJ; ^M Jiji Mi-*>J )t^>? M»* ^ W H*° •V*» J ! X* 1 ^ ""^ 

j^po *$I ~otof»jo oo. j^-^oo 6m*> ? ^-! ooi .<**>/ )la-;JJ J^ )ooi Ml? U<H, /4 <** 
)la*> e op ^ol ^ M<» .V ma2, ° v^^J^j ^/ V po/, p* ^J ^o opoj, 

.)^ Jj^o; )^*Oo ot-L*>» -oi ^»o )K-Jj^oia^ s^owfcoo; J^J poi 
JKpo ^o ♦,-"-- ; ^-0*00; ^po K-^o Jlck~^ oiM^ ^0> M JJ; ^opo ^^Doi *^ 
fcJk* jo** ^op* M -a** JJ $aJL; ooi v | JioJU. ^ifij Jlap^> i^^-op* .)i<"A.*£*>! 
tV op )oo, JJ? ^^op* )oow ? ~o,o^ looi Ij^s; ^opo Jlo .^^ ^* ^op> ^oAoo M*~»? 
^ ^jo, -^op> ycuo ^ol JKal*~ U* ^*>/ !°~"^ IM"? JA^W*^! ^! JJ**~ 
U^3 ? IJ^JiU./ V ? JloJLA .(p^; J*^a»J^? ^-J ^-oow ^-op.? Jtooi ,<-^*Oo ^Ao, 
4*4* ^op. ^» ^W V YQ>\ mOA ^ojo soao? ^o; JboJ J-x^ ^ .^-op> ^ai» ^oi >i* 
y, ) V X oP> (sic) ^Lopo v .i»v> Jl (sic) (J^aaaeo ^P^j JK^a J~;o/ ^bo ? ^/» > ^ooo 
v9$a^Oo p? ^ot.v>r>9>\ JUKJ ^a^J ^^>Kio; )o^e ooi; ^-otia^i. ^>ol ^-^ w»ow ^s/j 

.^jQM^Joi^o ^.->oi^»i^ )oog» >-o— Kjljo ■ iyinNKj oij» 
Jl^^v* Ij-j ^p ^.iil? Jlasojo (l^Vaot l^^so/ )i.oJL-*; )i>VA-» M ^-J4^ ^-^ )<>oi Jl 

)a^ ^aofcooj v-^v^' $1* ***** ^r* *•" J 1 ^^ ' i ^'° »' a V°? r* 01 * 00 ' ^P° ^ 

Jli<^ ? oi^j-a^ J*Jo/ filial ^oo .)loJL- ? ^oila^Dpo, )la m^ ^ v>-> ^^doi ;<w 
(^tf>;ol piJ ^oiloS. )^oo)^oo ^>}Jioo pj w^moX^V; Jla-a* lo^ opoo; ^ ^sAoK^io (ooi? 

(Caetera desunt) s£&\ ^j>»j J-SLuo.^ ^oo )vx^ ^o ^oioJL^f 

Let us go back now to the subject we had intended to discuss, which is the history of the 
creation of the animals. 

The animals which are constantly hunted are very prolific by their nature. This is the 
reason why rabbits are by nature made to reproduce themselves abundantly. The same may 
be said of the mountain goats and the sheep of the plain, which constantly give birth to twins, 
so that their species may not be exterminated by carnivorous animals which eat much meat. 
As to the animals which usually die a natural death, they often give birth to one offspring. So 
a lioness often gives birth to one cub only. When this cub is born of its mother, it tears the 



ADDITIONAL SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 91 

womb of its mother with its claws. So assert those who are expert in the habits of these animals. 
A viper also reproduces itself in the same way, and the offspring which comes out of it eats with 
its mouth the mouth of the womb of its mother and comes out, a fitting reward given to the 
mother by her offspring, which shows the nature of this offspring ! 

There is nothing in nature which has no divine providence about its creation, and there is 
nothing created which does not fit into the general order. Indeed, if you examine the parts 
which animals possess, you will not find in them anything useless, which was placed aimlessly x 
in them by their Maker, and there is nothing that was necessary to be in them which has not 
been placed in them. 

The animals which feed only on meat, the Creator has made and placed in them sharp 
teeth. These were necessary for a diet of raw meat. And He made and placed in other animals 
teeth of only half this sharpness. On the one hand, He provided for them on the earth different 
kinds and varieties of food ; but because they are not able to crush the food the first time when 
they begin to eat, their Maker gave them the faculty through which what is swallowed comes 
back and rises to their mouth, so that while they are ruminating it, it may be masticated and 
crushed, and thus redound to their comfort and benefit. Indeed, it is not to no purpose that 
there is in many animals the scheme of regurgitation and the shape of two stomachs, one of which 
receives the food which is to be ruminated, and the other receives the food which is to be digested. 

There are organs established inside the animals over which their food has to pass, and in 
which that food is assimilated for their existence. Their Maker in this way supplied the need 
of each one of them when creating them. 

Look now at the symmetry of the composition of the animals ! Look how the length of the 
neck of a camel is as long as from the height of the camel down to the level of its feet ! This has 
been arranged so that when it bends and reaches them it may provide for the sustenance of its 
life from the roots and shrubs which are on the surface of the (earth). 

• 

Mingana Syriac 653 

267 x 161 mm. 1 leaf. Twenty-eight lines to the page. Vellum and palimpsest, of which 
both the upper- and the under-writing are in Syriac. 

UPPER-WRITING 

Homily in the twelfth syllable metre, probably by Jacob of Serug. 
The first couplet is : jloVlJi ^eoKaaao X|Jj UuKjxl^o jJo 

It deals with the wonderful way bees do their work ; and with the fact that thorny bushes 
like rose-trees produce the most beautiful flowers. 

No date. -Clear Melchite hand of about a.d. 1200. 

UNDER-WRITING 
Numbers xxvi. 15-48. 
No date. Early Estrangela hand of about a.d. 450-500. 



1 Lit. " inordinately," " wickedly." 



92 MINGANA COLLECTION 

Mingana Syriac 654 

244 x 164 mm. 2 leaves. Thirty-three and thirty-four lines to the page. Vellum. 
The leaves emanate from a MS. possibly containing the works of Jacob of Serug, and deal 
with the Passion of our Lord. 
The two final strophes are : 

.)oO| P / P | iiQ,"vS> )}jo 

No date. A West Syrian Estrangela hand of about a.d. 1050. 

Mingana Syriac 655 

213 x 159 mm. 1 leaf. Twenty-five lines to the page. Vellum. 

The leaf was culled from a MS. containing mysticism. 

Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. The first extant words are : 

.otaav oi^.; wJ^oto )«>\>io> ^00 oi)~u» ^-a^ o^. 
A heading on fol. lb is : 

.po/o JjL^O^ wOSO .^jj )A-JJ 

No date. A Melchite hand of about a.d. 1100. 

At the bottom of the leaf and in its margin is an inscription, in a Melchite hand, to the 
effect that the MS. belonged to the monastery of Mount Sinai. 

Mingana Syriac 656 

190 x 134 mm. 1 leaf. Twenty-two lines to the page. Vellum. 

The leaf was culled from a MS. and contains a maimra on penitence and admonition, by 
St. Ephrem. 

The maimra, which is in the seventh syllable metre, begins : 

No date. A Melchite hand of about a.d. 1050. Headings in red. 

Mingana Syriac 657 

267 x 169 mm. 1 leaf. Twenty-three lines to the page. Vellum. 
The leaf was culled from a MS. containing the Melchite breviary. 
A section on fol. lb begins : 

.)Zo_Q_»J_3 (sic) <X~ji|j Qt»K-=> ^09 ^-^Ol j-~ »— ^^ p°2 J-liOO JJJ 

On fol. la Iscls>q^ is written as j-ca.sa^ , and on fol. lb Jjl^o^ is written as Jjj-aa^ . 
No date. A Melchite hand of about a.d. 1200. Rubricated. 



ADDITIONAL SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 93 

Mingana Syriac 658 

271 x 195 mm. 1 leaf of two columns. Twenty-two and twenty-three lines to the column. 
Vellum. 

The leaf was culled from a MS. containing a lectionary from the Gospels, from the Book of 
Acts, and from the Pauline Epistles, according to the Melchite Church. 

The leaf is precious, as it gives the last lines and the colophon of the MS. which was written 
in the monastery of St. Pantaleemon, in the district of the town of Seleucia, built on the " black 
mountain which is called the head of the pig." The MS. was finished by (the priest ?) John, son 
of Joseph, on a Wednesday, 20th of May, of the year 1339 of the Greeks (a.d. 1028). 

I give here all the colophon : 

^ .JL^.id) ;Ka; J^lao*^ ^00 .JI^ad ^00 ).^..a. \ j > 1 m imip ^0 jjU^O J^oo. s *io\ 
^a\o .)l^a^D ^00 [....Nil >_coa\<x2> ? Ht-^/ xj° U-»+* JJ^a ^©a^ ^j\ )Ka$ \K*xi J^o^A 

yoL+±>o )?J^J j^O<X- "^J^ JjL^OO .J-i-V- ^c^./ Ju| ^choK-/j JKjul Ju| ^30 )fxbo ^DjJ^d 

.)Kjla? 6«, ml\o i\ )^ep. jl^xaoo JlAoo<o Jju^o )pooj o£^*> )-J.a\aa/ oua 
^*j |j-.»-o ^A .o£^o ^».3ot4 °*~ s Yl».m ; )oi u»o_-;ar> aioo/1 o£^ po/Aooj ^*J )}).^ ^9 

Wj (-^ODoJ-3 K-OAO JKik^A JJLoJL#Mj jfflNoOO .OOlaIo )t-Q-|o J$)0^> ^*f (kj-j-O Ut-^ 

.)V->—» Oi.JL-.j JjloAoo? Jjmloo/ J$a^> )-^-»-=>? «-fa| 

(JLIA ^O OP ^J I >OCL*i $»./ )—t"" => ^***lo ^»&Mo JJ^O^Mo *flS*> KiA Ja^D ^-.J ^AA 

♦<.rtio?> »\ »ft V- 29 J-*Joj-abo aooj t imi\i 
U±o ^.boj );~^> )iiA.v.d >P&^° )^9i ^>j u^cd; JK^oJl > * . *v «»» J^/ ^o^.^Kj ^.po Ji 

•j-^o*o(? ).nNv) ^oup/ v-.oioK-/j voi./ ^-.i»J^ y^l ^-po jog/ 

(Caetera desunt) ^0)^00 (.xaL^omN v>»o .(.^-.0-^ ^.-Xdo (sic) )^>ojj^ ^^; )K^ixa^ 



MINCxANA COLLECTION 
94 

XXfKK- ££*2S that the priest Thomas died on the Epiphany day of 
the year 1537 of the Greeks (a.d. 1226). 

Mingana Syriac 659 

245 x 161 mm. 1 leaf. Twenty-four lines to the page. Vellum and palimpsest, of which 
both the upper- and the under-writing are in Syriac. 

UPPER-WRITING 
The leaf was culled from a MS. containing a Melchite Breviary. It exhibits part of the 

office for Palm Sunday. 
The first heading is : 

.\1*, li_^, ^euli^to^ .jIoj^Ao^ ^~c^ ^*4*** ^i^ ^Jo 

A strange feature of fol. » is that all the long prayer which is found in it and the beginning 
of wmSTmisS is written in Greek but in Syriac characters. I wdl g.ve here a specunen 
of this kind of writing from the first extant words of the text. 

* b ° 

No date. A clear Melchite hand of about a.d. iooo. Headings in red. 

UNDER-WRITING 

Exodus xxx. 

No date. A clear Estrangela hand of about a.d. 000. 

Mingana Syriac 660 

170 x 126 mm. 1 leaf. Fifteen and seventeen lines to the page. 

The leaf is in the Palestinian Syriac dialect. 

On the reverse begins the song of Miriam the sister of Moses (Exodus xv. 1-5). 

!*•», o,M y-PO! «J* oot ho, — M/ «* V*^ -** H ^^° ^ 

On the obverse is Psalm cxliii. 8-12, ending : W M /j-^ 

No date. A Palestinian Syriac hand of about a.d. 1140. Headings in red. 

Mingana Syriac 661 

a«xi«56mm. 4 leaves. From thirty-two to thirty-five lines to the page 
A medical work excerpted from Rufus, Galen, Dioscorides and Hippocrates. It deals mostly 
with the medical properties of herbs. 



ADDITIONAL SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 95 

The headings are : 

Fol. ia : JKj^*9 Jj^os ^^» [o»ajL]^^; . . . \\^\\ Jjo*^ ^>» ^a.3o$» 
Fol. lb : )£olx*9 )^Vqj "^ uqd<u„X^; . . . (Lao* J-a.^ \m* ^b» [■ «^, ,]; aAa ^>n 

.Jka^ ^b» uja^^afln/j . . . JKa^ ^» vXDojuX^j . . . 
Fol. 2fl : s-floa3o»; . . . j^ooio jLso )Ip ^^ JLaoa*;; . , . )ipo jlpo j^ooi "^ tfiaa*}; 

.j^oolo )ipo jfp ^\ 
Fol. 2b : JK*Va^,3 ^^ ;a^floa^jj . . . )J^Va^o ^^ joojlA^i . . . )>p» "^j^ t^i ^V, ; 
Fol. 3« : "^ j»<u A ^ ? . . . ^^9^sdJ "^^ ^X^? . . . )K&^ "^ ^>o r ',*sLm<xs» 

.JL^aa ^i, jaij-ooa^;j . . . Jl^S 
Fol. 3b : Jj*olo jij^ >! ^ %.^ ? . . . jL^ad "^ wxoasojj . . . jL^as ^^ ^joo^/, 

Fol. 4a : )K^L39 )Kx^> )^n^ ^Jk . «>o i »\,.^> 

Fol. 46 : JKsStot )IaX-j )l^flo-=> ^> ^-^? • • • )"^N<^o )jo'»Ui>o J^a^ "^ joa^o-** 

On fol. 36 is the heading " the compiler " Junvt), which proves that the work is a com- 
pilation, by an author, from the ancient Greek physicians. 

The leaves do not seem to give a continuous text. 

No date. Written in an early East Syrian hand bordering on a West Syrian sirta of about 
a.d. 1100. Headings in red. 

Mingana Syriac 662 

245 x 183 mm. 3 leaves of two columns. Forty-one lines to the column. Vellum. 

A long fragment from a voluminous work dealing with Graeco-Roman history and mythology. 

Incomplete at the beginning and at the end. Twenty-three chapters are missing between 
ff. 1-2, and eighteen chapters between ff. 2-3. 

No date. Clear Estrangela hand of about a.d. 800. Headings in red. 

There are a few holes in the MS., with the consequent disappearance of some letters. 

On the margin of fol. zb is an Arabic inscription which states that the MS. belongs to a 
monastery (probably Mount Sinai), and that the curse of God will be on anyone who takes it 
from that monastery. 

As the work is important, and represents the only complete and systematic Syriac work on 
Graeco-Roman history and mythology, I will transcribe below all the text. The letters and 
half-words between square brackets are supplied by me, as they have disappeared in the MS. 
owing to the holes spoken of above. I will give here a short summary of the chapters of the 
MS., which are called " stories." 

It should here be stated that some details in the stories as narrated by the author are not 
always in harmony with the established Greek sources to which we have access in our days. 

End of gth story : On Menoeceus, a descendant of those who sprang from the dragon's teeth, 
who gave himself up to death in order to spare his city from war ; and on Creon his father. 



96 MINGANA COLLECTION 

ioth story (which is the first complete story in the MS.) : On the daughters of Scedasus of 
Leuctra, who, having been ravished by some Lacedaemonians, were killed by them ; and on the 
defeat of the Lacedaemonians at Leuctra. 

nth : On the tests of manliness practised by the Lacedaemonians. 

12th :. On the human sacrifices offered to Artemis, in spite of the fact that she was a virgin 
and considered to be a chaste goddess. 

13th : On the hemlock drunk by Socrates, after he had been accused by Anytus and Melitus 
of introducing strange gods into the country, and condemned to death as being a corrupter of 
youth. 

14th : On the " slavery " of Epictetus, who asserted that as long as his soul was not bound 
he was not a slave. 

15th : On Anaxarchus who, while being pounded in a stone mortar, exclaimed : " Pound, 
pound the body of Anaxarchus, because it is not Anaxarchus that you are pounding ! " 

16th : On Cleombrotus, who, having read the Phczdon of Plato, jumped from a rampart so 
that his soul might be separated from his body. 

iyth : On the fact that the Pythagoreans were not allowed to eat beans. 

18th : On the death of Theano the Pythagorean, who bit off her tongue rather than disclose 
the secrets of her country. 

igth : On Epaminondas and Scipio Africanus, who through their ascetic life became great 
generals. 

End of 43rd : On Julian the Apostate, and on the meaning of the titles Idolianus, Pisseus, 
Adonaeus, and Bull-burner, given to him by Gregory Nazianzen. 1 

44th : On KephaXfj, the vixen, and on the epithet KefiaXdos as applied to Julian. 2 

45th : On the soothsayers Melampus and Proteus, and on their ability to assume different 
forms. 

46th : On the fire of Etna, which is likened to the breathing of one of the Gigantes. 

47th: On the eighty trials undergone by the followers of Mithras, and on the rituals 
performed in his honour. 

48th : On the tyrants iEacides of Epirus and Phalaris of Sicily, who were both famous as 
torturers ; and on the fact that the latter invented a brazen bull into which those who had to be 
tortured were cast. 

End of 66th : On the God Dionysus, in connection with wine. 

6jth : On the difference between astrology, astronomy, geometry, magism, geomancy, 
necromancy, and sorcery. 

68th : On divination by means of dreams, said to have been first invented by the inhabitants 
of Telmessus of Lycia. 

6gth : On different varieties of augury, said to have been first invented by Telaginus (or 
Tages). The methods of augury are differentiated according to the sources of observation, which 
are : a bird ; an incident taking place in a house ; an occurrence on a journey ; an accidental 
happening to the ear, the eye, the nose, the shoulder or the thigh. 

yoth : On the revolt of the slaves of the pastoral Scythians against their masters, and on 
the strategem by which they were subdued. This stratagem consisted in the masters using a 



Gregory Nazianzen, Contra Julianum, i., in Pat. Gr. xxxv. 603. 2 Ibid. 606. 



ADDITIONAL SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 97 

whip instead of a weapon, as the former denoted their superiority, while the latter denoted 
equality. 

yist : On the Thessalian horses and the Lacedaemonian women, and on the fact that every 
country has some particular product for which it is famous, such as the silver mines of Athens 
and the gold ore of India. 

(jyo 000001)^0 ),ot J^J P .J4^» omlSJ ^Kj JjlXjXj U* x *> <*-!? v^ 01 • ' • 

.^oto*J vp/Vi> t^^ W<^ omlSu ^>ou fa* ^f )Kj-p^ &b"*l 
.Jjot v » otJM .[^dq« ? Ja]W? otAou* ^^ [J*^* 1 ] Jm^j 
vooC^; (Jij^o ^ ^/j a^j JjirfJI ao; u^oj ;k^> ^o a»cu»)ja3Q^ad; ^J-o-a ptJa*^ 
v? ot-M .J*£*<&> ^ ol/ p JJW*^ vO^^Kj; ^t* ^ M* s *^ °^° r 90 v^* * 
Joot v ; Jjl~ Jjl>JI ? L^Mu* ^oj-JL^as/ «^jj po .o^ a^>J .ua-W* JAa-p* J ? ot 
AM o*> )oot Mo .)ooi -ok>M Jt^ock ^ wi»ai»;)jcu» .);ot ^? )*^ ^f ptioao^ 
JK3L\jCk (j^a~* op»j <-otlo^ ^A©y yoL^i ^>i ^oj*j^ ^*> ^ ? ^JUj/ .)ka* 
Jt^oo^ v , )JJ p (V j|^ ^-oio^JI )loJLj ^VAJ J^M* JjUa*)^ ^ooi c^-,; p 

.)^oo^ ,J* JjUaiOj-o^ Jlai^ajpo Ao;>/ hot '^oo .yOA^J 

.)1qd; loot J-soi-.Aoo Joot yfl>v» .. v> ^K-j oo^o ooot 
.*&**£;{ ^ JAs^jJ. v? ot-M .J^kk ^>? **>! ^> ofM IfmylVij )K-^1 
4xUft{0(|] \M+l Np t-^-Uj loot J^- ot-M I^AiJo )*^*>K* p )lo^ J;oi 
wotoK-./ ^io ot^LL^a ^i^afl) .axL^i_ocu»j ycujafl "^. oi»M )?L£^NM; JK^aI 
^xdo^oj} w^to^ c&oj> );1JI ^OLbo J-paj J'jjAf ^6 y~l Jjo£, U»««^ ** v? « lo J^" MJ I 001 
.K~* ~M po ).g.\fa |j^~*> ^-Z laxuo vo-jao JKaj; ^^^^jo, ^^1/ .uxx^Jl^o 
^»/y, )oot ~otoJM )Anm\.ft ^»o^o^a-^/ .a»a^-^a-^/> px* ^Jw )pai^>;/ ? )K^aI 
o/ ^V*!? Kj/ |J»j Uaot 06.U U*U loot -oto-MJj M-i M»J r*> J I^Jt^o? M^^o ^> on*** 
,)^x>J JJ ^ oulSuj ^6 y4 .oot W »-»/ *-^ Uio ^id v » oot .^^ux^/ 

•w.o,o-a* oi^ j^lo .^ Jl/ W t-a wotoM )f^ o^j v-^)po/^° 

flOOD^QftAj/ ^^ oi-K-/ li.m MV ) ..; 

JKupo^ -*>*« IJoVi a»ojbj/ ^o j-U/ p )joi Joot -otoM ts om\^ .ax>ao^^i 



'Cod. j-iJOt-CL^O! |.i2\30 
♦ • 

7 



9 8 MINGANA COLLECTION 

.^oa^jj/, oiK.^N cko; wAo; o£» po/ )°« ^M*oo ^.9 j^ ♦) m » r> ; Jlaoaa^ )oot ^*.;Kioo 

) <*> « ^ )ooi J.~oo^bo/ ^eofxH'f^aojLo .v.£oa^/^ i °oJL>j )1»QlA "^ <**K-./ JyA^K*}; 
o^> v^bo/j )p°N vOf 3 )-^ U<* ^^p ^xDoi p -Jk-a^o. upo,-^/; )Ki*j^o oi-»k-*J ^-.j );oi 
K-^oo );oa ^*> oulSlj Jp )v^ r^» Jjla$o3 ) . * , ? > i \ 01^ ;a> ^t-/o J-**-* ^^ v^^> 

)poV r-o ^Ao) > | * aaa ^o» wxoo^ias ^so [fl n m\ > ° >9 —otok-./ )mi^ J-ocl^K^s 

JJj Jpo; )joio Jj£~J ^Aoi ^ab> Joot ^oXKjl*o .(sic) ) loa mX .. °> 9 jla^a, oooi ^ Sv>»v> 

[iOO^ ^iOj > ^O0| [. . .] ) ^ »<> ..\ )jU9 kw-3 OOOI ^^JLm J^OO JjSOO^S J^O.900 .. « i \ .. (..Xjijj 

.^o/ [. . .] ^>?; IJm [. . .] 

.)»oi ^-*; ot-JW .)J^»;cL^iod ucoj/Ij oiioio > ^i> ot-K../ ) ymv i» JL; 
j.o (jo^j woiasj^ J^o; oi-iaX 1*oj j-d );oi .otjl/; JjJV po/ij )jo^ ^20 J;ot ^.9 ij-~/l| 

.JLoj yox^jo/ 61^ ^a-;lKio; ^owa JL^l JJS^Jioo yj JJ ^a/i )-^3j 
tV n ■ 9») n mo ^apo*JoJuOAaj ^^ ot*k-*J )y,m\il» 
)ooio l^oo^a; ).->j n*> ..jttoZ/i )^; JL— ^=>; )ooi ^oioK^{ )-^/l cnmi^> uoo^i o i > v > »°>) 
(ftsvj ^00 )J^3j^o ^00 ^^& )ooi ^floacufc^o <ja\ nv> p (jot .J^jo^v las opoJ IN ». 9> » ) ^ooX l 
ya » °>) n mo »)jLifiv> t n\ ^ ^oo\ ya~*s>l Jlooj » )-=>Vo; )JL-o pot "^oo .JJLm IoJ^joi ot^o ^00 
\.^ n-> )ooi ^-\po s-xoo^jaJL^s/j )>,8Xao )l w ,io Jlaio^ oi-s J^^oooiV; )ooi jLw- ^>» 001 ^d/ ^r*? 
.) » n .^3/ yp » °>) n m >-*t-oi.|o |_joa^ JKaLOOoJ, » S,m> )^a^> ^*ow^^j» wioi ^°? 001 .(--uo^p 1q\j 
po| .o«Io\j )oi^a». ^bo vttaiAaA )t-o-J? ^ ^/ ^*^*? po)jo ^ .. ^; wflDQ 4^»Kx * * • 
^•9 v.i»oj ,),m i^i wAoj^t jrt^; ^6 y^l \ »fn*fto )pKd > ... JS> ?> ^»{ J^pKd ««*oio »t n ' "^-ooi 
^oio^ot^ajjf wojjj ^a2oi po| Jps? oi-K^/ JKjupo ^.j ) >m >^> .)ooi ^jo— fcoo jKjupo )m »°>^ 
t-^o; vjx>ai-AQu.j t-^^ po/J^o .att.*Joj/ ^.^bo )_*Jo»/o ^»o>S.j ^-/ ) « m »» acaJ-AaJS. 
^^> ^-*? ^.^.ol/ .joot ^oioJ^t{ JjLj^d ^^ p 1^.50^3/ oiK-^; ^m.^jo»| ^9 )joi ♦> m » 109JJ 
s-m^)» ) » \vxtv> U>'£2>)1 j-oaio wdtt^Qtaau; ^ojjj ^*9 po) .|.^.»o^aJ-3 u»j/ ^9 wioi^ u»;/ 

Jot^JJ ^oa^oo )ooi 
(Iojl-o )o»ioKjuio Jij^oo w'oi ^w. .)KS^l 01-K-/ JljjJ^ "^J^ oi-*K-./ ^aV)o ^x^V/j 
^aKcaio )^v*9j )^-^ tr*? .fflcaxbo .JJL^i )ta*_*« (901 ot*K«{ )K,t.>.->o V-^^ )NX-OJ .)J.n^ > .oo 



1 A lacuna of twenty-three and a half chapters. 



ADDITIONAL SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS 99 

J^a; p j»<uAcl,j otJM )?oi u»QL.v^t-^ J-*oi^ poj* Vjjoi ~oi .^oojj otf-3 ;m/ )ooi 

.jJL?/; )..vnrt>ls J^>» )j-i^ j-^ otl ow-> )ooi ) ° >»» v> )ooi ^oiotw| 

.(sfc) vot&a V-^-^o Uxu*a )j)jl Jooio .Jooi (*>oj*o ^^)oi pot .*xo-^o$ot ~oi<ia* "^ua boi; 
jj; ok ^j*> voio ^j J,oik ja^-^jLboo .1<**>M *m-^p|* )ij>^ (sic) ud<*3o \j<* ^M°° 
JAsjuovd JL^o ^oiok-J jx>ojO u»oAia\|.*>° ^; (j*oi .JK* r laaa-t^o (laiooj* ou*> yckfAJ 
^~J Jooi -oioM ^■^■..KjLbO) v5"« V? ^ "^ , '* J, ~ a ~ i0 > 1 ' ? ^o^» v V J*^ ^^ 

)ouoKj*>j JKi^io M )?ow* •^» , ^-/ ojl^^J* J^euuflDj JAoJ 6t-M |l$J^ )K^>^a ^ P 
J;<^ ^.j )voJ^o ^^jsoo ji|^» J;<u I^J? oo. ^*> );<^ M )jl^>? oi-Oo ^^i^o (sic) ^±fi 
^-J? Jjlsu/ J^a*; -Jbo| ovM )joi oi^s );oj );oi .a»a£ms/oi? U^/o ^j V M>^*> -W 
.);qj )>ot ^opo )J^-oCSso ^j 6*M .J-**Jfco*» );oj ? JJooi ^ Jj^o 7 J )?*lo )i|i )>ow 
yft.,^1 JJo );ajj );ow );; ~^ ^?o )joi );a£-=»' — r>K*J o** )<>.* .ajJ W? ^»« ^M^* 
J- ? ; ^jy> ftsnm^Jjo )^>f opp^a*) ^*> )$<u Xj-^l/o ~oiaaJJ ou^o ^** v > P^ v©*^? 

V ' v -xff> )>^.J a»o;K-J>o .)joi ^-» 6mM .^»o»^^>? )-QJ^ ^* • , *^ AO \T^'' ? 

^^/Aoo .).m..o uoioM jjiaJu. JI; oMlSJ ^^ Ja-^o V^J )-^<" voo^^J ^A ^oojK^io; 
^uj ^/j JboJUio; ooC^ V^J? oi^ a>;j 'J-vop; ycJo^ ^oJUaI vOOuM ^^i? t-^ 

jj ? )w^ ^^? - 3010 I**** ^^^ 'r^? ^fJ*^ " J V D I* " 1 * ^° ? IJv - " wS ^ Kj? 

axxi^W .);oi ^-j ouM© (sic) odojqSajo wxoa^/j )la^t- ^^ omM -^ 1o <^ aV '? 

up yoLOLSQ ^J> )oot ^Aio )ooi ~oioK-J J-Jld w^» p )joi .u»o*-*3j? )ooi w-oioK-/ ).^io 
pojj J^Jaa ^/j Uau/ oooi ^ijJ^o J-** A«^ v^ajlili ^xdo- J1»j oooi ^^j! v^ ! ^*r^ 
woioM Jj** 7-/? ^.? (sic) w^j-VSo .JjliX^* vooi^? )JMa-^o ^a^o u»a^W ick c^^^oo 
^ )joi ,).,N,.ft.(t> oMttJ^ ^^ )ooi -cibM .JXj— J-a£i*l ? )ooi ^li^o P« -»|o )ooi 
^> !j? w-o^ (.jl^jj )i}oi ^oj Ut-^ ^)^»o )ooi s-oioM J-** t-^? ^o^ >J ^ ^<^><^-!^ V*** 
JL> ^oip ^-^o vr ^-o «a^ ^ooi P! )^-/ Vr ^- Ji*^ ^^^-! V^ ^ <^<>P^ 

2 . . . p Jijol; v^^ - 10 )WL? 6i-ioaa-3 



'Cod 



). xJoi-3? . 2 A lacuna of eighteen chapters. 



I00 MINGANA COLLECTION 

udcudom ^o Jpa|>] )po/K*> ax>aj^-/ ^ .^A^ ^ J^Ao ^ch ^1? \A. ^ . . • 
u»a»ai~» ^oot Jj<* .^>atf>aj.. ? s-otoM? v^' •*** WW] ^ J ,?01 "^^ i% ~ aK Wl 
u U|o )pa~ pf© ^jJo .ck^ij Jiopt J**** o^ ^*** a»ojpx-J ^M» ^5?° uftojlj) )« p 
[o]t*» (-*>r* )-*^*> 1o-~a* ^^o o-°* P v? )i<^V -v?*-*'! ) laV ^ V - =>OUO 00t ^ 

.^OlO^^AO UDOJ^O->( ^° [*]*P»U? 

. . . [a]~**| p^o 0} M£*> oj. Jc^JJ — ^ -0.! v > ^ -P^ (sic) ^ iaJ ^ x> ' ^^r J5 

^jj ')oo, 4£ Jl 5 -o. ^0 aa^ a*,*, JL*j* *-**/ x^! Ut*"*-K -Mj^^P^ V ^ Vl 
a***!* Uoo,o .J^^'vootiK^o Mpo a-ju} ;A v ? JWa^oo .Mlt fcj^Q* ^fo ^;M> 
^ov* .|l«iH ^ («&) Wo^o («fc) W/o^ ^o )la*o^o v? M^^o .)la^K^^ 

4JM ^? («&>) UW<H> V 6 ' Ka *« ^^ ^°° ,K ^ ~^ '^ ^ M '*"** '^^ 

v? ^Ja^ .;opo )Kjl^ ? l^ouafi ^00 J?oj* J^> ^>pAoo? )k^> -p* J t ft )K-P> 
.Jla*> ^ J)opo Ja ? a*u>; )^o v ; Jicu*~ .)pa> K^> )oo, ? JMo JAo^^Vjoo l**M 

^po )o« ? 00! v / P^ 000, v po/ .)io« v? ^** .£*- [a]**»i ^p? ^po/K^j 

.)ooi OlAJ (JLDOJ ^J^? OOJ ^P*/? J~/ **0*» ^ ^>° 'l^ ^•I! I** 001 

_., (ju-oj .Jju»oj oi^> [a]*Ju{ J-s^P! ^^^o, Ipo/fcoo .)^aj ^o. ^lo v U» 
^0 v? Po, .)I^^ jA^fcoj ^01 ^> v ? )?« .)K-V^ P"^? -« ^f ^6 Pot -ok>M 
)^o qiJM )^-V9^ )-o-**ooj -01 M ^o ^.j ^-Aoi Pt)| lloij ^-; po, .(~>o| ? ^i^a 
po)j J beu p ^0 0/ \j*xu ^zo 0/ oiiKd ^ff 0/ ^oiaiop ^bo .U01 o| )?ot o| .)K-V» ^*V»? 
o^M \K~**\**bJ> ^! -o, ^OJU^J4 K-^op o^^l? ^? )po/fcoo .J^ja^o ^j ? 
|^o^ o| IKjLaaa )K^^ ->-Jj ? ^^oo ^jaiLio ^»j ? po^jo JK-** ^^? ^^ ^^^! -o, 
ao,oM >-;o/ ? ^j (ju-oj .)^u> 0} (pa- oj )J^; 0} ^-^o jaI^j; o| .^po )pu><^ o/ 
^•0, .^ r ^ ^i ^»j v^o ^a ^ ^^; 001 vj? .^Jfc^ ^°^ V^ UXAAi0? ^° 
^ ? l*.* .0^ r fco» ^»jj po)j Iju-jo )^ r / ^f? J r ! ^aj ^ «-M ) r ^ t"M v? 

.)j)CL^ 0/ (Afto o| 

^x> Kn.9J ^opo JJUbo ILsUoj )la\V ^o .yoowpo s ^. ! ^W*>» jlojopo ^^ ^-^^a; 
.)is^ nO^aJ} voov^-u lo^ yooviV^ v ojoi ^; [o]m± .)U^fr.m\-> 000, ^oi^o .JlU»j 



ADDITIONAL SYRIAC MANUSCRIPTS *>i 

i^) ^*oi Joo, J^~ V oi^DJ, v oo^ ^^ )j*o.o vooup^ W**J ^? °«* x^*~* 

K *> cuxaj, J4oaj ^01 qaso, ^j p -o-oaj, W**J ^-Aot [ ]X- ^0 f^ ^ 
po yoo^^oX v ,^,no J^»/ v oo^ o^j; Jji* ^f o^l/ ? ^ yOi} «-Juf >^> 

^> J-.O .QA30I? ^O, w^» ^>?P0 <*** IbOoOj voJo^O |jl*| &> V^O. ^ U* J<** 

^ ^ ^01 .Jj^J j— JJJ voopc^ )J-^ (sic) vO^Ki JJ? ^oio-^^ y^o o^> ?J } ? ^ 
j-^j ^ ? Uoi -U* IcoM yoo^ ^a* ? ^o, laV v a*; ^0, y4 ^\ v?^ M-M 
Jj^j j>c^ Mlox>J^ )H^J ^5J v^ * °>- ^- J>01 r* -«^ soc#t*± ^ ppo ^ yoiP )^ 

J . i\ ., j>opo JK^po ^3 JJL-Ja*^ JUujo (at) )K^# )^»<^> ^ If-* V^*' 

o H o^ .m*> ? jjj^oo Uj« ? ^ ? 00* m (**) *-*4*! W x*-' rh ^ M ^^^' 

(Cetera desunt) (-*o3s >? ^ooi po/ .p>ot? -oso*, JL. 



LIST OF THE DATED AND UNDATED MANUSCRIPTS 

WRITTEN BEFORE 1798 



No. of MS. 1 Page. 

629 S. 74 

653 S. 91 

171 A. 22 



628 S. 
632 S. 

630 S. 
141 A. 

632 S. 

659 s. 
638 s. 

644 s. 
632 s. 

164 A. 

651 s. 

652 s. 
643 s. 

646 s. 

648 s. 
637 s. 

165 A. 

640 s. 

631 s. 
662 s. 
141 A. 

649 S. 
208 A. 

645 S. 
131 A. 

641 S. 

647 s. 
636 s. 

165 A. 

166 A. 



74 

75 

75 

9 

75 
94 

78 

87 
75 

19 

89 
89 

87 



78 

19 

85 
75 
95 

9 
89 

36 
87 

5 
86 

88 

77 

19 
20 



Date of MS. 

A.D. 

400-450 
450-500 

5th cent. 

(Greek) 

500 

500-530 

550 
6th cent. 

(Greek) 

600 

600 

630 

630 

643 

650 

(Syriac) 

650 

670 

700 

750 

750 

750 

770 

780 

780 

800 

800 

820 

800-830 

830 

830 

850 

850 

850 

850 

850 



Dated 

or 

Undated. 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 
Undated 
Undated 
Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Dated 

Undated 

Undated 
Undated 
Undated 
Undated 
Undated 
Undated 
Undated 
Undated 
Undated 
Undated 
Undated 
Undated 
Undated 
Undated 
Undated 
Undated 
Undated 
Undated 
Undated 
Undated 



No. of MS. 

167 A. 
142 A. 

231 A. 

232 A. 

168 A. 

169 A. 

634 S. 

204 A. 

170 A. 

233 A. 

144 A. 

627 S. 
642 s. 

134 A. 

239 A. 

234 A. 

633 s. 

635 s. 
650 S. 

205 A. 
121 A. 

135 A. 

235 A. 

236 A. 

237 A. 
244 A. 
229 A. 

145 A. 
659 s. 

206 A. 
124 A. 
141 A. 

146 A. 

240 A. 
658 S. 



Page. 
20 

9 
44 
45 
21 
21 
77 
35 
21 

45 
10 

73 

86 

6 

47 
46 
76 

77 

89 

35 

1 

7 
46 
46 
46 

50 
44 
11 

94 

36 

2 

9 
11 

48 

93 



Date of MS. 

A.D. 

850 

830-880 

83O-880 

850-880 

850-880 

880 

85O-9OO 

85O-9OO 

87O-9OO 

88O-9OO 

9th cent. 

(Greek) 

900 

900 

900 

928 

930 

900-950 

950 
950 
950 
950 
950 
950 
950 
950 
950 
950 
900-1000 

1000 
1000 
1000 
1000 
1000 
1000 
1028 



Dated 

or 

Undated. 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Dated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Dated 



1 A. indicates Arabic MS., and S. indicates Syriac MS. 



103 



104 



MINGANA COLLECTION 



No. of MS. 

654 s. 
656 s. 
147 A. 

171 A. 

241 A. 

242 A. 
259 A. 
637 S. 

655 s. 
661 S. 

172 A. 

207 A. 

208 A. 
238 A. 
125 A. 

136 A. 
660 S. 

180 A. 

209 A. 

639 s. 
653 s. 
657 S. 
175 A 

210 A. 
179 A. 

137 A. 

211 A. 

243 A. 

181 A. 

182 A. 

148 A. 

186 A. 

212 A. 

244 A. 

245 A. 

246 A. 
132 A. 

187 A. 
176 A. 

188 A. 
126 A. 

149 A. 

189 A. 

190 A. 

191 A. 

213 A. 
227 A. 
138 A. 







Dated 




Date of MS. 


or 


Page. 


A.D. 


Undated. 


92 


1050 


Undated 


92 


1050 


Undated 


11 


1050 


Undated 


22 


1050 


Undated 


48 


1050 


Undated 


48 


1050 


Undated 


56 


I050-II00 


Undated 


78 


1100 


Undated 


92 


1100 


Undated 


94 


IIOO 


Undated 


23 


IIOO 


Undated 


36 


IIOO 


Undated 


36 


IIOO 


Undated 


47 


IIOO 


Undated 


2 


IIOO 


Undated 


7 


IIOO 


Undated 


94 


1 140 


Undated 


27 


1150 


Undated 


37 


1 150 


Undated 


79 


1200 


Undated 


9i 


1200 


Undated 


92 


1200 


Undated 


24 


1200 


Undated 


37 


1200 


Undated 


26 


1215 


Undated 


7 


1215 


Undated 


38 


I2l6 


Dated 


48 


1221 


Dated 


27 


1250 


Undated 


27 


1250 


Undated 


12 


1280 


Undated 


29 


1300 


Undated 


38 


1300 


Undated 


50 


1300 


Undated 


50 


1300 


Undated 


5i 


1300 


Undated 


6 


1300 


Undated 


29 


1308 


Dated 


25 


1334 


Undated 


29 


1334 


Dated 


3 


1334 


Undated 


12 


1334 


Dated 


30 


1350 


Undated 


3i 


1350 


Undated 


3i 


1350 


Undated 


39 


1350 


Undated 


43 


1350 


Undated 


8 


1350 


Undated 



No. of MS. 
139 A. 

143 A. 

144 A. 
164 A. 

261 A. 

262 A. 
185 A 

192 A. 

214 A. 

215 A. 

247 A. 

248 A. 

249 A. 

250 A. 
127 A. 

150 A. 

263 A. 

264 A. 
268 A. 

265 A. 

266 A. 

173 A. 
177 A. 
183 A. 

193 A. 

194 A. 

195 A. 

216 A. 

217 A. 

251 A. 

252 A. 

151 A. 

152 A. 
228 A. 

267 A. 

174 A. 

196 A. 

197 A. 

198 A. 
206 A. 

218 A. 

219 A. 

220 A. 

253 A. 

122 A. 

123 A. 
128 A. 
140 A. 







Dated 




Date of MS. 


or 


age. 


A.D. 


Undated. 


8 


1350 


Undated 


10 


1350 


Undated 


10 


1350 


Undated 


19 


1350 


Undated 


58 


1350 


Undated 


58 


1388 


Dated 


28 


1400 


Undated 


32 


1400 


Undated 


39 


1400 


Undated 


39 


1400 


Undated 


51 


1400 


Undated 


52 


1400 


Undated 


53 


1400 


Undated 


53 


1400 


Undated 


3 


1400 


Undated 


12 


1400 


Undated 


58 


1400 


Undated 


58 


1400 


Undated 


59 


1400 


Undated 


59 


1446 


Dated 


59 


1446 


Dated 


23 


1450 


Undated 


25 


1450 


Undated 


28 


1450 


Undated 


32 


1450 


Undated 


32 


1450 


Undated 


33 


1450 


Undated 


39 


1450 


Undated 


40 


1450 


Undated 


53 


1450 


Undated 


54 


1450 


Undated 


13 


1450 


Undated 


13 


1470 


Dated 


43 


1495 


Dated 


59 


1496 


Dated 


24 


1500 


Undated 


33 


1500 


Undated 


33 


1500 


Undated 


33 


1500 


Undated 


36 


1500 


Undated 


40 


1500 


Undated 


4i 


1500 


Undated 


4i 


1500 


Undated 


54 


1500 


Undated 


1 


1500 


Undated 


2 


1500 


Undated 


3 


1500 


Undated 


8 


1500 


Undated 



LIST OF THE DATED AND UNDATED MANUSCRIPTS 



105 



No. of MS. 

153 A. 

154 A. 

155 A. 

156 A. 

157 A. 

269 A. 
228 A. 
184 A. 

199 A. 
221 A. 
230 A. 

254 A. 

255 A. 
133 A. 

270 A. 

271 A. 
129 A. 

200 A. 

223 A. 

224 A. 

225 A. 



Page. 

14 

14 
15 
15 
15 
60 

43 
28 

34 

4i 
44 
54 
54 

6 
60 
60 

3 
34 
42 
42 
42 



Date of MS. 

A.D. 

1500 
1500 
1500 
1500 
1500 

150° 

1529 

1550 

1550 

1550 

1550 

1550 

1550 

1550 

1550 

1550 

1580 

1600 

1600 

1600 

1600 



Dated 

or 

Undated. 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Dated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 



No. of MS. 
130 A. 

177 A. 

624 S. 

178 A. 

201 A. 

256 A. 

257 A. 
272 A. 
626 S. 

158 A 

202 A. 

159 A. 
623 S. 

625 S. 

258 A. 
226 A. 
260 A. 

160 A. 
222 A. 

161 A. 

162 A. 



Page. 

5 

25 
67 
25 
34 
55 
55 
61 

72 
15 
34 
17 
63 
70 

55 
43 
57 
17 

4i 

17 

18 



Date of MS. 

A.D. 

l600 

1 6l4 

1637 & l639 

1650 

1650 

1650 

1650 

1650 

l662 

1680 

1700 

1700 

1738 

1745 & 1746 

1749 

1750 

1750 

1750 

1770 

1786 

1794 



Dated 

or 

Undated. 

Undated 

Dated 

Dated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Dated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Dated 

Dated 

Dated 

Undated 

Undated 

Undated 

Dated 

Dated 

Dated 



CONCORDANCE OF NUMBERS OF CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANU- 
SCRIPTS IN VOLUMES II AND III OF CATALOGUE 



Shelf Cataloguei 
No. No. I 





i 


19 




2 


8 




3 


48 




4 


1 




5 


7 




6 


78 




7 


4 




8 


49 


(Copt. -Arab. 


i) 9 


24 




10 


3 




ii 


107 




12 


105 




13 


106 




14 


18 




15 


21 




i6b 


65 




zyb 


17 




18 


104 




19 


98 




20 


82 




21 


77 




22 


81 




23 


6 




24 


56 




25 


101 




26 


84 




27 


75 




28 


20 




29 


102 




30 


80 




3i 


83 




32 


69 




33 


70 




34 


52 




35 


28 




36 


114 




37 


74 



Shelf Catalogue 

No. No. 

38 50 

39 35 

40 68 

41 30 

42 37 

43 112 

44 39 

45 I20 

46 29 

47 15 

48 89 

49 66 

50 97 

51 90 

52 7i 

53 53 

54 79 

55 67 

56 9 

57 38 

58 16 

59 »> 

60 87 
(Copt.-Arab. 2) 61 22 

62 11 

63 12 

64 h 54 

65 14 

66 51 

67 41 

68 88 

69 115 

70 116 

71 45 

72 no 

73 & I0 3 
74* 2 3 

107 



Shelf < 


Catalogue 


No. 


No. 


75 


H3 


76 


III 


77 


55 


78 


72 


79 


40 


80 


46 


81 


58 


82 


47 


83 


44 


84 


93 


85 


96 


86 6 


59 


87 & 


92 


88 


95 


89 


25 


90 


86 


9i 


85 


92 


13 


93 


43 


94 


9i 


95 


62 


96 


32 


97 


34 


98 


73 


99 


117 


100 


57 


101 


42 


102 


118 


103 


5 


104 


60 


105 


94 


106 & 


27 


107 


31 


108 


109 


109 


99 


no 


100 


in 


108 



io8 



Shelf 
No. 



112 

113 

114 

115 
Il6 
117 
Il8 



119 
I20fe 
Add. 121 
(Copt.-Arab. 3) Add. 122 
Add. 123 
Add. 124 
Add. 125 
Add. 126 
Add. 127 
Add. 128 
Add. 129 
Add. 130 
Add. 131 
Add. 132 
Add. 133 
Add. 134 
Add. 135 
Add. 136 
Add. 137 
Add. 138 
Add. 139 
Add. 140 
Add. 141 
Add. 142 
Add. 143 
Add. 144 
Add. 145 
.Add. 146 
Add. 147 
Add. 148 
Add. 149 
Add. 150 
Add. 151 
Add. 152 
Add. 153 
Add. 154 
Add. 155 
Add. 156 
Add. 157 
Add. 158 
Add. 159 



Catalogue 
No. 

33 
36 
64 
61 

63 

26 

119 

2 
76 

158 
163 
144 
166 
171 

145 
136 
242 
207 
167 
147 
204 
180 
168 

259 
233 
131 
164 

234 
170 

134 
244 
239 
237 
141 
209 
232 
142 
231 

165 
169 
191 
208 
160 
124 

157 
199 

153 
264 



MINGANA COLLECTION 

Shelf Catalogue 

No. No. 

Add. 160 197 

Add 161 133 

Add. 162 200 

Add. 163 135 

Add. 164 192 

Add. 165 174 • 

Add. 166 186 

Add. 167 261 

Add. 168 150 

Add. 169 151 

Add. 170 215 

Add. 171 189 

Add. 172 248 

Add. 173 271 

Add. 174 251 

Add. 175 238 

Add. 176 219 

Add. 177 125 

Add. 178 267 

Add. 179 217 

Add. 180 146 

Add. 181 269 

Add. 182 265 

Add. 183 132 

Add. 184 216 

Add. 185 220 

Add. 186 162 

Add 187 194 

Add. 188 178 

Add. 189 172 

Add. 190 226 

Add. 191 224 

Add. 192 225 

Add. 193 206 

Add. 194 210 

Add. 195 236 

Add. 196 249 

Add. 197 126 

Add. 198 154 

Add 199 121 

Add. 200 235 

Add. 201 223 

Add. 202 195 

Add. 203 262 

Add. 204 229 

Add. 205 187 

Add. 206 173 

Add. 207 205 



Shelf Catalogue 

No. No. 

Add. 208 266 

Add. 209 221 

Add. 210 177 

Add. 211 122 

Add. 212 253 

Add 213 270 

Add. 214 211 

Add. 215 184 

Add. 216 268 

Add. 217 137 

Add. 218 214 

Add. 219 175 

Add. 220 138 

Add. 221 190 

Add. 222 127 

Add. 223 230 

Add. 224 185 

Add. 225 161 

Add 226 159 

Add. 227 179 

Add. 228 149 

Add. 229 130 

Add. 230 240 

Add. 231 181 

Add. 232 241 

Add. 233 139 

Add. 234 243 

Add. 235 148 

Add. 236 246 

Add. 237 182 

Add. 238 176 

Add. 239 263 

Add. 240 254 

Add. 241 140 

Add. 242 213 

Add. 243 193 

Add. 244 212 

Add. 245 250 

Add. 246 218 

Add. 247 227 

Add. 248 252 

Add 249 222 

Add. 250 196 

Add. 251 272 

Add. 252 202 

Add. 253 228 

Add. 254 156 

Add. 255 245 



CONCORDANCE OF NUMBERS OF CHRISTIAN ARABIC MANUSCRIPTS 109 



Shelf 


Catalogue 


Shelf 


Catalog 


No. 


No. 


No. 


No. 


Add. 256 


183 


Add. 262 


123 


Add. 257 


128 


Add. 263 


256 


Add. 258 


247 


Add. 264 


155 


Add. 259 


143 


Add 265 


258 


Add. 260 


203 


Add. 266 


257 


Add. 261 


260 


Add 267 


152 



Shelf 
No. 

Add. 268 

Add. 269 

Add. 270 

Add. 271 

Add. 272 



Catalogue 
No. 

255 
198 
201 
129 
188 



GENERAL INDEX 



GENERAL INDEX 



A 



'Abdallah b. Facll a. Fath al- 

Antaki, 8, 42. 
'Abdallah, son of Joseph Rumiyah, 

17- 
'Abd al-Masih of Mount Sinai, 52. 
'Abd ar-Rahman b. 'Abd al- 

Malik al-Hashimi, 29. 
Abib, 13. 

Abj ad-numbering, 60. 
Absalom, 5. 
Acta Martyrorum, by P. Bedjan, 

86. 
Acta Pilati, 9, 79-85. 
Adam, 88. 
Admonition, 92. 
Adonseus, 96. 

Adoration of the Cross, 65. 
Advices, 32, 39, 40. 
^Eacides of Epirus, 96. 
Aftimius al-Hamawi, Patriarch, 

15- 
Agathon, abbot, 37. 
Agathon, monk of Mount Sinai, 

49- 
'Ain Warqa, 72. 

Album de la Confririe Saint Mar on, 
by Joseph Kattar Ghanem, 
Beyrouth, 1903. 

Aleppo, 15, 17. 

Alexander, 82, 84. 

Alexander of Rome, 13. 

Alexandria, 12, 48, 75. 

All Saints, 63. 

Alms, 36. 

'Amman, village, 59. 

Amnion, 37. 

Ammon, abbot, 40. 

Anaxarchus, 96. 

Anastasius, emperor, 39. 
8 



Ancyra, 23. 

Anecdotes, 36, 45, 46, 48. 

Angels, 18, 21, 51, 63. 

Angora, 23. 

Animals, 89, 90, 91. 

Annas, 82. 

Annunciation of the Virgin, 63. 

Annunciation of Zacharias, 63. 

Antioch, 12, 30. 

Antiochus al-Ghalati, monk of 

Mount Athos, 26. 
Antiochus, monk of St. Saba, 23, 

25, 26. 
Anytus, 96. 
Aphiki, 82. 
Apocrypha, 9, 10. 
Apocrypha and Pseudo-epigrapha 

of the Old Testament, The, by 

R. H. Charles, 69, 70. 
Apocryphical New Testament, by 

M. R. James, 79. 
Apollo, Abbot, 50. 
Apollonius, 53. 
Apostate, 46. 
Apostles, 2, 21, 22, 35. 
Appearance of the angel to Joseph, 

63. 
April, 11. 
Arethas, 51. 
Ark, Noah's, 20. 
Arsenius, 37. 
Arsisius, 54. 
Artemis, 96. 
Ascension, 4, 66. 
Asclepicles, 83. 
Asclepius, 83. 

Assumption of the Virgin, The, 66. 
Astrology, 44, 56, 96. 
Astronomy, 44, 96. 
Athens, 51, 97. 
'Atiyah, son of Joseph Suwaili, 59. 

113 



'Atur, 28. 
Augury, 96. 
Aurelian, Emperor, 54. 
'Azai, 44. 



B. 



Badr b. a. Faraj b. a. Karam, 14. 

Baith Suphnayd, 86. 

Baptism, 22, 31, 36, 42. 

Barmahat, 13, 14. 

Barmudah, 13. 

Barsauma, Abbot, 14. 

Bashnas, 13. 

Bassel, Rene, 13. 

Bawunah, 13. 

Bedjan, P., 86. 

Beelzebub, 83. 

Beer, 91. 

Biblioth&que de MSS. Paul Sbalh, 

23, 29. 
Birth of St. John the Baptist, 53, 

63. 
Birth of the Virgin, 66. 
Bishop, 55. 
Bishop of Edessa, 52. 
Bishops, 22. 
Body, 43, 88. 

Body, real, of our Lord, 28. 
Book, last, of St. Clement, 32. 
Book of six mystical centuries, by 

Evagrius, 38. 
Book of Medicine, 32. 
Book of Thunder, 56. 
Bread, Eucharistic, 28. 
Breviary, Melchite, 92, 94. 
Brothers, three, 48. 
Budge, E. A. W., 86, Xy. 
Bull-burner, 96. 
Busenbaum, P. H., S.J., 71. 



ii4 



Csesarea in Cappadocia, 54. 

Caiaphas, 82. 

Cairo, 17. 

Camel, 91. 

Canons, ecclesiastical, 22. 

Canons of the Apostles, 22. 

Canons of the Council of Laodicea, 

22. 
Canons of the Councils, 73. 
Canticles, 15. 
Carpus, 42. 
Cartagena, 46, 47. 
Carthage, 45. 
Cases of conscience, 59. 
Catalogue des MSS. des auteurs 

Arabes Chretiens, par P. L. 

Cheikho, S.J., 26. 
Centuries, by Evagrius, 87. 
Charles, H. R., 70. 
Charles, R. H., 68. 
Cheikho, P. L., S.J., 26. 
Christ, 21. 

Christodolus, monk, 14. 
Christology, 33, 34- 
Church 20, 63. 
Church of our Lady of the Syrians, 

in Mount Sinai, 12, 31, 38, 52. 
Circumcision of our Lord, 64. 
Claudius, Emperor, 4. 
Clement of Rome, 10 
Cleombrotus, 96. 
Clothes, 40. 
Code, legal, 20. 

Coming, second, of our Lord, 31. 
Commandments, divine, 60. 
Commemorations, 2, 14. 
Commentary, by St. John Chrysos- 

tom, 32. 
Community, Jewish, of Cartagena, 

47- 
Conception of Mary, 63. 

Concubines, the four score, of the 

Song of Solomon, 24. 
Constantinople, 12, 53, 86. 
Contra Julianum, by Gregory 

Nazianzen, 96. 
Controversy between a Christian 

and a Muslim, 29. 



GENERAL INDEX 

Conversion of a Jew, 46, 47. 

Coptic Church, 2, 44. 

Coptic Uniate Church, 18. 

Corpus Christi, 66. 

Cosmas, Archbishop of Cairo, 60. 

Council of Laodicea, 22. 

Creation of animals, 89, 91. 

Creator, 91. 

Creon, 95. 

Cross, 19, 40, 44, 65, 66. 

Crucifixion, 11, 65. 

Cub, 90. 

Cursor, 83. 

Cyriacus, bishop of Bahnasa, 33, 

57- 

Cyril, bishop of Mount Sinai, 9. 



D. 

Dadyanus, King, 45. 

Dahdan, daughter of Arma', 51. 

Dalath, 75. 

Damaris, 51. 

Damascus, 15. 

Damietta, 72. 

Daniel, abbot, 52. 

Daniel Farani, abbot of St. Ar- 

senius, 28. 
Daniel, the prophet, 44, 56, 63. 
Datam, 82. 
Datha&, 82. 
Dathan, 82. 

Day of the Nativity, 27. 
Deacon, 22, 55. 
Dead, the, 64. 
Death of the Virgin, 20. 
Decius, emperor, 11. 
Decollation of John the Baptist, 

66. 
Demerits, 88. 
Descent of our Lord into Hades, 

34- 
Devils, 83. 
Dhu Nuwas, Jewish King of Naj- 

ran, 51. 
Didascalia, 34. 
Dinha, abbot, 76. 
Dioclitian, emperor, 11, 46. 
Dionysus, God, 96. 



Dioscorldes, 94. 
Discourse, 20, 56, 60. 
Discourse by St. Anastasius, 32, 52. 
Discourses by the monk Anti- 

ochus of St. Saba, 24. 
Discourse, Apocryphical, 20. 
Discourse by St. Athanasius., 52. 
Discourse by St. Basil of Caesarea, 

57- 
Discourse of Cyriacus, bishop of 

Bahnasa, 33, 57- 
Discourse, by the Abbot Daniel, 

52. 
Discourse by St. Ephrem, 31, 35, 

40, 50. 52. 
Discourse, by a Father, 21. 
Discourses, by Fathers of the 

Church, 27. 
Discourse, by Isaac of Nineveh, 

32. 
Discourse, by Abbot Isaiah, 52. 
Discourse by Jacob of Serug, 51, 

57- 
Discourse by St. John Chrysostom, 

53- 

Discourse, by Abbot Mark, 40. 

Discourse, parenetical, 32, 33. 
Discourse by Theophilus, 40. 
Dolitharius, bishop, 30. 
Dorotheus, 32. 
Dothael, 82. 
Dothaim, 82. 
Dreams, 96. 
Dress, 40. 
Duwaihi, 73. 



E 



Easter, 60. 

Economy of our Lord, 33. 

Egypt, 43- 

Elements, eucharistic, 31. 

Elias, 48. 

'Enanisho', 86, 87. 

The end of the world, 50. 

Epaminondas, 96. 

Ephrem, Bishop of Qara, 32. 

Ephrem Khatimi, 28. 

Epictetus, 96. 



GENERAL INDEX 



ii5 



Epiphany, 64. 

Epiphany of the Lord, 27. 

Ethic, 85. 

Etna, 96. 

Eucharist, 65. 

Eulogion of the Greek Mclchitc 

Church, 16. 
Eusebius, bishop, 46. 
Euthymius al-Hamawi, Patriarch, 

15- 
Eutychius, the head of the 

gaolers, 49. 
Evagrius, 38, 87. 
Evangelia Apocrypha, by C. 

Tischendorf, 79. 
Evangelists, 65. 
Eve of Easter Sunday, 2. 
Exegesis, 87, 89. 
Exhortations, 40, 46. 
Exploits of the archangel Gabriel, 

54- 



F 



Faith, 24. 

Faithful, 32, 46. 

Fasting, 30. 

Fathers, early, 19, 49. 

Fathers of the Church, 27, 28. 

Fathers of the Desert, 50, 54, 86. 

Fathers, Syrian, 88. 

Fear of the Lord, 36. 

Feast of the Annunciation, 55. 

February, 12 

Festival of the Cross, 66. 

Festivals, ecclesiastical, 2. 

Fish, 6. 

Flowers, 91. 

Forgiveness of sins, 59. 

Food, 40. 

The Forty Martyrs, 64. 



G. 



Gabriel, 53, 54, 57. 
Galen, 94. 
Gamaliel, 82. 
Garb, monastic, 31. 
Geomancy, 96. 



Geometry, 96. 

George al-Abrakh, 47. 

George, son of Michael Sabbagh, 

25- 
Georgian, 13. 

Gerasimus, Patriarch, 14. 

Germanus, bishop of Mount Sinai, 

3, 12, 25. 
Ghanem, Joseph Kattar, 73. 
Gigantes, 96. 
Glaucus, 49. 

Glorification of the angels, 32. 
Goats, 90. 
God, 21, 46. 
Goliath, 5. 
Good Friday, 2. 
Grammar, 61. 
Greek, 4. 
Greek Church, 11. 
Greek Melchites, 15, 16. 
Greek Orthodox Church, 1, 3, 6, 

14, 15, 17, 18. 
Greeks, 85. 
Gregory, son of Joseph I-Iablb, 

monk of Mount Sinai, 18. 



H 



Hagiography, 49, 54. 

Haikal, son of Nimr, 59. 

Hallal, son of Cyriacus Bassal, 58. 

Hama, 59. 

Hamza, 3. 

$anna Niyabizi, monk, 59. 

Harith b. Ka'b, 51. 

Harun as-Rashld, 52. 

Head of the pig, mountain, 93. 

Heaven, 20. 

Hebrew text of the Psalter, 5. 

Helena, empress, 44. 

Hell, 20. 

Heraclius, emperor, 46, 47. 

Hermes, rpLafidyiaTov, 43- 

Hermits, 30. 

Herod, king of Galilee, 81. 

Highwayman, 55. 

Hippocrates, 94. 

History, 37, 44-56. 



History of the Apostle Philip, 31, 

45. 52. 
History, Grseco-Roman, 95. 
History of holy woman, 53. 
History of St. Bakter, 55. 
History of St. Christophorus, 50. 
History of St. Philotheus, the 

martyr, 50. 
History of St. Theocloret, the 

prophet, 50. 
History of the town of Horns, 52. 
History, theological, 19-35. 
Holy Innocents, 63. 
Homiletic, 22. 
Homily, 7, 78, 91. 
Horns, 52. 
Horologion of the Greek Melchites, 

15- 
Horologion of the Greek Orthodox 

Church, 18. 
Horseman, 55. 
Horses, Thessalian, 97. 
Humility, 29. 
Hymns, Greek, 41. 



I. 



Ibn abi Husain, the Governor of 

Farrirah, 50. 
Ibrahim at-Tabarani, 29. 
Ibrahim, son of Moses Beda.ru, 42. 
Idolianus, 96. 
Ifriqlyah, 46. 
Ignatius, bishop, 29. 
Ilyas, monk of Mount Sinai, 38. 
Ilyas, son of Joseph, from Syria, 

42. 
Incarnation, holy, of God, 32. 
Index, '50. 
India, 97. 
Inheritance, 73. 
Introduction, by George, son of 

Michael $abbagh, to the work of 

Antiochus, monk of St. Saba, 

25- 
Isaac of Antioch, 42. 

Isaac of Nineveh, 32. 

Isaiah, abbot, 32, 40, 52. 

Izah, 8. 



n6 



GENERAL INDEX 



Jacob, head of the Jewish com- 
munity of Cartagena, 47. 

Jacob Intercisus, 53, 63. 

Jacob of Serug, 30, 31, 51, 52, 57, 
76, 88, 91, 92. 

Jacob, son of George Maqdisi, 17. 

Jairus, 82. 

Jalut, 5. 

James the Lame, abbot, 86. 

James, M. R., 79. 

Jariras, 55. 

Jarjura al-Fari, 42. 

Jerusalem, 12, 31. 

Jesus, 2, 3, 43, 46, 81, 82, 83, 84, 

85. 

Jews, 52, 81, 82, 83, 84,85. 
John, abbot of Mount Sinai, 28. 
John, bishop of Mount Sinai, 53. 
John, bishop of the monastery of 

Abbot John of Egypt, 28. 
John Climacus, 40, 41. 
John of Ladhiqiyah, 15. 
John, Maronite Patriarch, 72, 73 
John, the Physician, 50. 
John, priest, 76. 
John, son of Joseph, 93. 
Joseph, bishop of Mount Sinai, 31. 
Joseph Bu-Faisal Sarkis, priest, 

70. 
Joseph Caiaphas, high priest, 81, 

82. 
Joseph, a converted Jew, 47. 
Joseph, father of our Lord, 82. 
Joseph, Jew, 52. 

Joseph Khuri Dahdah 'Aquri, 73. 
Joseph, monk, 59. 
Joseph, son of John Adinaya, 67. 
Jovian, emperor, 47. 
Judas, 3, 13, 82. 
Judas, Rabbi, 44. 
Judgment, last, 31. 
Julian, the Apostate, 46, 96. 
Justus, monk of Mount Sinai, 60. 

K. 
Kaf, 3. 
Kasba, near Tripoli, 60. 



Kedar, 86. 
KepBaXeos, 96. 
^KepSaX-fj, 96. 
Khalil b. Ibrahim, 17. 
Kingdom of heaven, 20. 
Knowledge, 43. 
Kuma, Rabban, 78. 



Lacedaemonians, 96. 

Lady of the Harvest, Our, 66. 

Lament of the Virgin, 33. 

Lament of the Virgin, The, by 
Cyriacus of Bahnasa, 57. 

Latin, 4. 

Law, 40. 

Law, Jewish, 82. 

Laws, civil, 59. 

Laws, ecclesiastical of the Maron- 
ite Church, 72. 

Laws of Inheritance of the Byzan- 
tine emperors, 60. 

Lazarus, 65. 

Lebanon, 71, 72. 

Lectionary, 10. 

Lent, 2, 64. 

Letter of Abbot Moses, 40. 

Letter of Antiochus, monk of St. 
Saba, 23. 

Leuctra, 96. 

Levi, 82. 

Lexicon Syropalcestinum, by F. 
Schulthess, 78. 

Life of James the Lame, 86. 

Life, monastic, 37. 

Life of Jovian, 47. 

Life of Philotheus, the martyr, 52. 

Life of St. Alexius, 40. 

Life of St. Anatolius, 52. 

Life of St. Clement, disciple of 
St. Peter, 32. 

Life of St. Curius, 54. 

Life of St. Faustus, 55. 

Life of St. John, 54. 

Life of St. John the Baptist, 48. 

Life of St. Mammas, 54. 

Life of St. Marina, 49. 

Life of St. Yatnanus, 40. 



Lioness, 90. 

Literature, patristic, 50. 

Liturgy, 17. 

Liturgy of the Greek Orthodox 

Church, 12. 
Liturgy of the Maronite Church, 

72. 
Lives of the Fathers, 32. 
Lives of the Fathers of the Desert, 

50. 
Lives of martyrs, 54. 
Lives of saints, 37, 48, 50, 54, 78. 
Logic, 70. 

Longinus, the centurion, 11. 
Love of God, 21. 
Lucianus, priest, n. 
Lugman, 43. 



M. 

Ma'arrah, 59. 
Macarius, abbot, 37. 
Macarius Ibrahim, deacon, 19. 
Macarius, monk of Mount Sinai, 

17- 
Macarius, monk of Mount Sinai 

(not the same as 17), 41. 
Macedonia, 4. 
Magasis, 37. 
Magism, 96. 
Muthues, 37. 
Maimra, 88, 92. 
Majid Sarbasi, 29. 
Man, poor, 46. 

Mark of Tharmaqa, abbot, 40. 
Maronite Church, 72. 
Marriage, 22, 59, 73. 
Martin al-Hajj Peter, abbot, 67. 
Martinus Thabit, Maronite monk, 

71, 72. 
Mary, the Virgin, 63, 82. 
Mas'alahs, 49. 

Maskubi, Archimandrite, 17. 
Martyrdom, 30. 
Martyrdom of Abd al-Marih of 

Mount Sinai, 52. 
Martyrdom of live notables, 49. 
Martyrdom of Harithb. Ka'b, etc., 

5i- 



GENERAL INDEX 



117 



Martyrdom of Jacob Intercisus, 53. 

Martyrdom of nine men, 49. 

Martyrdom of St. Ablnus, 49. 

Martyrdom of St. Curius, 54. 

Martyrdom of St. George, 45. 

Martyrdom of St. Mammas, 54. 

Martyrdom of St. Mark, the evan- 
gelist, 52. 

Martyrdom of St. Natolius, 46. 

Martyrdom of Saints, 11. 

Martyrs, holy, 2, 18. 

Matthew, monk, 10. 

Medicine, 94. 

Melampus, 96. 

Melitus, 96. 

Men, good, 21. 

Menalius, 49. 

Menoeceus, 95. 

Menologion of the Greek Melchite 
Church, 16. 

Merchant, 46. 

Merits, 88. 

Messenger, 83. 

Metalepsis, 16. 

Michael, 57. 

Michael, bishop of Mount Sinai, 31, 

38- 
Michael George 'Azar, 52. 

Michael Sa'adah b. Autiin b. 

Sham'un Nasruni, bishop of 

Tripoli, 72, 73. 
Miracle on a sick girl, 47. 
Miracles, 20. 
Miracles of Palladius, 52. 
Miracles of St. Basil, 40. 
Miracles of the Virgin, 55. 
Miriam, sister of Moses, 94. 
Miscellanea, 56-61. 
Misori, 13. 
Mithras, 96. 
Monarch of Rome, 55. 
Monasticism, 39. 
Monk, 35, 37. 
Monk from whom a poor man 

asked alms, 52. 
Monks, holy, 2. 
Moon, 44. 

Morning Prayer, 18. 
Moses, abbot, 37, 40, 50. 
Moses, disciple of St. John, 54. 



Moses, monk of Kedar, 86. 
Moses, Patriarch, 58, 82. 
Mother of God, 63. 
Mount vSinai, 1, 3. 7> 10 > IT > I2 > 
13, 14, 17, 18, 21, 25, 26, 27, 28, 

29. 30. 3i» 32, 33. 37» 38, 39. 

40, 41, 43, 48, 49. 52, 53. 5 8 » 

59, 60, 78, 92, 95. 
Musa. al-Ajami, 44. 
Musa b. Nase-Allah, 28. 
Mushaf, 5. 
Mysticism, 19, 24, 25, 35"43, 5^. 

75, 78, 85, 87, 92, 89. 
Mythology, Gneco-Roman, 95. 



N 



Najran, 51. 

Name of Christ, 40. 

Napharoius, 32. 

Naphtali, 82. 

Narsai, 88. 

Nasi, 13. 

Nasr-Allah b. Sayid al-Abdi, 53. 

Nasrallah, son of Michael Bannan, 

18. 
Nativity, The, 78. 
Nativity of our Lord, 63. 
Necromancy, 96. 
Nephtalim, 82. 
Nero, emperor, 11. 
New Testament, 7, 21, 78, 88. 

Arabic version of the, 4. 

Gospels, 3, 4, 49, 75- 

Gospels, lectionary, 2, 5. 

Lectionary from the Gospels, 
Book of Acts and Pauline 
Epistles, according to the 
Melchite Church, 93. 

Matthew i. 1-17, 77. 

Matthew i. 1-20, Peshitta ver- 
sion, 76. 

Matthew i. 1, 78. 

Matthew v. 32, 4. 

Matthew viii, 4-37, 2. 

Matthew ix. 19-35. 3, 

Matthew xix. 9, 4. 

Mark xv. 2-31, 5. 

Luke i. 17, 48. 



New Testament {cant.) — 
Luke x. 30, 2. 
Luke xxiv. 53, 75. 
Gospel of St. John, 3. 
John v. 7, 3. 
John vi. 5-14, 2. 
John viii. 1, 4. 
John xix. 2, 3. 
Gospel of St. John, Commentary 

of John Chrysostom, 7, 8. 
Acts i. 6-16, 77. 
Acts iv. 36-v. 9, 77. 
Acts, x;ii. 17-xix. 29 ; xxi. 11- 

xxviii. 6, 73, 74. 
Acts xiii. 26-xiv. 16, Peshitta 

version, 77. 
Acts, xvii. 34, 51. 
Pauline Epistle, 49. 
Pauline Epistles, Commentary 

by Abdallah b. Fa^l a Fath 

al-Antaki, 8. 
Epistle to the Romans, critical 

introduction, 8. 
Romans ii. 28-x. 19, 73. 

1 Cor. xiv. 15, 6. 

2 Cor. ii. 8-iv. 18, 77. 
Epistles to the Galatians and 

Ephesians, Lessons, 3. 
Catholic Epistles, 73, 74. 
1 Peter i. 20-iv. 4, 73. 
1 John i. 2-v. 15, 73. 
1 John ii. 4-16, yj. 
James i. 2-v. 11, 73- 
Book of Revelation, Lectionary, 

63- 
Apocalypse of Peter, 10. 

Acts of Thomas, 9. 

The Brook of Cedron, 4. 

Book of the Rolls, 10. 

Crucifixion of our Lord, 79. 

Dives and Lazarus, 30. 

Entry of our Lord into the 

Temple, 64. 
Lord's Prayer, Commentary by 

John Chrysostom, 30. 
Passion of our Lord, Discourse 

by Cyriacus of Bahnasa, 57. 
Passion of our Lord, 92. 
The Pharisee and the publican, 

3i- 



u8 



GENERAL INDEX 



New Testament (cont.) — 

Qalementos, 10. 

Son, prodigal, 30. 

Trial of our Lord, 79. 

Virgins, ten, 30. 
Nicodemus, 81, 82. 
Nikon, 23, 26. 
Nisibin, 53. 
Noah, 7, 20. 
Novices, 40. 
Numerian, emperor, 53. 



O 



Obedience, 32. 

Obligations, 40. 

Octoechus of the Greek Church, 

17. 
Offspring, 90, 91. 

Old Testament, 1, 21. 

Old Testament Lectionary, 63. 

Old and New Testaments — 

Apocryphal Books, 24. 

Biblical commentary, extract, 
22. 

Biblical matter, 33. 

Biblical pericopes, 6, 17. 

Canonical Book, 24. 

Commentaries, 6, 7, 8, 9. 

Explanation, Biblical, by Jacob 
of Serug, 31. 

Lessons, 2. 
Old Testament — 

Arabic translation of the O.T., 5. 

Exodus xv. 1-5, 94. 

Numbers xxvi. 15-48, 91. 

1 Samuel xv. 12-20, Peshijta 
version, 75. 

Ezrai., 69. 

Ezra ii., 70. 

Book of the Prophets and other 
Books of the O.T., 67. 

Job, 1. 

Psalms, 18. 

Psalm i., ii., iii., 5. 

Psalm xviii. 9-50 ; xix. 1-9 ; 
xxxviii., xxxix., xlv., xlvi., 
xlvii., 6. 

Psalm cxliii. 8-12, 94. 



Old Testament (cont.) — 
Proverbs of Solomon, 1. 
Song of Solomon, 1. 
Song of Solomon, vi. 8, 24. 
Song of Solomon vi., 7, 24. 
Song of Solomon, 74. 
Isaiah, 67. 
Isaiah xxxi., 5, 7. 
Jeremiah, 67. 
Lamentations, 67. 
Ezekiel, 68. 
Daniel, 68, 69. 
Minor Prophets, 69. 
Hosea, 69. 
Joel, 69. 
Amos, 69. 
Obadiah, 69. 
Jonah, 69. 
Micah, 69. 
Nahum, 69. 
Habakkuk, 69. 
Zephaniah, 69. 
Haggai, 69. 
Zechariah, 69. 
Malachi, 69. 

Bel and the Dragon, 68, 69. 
Book of Baruch, son of Neriah, 

67, 68. 
Book of Susanna, 68. 
Ecclesiasticus, 1. 
Epistle of Jeremy, 68. 
in Macabees, iv. 15-v. 5 ; v., 

3i-v. 43. 74. 75- 
Wisdom of Solomon, 1. 
Abraham, Discourse by Jacob 

of Serug, 52. 
Abraham and Isaac, Discourse 

by Jacob of Serug, 57. 
Ark of Noah, 6, 7. 
Death of Moses, Discourse by 

Jacob of Serug, 52. 
Leah and Rachel, 88. 
Joseph, Patriarch, 52. 
Melchizedek, 30. 
Melchizedek, Discourse by St. 

Athanasius, 52. 
Queens, the threescore, of the 

Song of Solomon, 24. 
Sapiential Books, six, 1. 
What God told Moses, 32. 



Pachomius, abbot, 54, 87. 

Poetry, 88. 

Palestine, 4. 

Palimpsest, 7, 9, 19, 20, 22, 36, 

78, 91, 94. 
Palladius, 52. 
Palm Sunday, 94. 
IIav8eKT7]s, long, 23, 26. 
IJavSeKTTjs, short, 23, 25, 26. 
Papyri, 7. 
Paradise of Fathers, by 'EnanlshcV, 

86, 87. 
Passion of our Lord, 33. 
Passion Week, 65. 
Passover, Jewish, 60. 
Patrologia Orientalis, 79. 
Paul the Simple, 37. 
Peacock of the Angels, The, 55. 
Penitence, 57, 92. 
Pentecost, 66. 
Persecution of Decius, 11. 
Persecution of Nero, 11. 
Peter, bishop of Sebaste, 45. 
Phaedon, by Plato, 96. 
Phalaris of Sicily, 96. 
Philosophy, 43, 44. 
Physicians, Greek, 95. 
Pictures, 58. 

Pilate, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85. 
Pinon b. Ayyub Sahhar, 67. 
Pious, the, and the Just, 64. 
Pisseus, 96. 
Plato, 96. 
Poemen, 37. 
Poemen, abbot, 40. 
Possession, 35. 
Prayer-Books, 10-19. 
Prayer of Midnight, 18. 
Prayers, 11, 12, 14, 16, 17, 18, 32, 

34, 40, 46, 53, 59, 94. 
Preparation for the next world, 56. 
Prescriptions by Abbot Ammon, 

40. 
Presentation of the Virgin, 63. 
Priest who bought a Roman slave, 

52. 
Priests, 22, 64. 
Properties of herbs, medical, 94. 



GENERAL INDEX 



119 



Prophets, 21. 

Proteus, 96. 

Psalter, 5, 6, 76. 

Pseudo - Dionysius, the Areo- 

pagite, 51. 
Puhhame, 73, 75. 
Pythagoreans, 96. 



9 



Qara-Amed, 44. 

Question-answer, 27, 28, 37, 58. 
Qur'an, 5. 



R 



Rabbits, 90. 

Rahmani, I. E., 79. 

Raish, 75. 

Raphael, 57. 

Raqqah, 53. 

Renovation of the Church, 63. 

Repentance, 39. 

Resurrection, 20, 65. 

Revillout, E., 79. 

Revolt of the Slaves, 96. 

Rhetoric, 71. 

Riddles, 58. 

Ritual of the scapulary of the 

Virgin, 72. 
Rituals of Mithras, 96. 
Romans, 81. 
Rome, 4, 46. 
Romi, 82. 
Rosary, 67. 
Rose-trees, 91. 
Rubellio, 81. 
Rufus, 81, 94. 



Sabbath, 82. 

Safi abu Facla'il ibn 'Assal, 29. 

Safra, 72. 

Sa'id, son of Stephanus Mardan, 

48. 
St. *Abda, 66. 



St. Abinus, St. Ababmus, 49. 

St. Agathodorus, 11. 

St. Agathonica, 11. 

St. Alexius, 40. 

St. Anastasius, 32. 

St. Anatolius, 52. 

St. Antiochus the monk, 16. 

St. Antony, 64. 

St. Athanasius, 30, 52. 

St. Bakter, 55. 

St. Barbara, 63. 

St. Basil of Caesarea, 16, 27, 31, 

40, 45. 57- 
St. Basil the Great, 17. 
St. Carpus, 11, 27. 
St. Catherine, 59. 
St. Celsius, 11. 
St. Christophorns, 50. 
St. Clement, 32. 
St. Curius, 54. 
St. Dimet, 66. 
St. Elijah the Prophet, 66. 
St. Ephrem, 16, 27, 30, 31, 35, 

40. 50, 52, 92. 

St. Eunicius, 16. 

St. Eustachius, 24. 

St. Eustachius, the archimandrite 
of the monastery of Eutha- 
liptus, 23. 

St. Faustus, 55. 

St. George, 45, 58, 65. 

St. George of Hator monastery, 78. 

St. George in Jerusalem, mon- 
astery, 31. 

St. Gervasius, 11. 

St. Gregory Nazianzen, 27, 96. 

St. Jacob, 14. 

St. John the Baptist, 22, 48, 

^ 53, 63, 64, 66. 

St. John Chrysostom, 7, 8, 16, 27, 

30, 3i> 32, 34. 40. 53> 88. 
St. John of Damascus, 16. 
St. John the evangelist, 20, 54. 
St. Joseph, 63. 
St. Lazarus, 11. 
St. Luke, 4, 75. 
St. Mammas, 54. 
St. Marcian sanctuary, 48. 
St. Marina, 49. 
St. Mark the evangelist, 4, 52. 



St. Maron, 64. 

St. Matthew, 4. 

St. Modestus, 24. 

St. Moses, 28, 59. 

St. Moses, monastery in Sinai, 33. 

St. Nazarius, II. 

St. Nicholas, 63. 

St. Nilus, 27. 

St. Pantaleemon, monastery, 93. 

St. Papylus, 11. 

St. Paul, 6, 9, 11, 51, 66. 

St. Paul the Hermit, 16. 

St. Peter, 6, 11, 66. 

St. Philip, Apostle, 31, 45, 52. 

St. Philotheus, the martyr, 50. 

St. Protasius, II. 

St. Shamuni, 66. 

St. Simon the Recluse, 16. 

St. Simon the Theologian, 16. 

St. Sophronius of Jerusalem, 

Patriarch, 16. 
St. Stephen, 63. 
St. Thomas the Apostle, 66. 
St. Theodoret, the prophet, 50. 
St. Yatnanus, 40. 
Saints, various, 18. 
Salsalas Bafdrikas . . . al-Ndrfmi- 

yah, by Duwaihi, Beyrouth, 

1898, 73. 
Salutation of the four archangels, 

57. 

Salutations to the Virgin, 20. 

Samuel, priest, 66. 

Sanctification of the Church, 63. 

Sanhedrin of the Jews, 82, 85. 

Sapor II, 53. 

Saul, 5. 

Sayings of Fathers of the Desert, 

36. 
Sayings of John Climacus, 40. 
Sayings of the teachers, 40. 
Scala Parodist, by John Climacus, 

4*. 

Scapulary, 72. 

Scedasus, daughter of, 96. 

School of 'Am Warqa, 72. 

Schulthess, F., 78. 

Science, 44. 

Scipio Africanus, 96. 

Scythians, 96, 



120 



GENERAL INDEX 



Seleucia, 93. 

Seleucus, the carpenter, 49. 

Series, 82. 

Septuagint text of the Psalter, 5. 

Serapion, abbot, 86, 87. 

Sermons, 19, 20, 36. 

Sermons of John Chrysostom, 34. 

Service Books, 10-19. 

Shaikh, the, 37. 

Sheep, 90. 

Sibyl, 55. 

Sicily, 50. 

Significance of the Church, 31. 

Sim'an (Simon), bishop of Mount 

Sinai, 8, 26, 38, 49. 
Sim'un, son of Joseph, 47. 
Simawun, 61. 
Simon, 82. 

Simon, monk of Kedar, 86. 
Simon, son of Joseph, monk, 12. 
Simon the Syrian priest, 10. 
Sin, 40. 
Sinner, 55. 
Slavery, 96. 
Slaves, 59. 
Socrates, 96. 
Somne, 82. 
Son of God, 82. 
Soothsayers, 96. 
Sorcery, 96. 
Soul, 40, 43. 

Story of the Bishop of Edessa, 52. 
Story of the garments of our 

Lord, 32. 
Story of a highway robber, 39. 
Story of the Invention of the 

Holy Cross, 44. 
Story of a Jew called Joseph, 52. 
Story of the monk from whom a 

poor man asked alms, 52. 
Story of the priest who bought a 

Roman slave, 52. 
Story of the testimony of John 

the Physician, 50. 
Story of Theodore, a merchant, 52. 
Strategem, 96. 



Studio, Syriaca, by I. E. Rahmani, 

79- 
Sunday, 6th, 7th, and 8th after 

Pentecost, 2. 
Sunday of All Saints, 16. 
Sunday of the Pharisee and the 

Publican, 16. 
Suriel, 57. 
Synaxarium, 11, 
Synaxarium, Coptic-Arabic, 13. 
Synaxarium of the Greek Orthodox 

Church, 12. 
Syria, 17. 
Syriac text of the Psalter, 5. 



T. 



Tages, 96. 

Talut, 5. 

Telaginus, 96. 

Telmessus of Lycia, 96. 

Temptations, 87. 

Testimony, 50. 

Tests of manliness, 96. 

Theano, the Pythagorean, 96. 

Thelalius, the son of the carpenter, 

49- 
Theodore, 30, 54. 

Theodore, a merchant from Con- 
stantinople, 52. 

Theodore (Studita), 30. 

Theodosius, the monk, 30. 

Theodosius, the Younger, 86. 

Theology, 19-35, 39, 71, 85, 87, 89. 

Theophilus, 40. 

Thomas, priest, 94. 

Thorny bushes, 91. 

Tiberius Caesar, 81. 

Tischendorf, C, 79. 

Transfiguration, 32, 66. 

Translation of the body of the 
Patriarch Joseph, son of Jacob, 
52. 

Translation of the body of St. 
Jacob, 14. 



Translation of the body of St. 

Lazarus, 11. 
Treatise, Christological, 20. 
Treatise, by Dorotheus, 32. 
Trials, 96. 
Trisagion, 14. 
Tpoirdpia, 41. 
Twins, 90. 



'Unitha, 88. 



U. 



V. 



Vanity of the world, 56. 

Viper, 91. 

Virgin, 16, 18, 20, 21, 59, 63, 66, 

72. 
Virgin Mary, 55. 
Vision of Carpus, 42. 
Visit of St. Paul to Athens, 51. 
Visitation of the Virgin, 63. 
Vixen, 96. 

W. 

Waqf, 3, 9, 25, 26, 32, 38, 53, 58, 

72. 
Wearing-apparel of the priest, 31. 
Wednesday, 2. 
Works, good, 20. 



X. 



Xystus of Rome, 85. 



Z. 



Zabur, 5. 
Zacharias, 63. 
Zajaliyat, 34. 
Zodiac, 44. 
Zoology, 89. 



SUBJECT INDEX 

This Subject Index does not claim to be complete ; it is only intended to help the user in finding the 
material to which the General Index does not refer. In some cases it was necessary to index the same 
item twice. The Subject Index omits all names of persons, races, places, countries, etc., which are to be 
found in the General Index. 

The figures after the entries show the numbers of the Manuscripts. Titles of books are only mentioned 
when they are given by Dr. Mingana in transcription or translation. Syriac types are consequently avoided. 
The form of names, etc., is that which was chosen by Dr. Mingana. Titles are given in italics. 



Absolution, 207 A ; 345 D, I ; 

611 H. 
Accounts, 592. 
Accusations of the Jews against 

Christ, 4 F. 
Acta Pilati, 639. 
Acts and Canons of the Council of 

Chalcedon, 586 C. 
Acts and Canons of the Council of 

Constantinople, 586 E. 
Acts and Canons of the Council of 

Nicea, 271 O, P, Q, T ; 586 A. 
Acts and Canons of the Synod of 

Antioch, 586 C. 
Acts and Canons of the Synod of 

Gangra, 585 B. 
Acts and Canons, Synodical, 586, 

587- 
Acts and fourteen Canons of the 

Second Council of Neo-Caesarea 

(Carthage), 271 L. 
Acts of the Council of Ancyra in 

Galatia, 8 B. 
Acts of the Council of Antioch, 

271 N. 
Acts of the Council of Carthage, 

8 1. 
Act of the Council of Ephesus, 8 ii. 
Acts of the Second Council of 

Ephesus, 580 A, C, D, F. 
Acts of the Council of Gangra, 

271 M. 



Acts of the Council of Nicea, 8 A. 
Acts of Virtues, 109 C. 
Admonitions, 71 Z ; 138 A ; 

369 hh ; 402 B ; 504 E ; 

601 B ; 656. 
Admonitions, by Abraham Neth- 

praya, 403 Z ; 601 B. 
Admonitions, by Evagrius, 68 M. 
Adultery, 4 Q. 
Advices, 49 O ; 82 J ; 92 N ; 

182 I ; 190 F, G, ; 336 C ; 

369 dd, ee ; 600 J, L, M ; 601 B. 
Age, old, and youth, 465 I. 
Al-Ajurrumiyah, by as-$anhaji, 

226; 395. 
Alchemy, 360. 
Alms, 4 P ; 465 F ; 597 D. 
Alphabet (see also Letters), 113; 

424 D ; 113 E. 
Amulets, 316, 583. 
Analytica Pviora, by Aristotle, 

44 F. G- 

Anaphora, by Abraham Nafoshir- 

thana, 231 B. 
Anaphora, by Dionysius Barsalibi, 

231 A. 
Anathema, 180 B ; 184 M. 
Anathemas, by Cyril of Alexan- 

drien, 4 S ; 180 C. 
Anatomy, 138 aa ; 251 11 ; 365 H ; 

445 C. 

Anecdotes, 190 H ; 331 1) ; 369 J ; 

446 L ; 453 E ; 4(H) V ; 502 K ; 
620 A. 



Angels, 71 J; 100 A; 324; 

352 A; 476 A. 
Annunciation, 39 ; 77 K ; 

144 B ; 188 ; 403 R ; 450 A, 

B, C ; 545 B ; 607 K, L. 
Answer to heretics, 480 tt. 
Anti-Christ, 55 A ; 197 D ; 598 

C, D. 

Antiphonies of Severus of Antioch, 

translated from Greek into 

Syriac by Paul of Telia, 600 J. 
Apocalypse, 240 J. 
Apocryphical works, 441 A, D ; 

460 M. 
Apology of the Nestorian Faith, 

47» Y, aa. 
Apology of West Syrian Church, 

292 C. 
Apostles, twelve, 460 C. 
Apples made of six different 

metals, 514 N. 
Arabian Nights, 146 H, hh. 
Ark, Noah's, 4 ee ; 108 C. 
Armenian Language, 450 ; 520 C. 
Armonia, by Jacob bar Shikko of 

Bartille, 501 F. 
A rmour of Faith, by Basil Shim'un 

of Tut 'Abdlh, 116 ; 139 A; 

290 ; 608 B. 
Art, 75, 480 D. 
Ascension, 3 B ; 600 K, M. 
Ascent of the Mind, The, Abul- 

Ma'ani 'Aziz 1). Sabta, 79 B ; 

616 A. 



121 



122 



SUBJECT INDEX 



Ascent of the Mind, by Barhebraeus 
306 B. 

Asceticism, 97 I ; 101 B. 

Ash Wednesday, 611 A. 

Assumption, 5 D ; 48 D ; 114 C ; 
501 A. 

Astrology (see also Horoscope), 1 
A ; 45 N ; 170 A ; 191 ; 266 ; 
281 ; 311 ; 341 A, B, C ; 376 ; 
387 I ; 519 B ; 556 A ; 597 B. 

Astronomy, 71 J, R ; 96 D ; 161 
F, G, H ; 165 A, B, C ; 173 
191 B, C ; 211 ; 266 ; 306 B 
311 ; 480 dd ; 519 B ; 556 A 
559 D ; 581 C, D ; 597 B 
604 H. 

Attributes of God, 18 A ; 588 B. 

Ausar Raze, by Barhebraeus (ex- 
tracts), 38 D. 

Avoidance of hell, 182 D. 

Avoidance of sin, 464 C. 



B 



Balance of the Time, by J. E. 

Nieremberg, S.J., ill. 
Baptism, 4J; 4R; 4Y; 4aa; 

8 bb ; 8 11 ; n E ; 16 B ; 47 kk ; 

56 ; 55 A ; 155 B ; 170 A ; 

195 B ; 215 D ; 342 D ; 380 A ; 

566 B, C, D ; 587 H ; 604 J ; 

611 C. 
Basalike\ 102 D. 
Ba'utha, 28 C, D, E, F, I ; 130 I, 

J, K ; 149 G ; 214 K, L. 
Ba'watha, by St. Ephrem and 

by Jacob of Serug, 245. 
Beatitudes, 83 K, 284 B. 
Beginning of Words, by John of 

Phenek (bar Penkay6), 179. 
Beliefs, Christological, of the West 

Syrian Church, 95 D. 
Benediction, 611 D ; 604 R. 
Benedictions, 3 A. 
Betrayal, 403 H. 

Bible. See also Old Testament 
and New Testament. 

Book of Excerpts, probably by 
Philoxenus of Mebbug, 105 W. 



Bible — (cont.) 

Commentaries by Barhebraeus. 

see Storehouse of Sacraments 

t ox Horreum Mysteriorum. 
Commentary, by John Chrysos- 

tom, quotations, 4 Q; 8 kk ; 

69 ; 331 A, G ; 344 D ; 481 A ; 

5*3- 

Commentary on the Lessons of 

the East Syrian Church, 
216. 

Contradictory passages of the 
Old and New Testament, 
105 aa ; 480 ss. 

Explanation of Biblical ques- 
tions, 460 E, G, H. 

Explanation of words, 108 A ; 
206 C, D. 

Lessons, 163 B. 

Number of the Syriac transla- 
tions of the Bible and the 
history of each one of them, 
178 K. 

Number of words, 424 E. 

Prophecies concerning Christ 
and His Divinity, 174 D. 

Questions, six anonymous Bib- 
lical, 369 I. 

Questions, various, and answers, 
132 B. 

Quotations, Biblical, 79 D. 
Bird, The, by John bar Ma'dani, 

6 H ; 44 H ; 178 B ; 331 Q I 
392 F ; 446 S ; 471 E. 
Birth of John the Baptist, 450 D ; 

545 B. 
Blasphemy, 14. 
Blessing, 611 I, J. 
Body, 32 E ; 47 tt ; 105 W. 
Book of 'Abdlsho, by Isho' bar 

Ibrahim, 144 B. 
Book of the Bee, by Solomon of 

Basrah, 93. 
Book of the Beloved Mary, no A. 
Book of the Causes, 566 L. 
Book of the Causes of the Feasts, 

195. 
Book of Centuries, by Elijah of 
Anbar, 31 ; 51 U ; 165 A ; 
579 A ; 581 B. 



Book of Chapters, by Rabban 

Shim'un of Mar Isho', 18 A. 
Book of Confession (Mysterious 

Canon), 138 V. 
Book of the Councils, by Severus 

Ibn al-Mukaffa', see History of 

the Councils. 
Book of Definitions, by Michael 

Badhiika, 547 C. 
Book of the Dove, by Barhebraeus, 

164 A ; 189 C ; 190 E ; 234 F ; 

286 A ; 314 A ; 348 A ; 392 A. 
Book of Ethics, by Barhebraeus, 

156 A ; 158 A ; 273 ; 460 J ; 

467 A ; 468. 
Book of Excerpts, probably by 

Philoxenus of Mebbug, see Bible. 
Book of Faith and Unity, by 

Simon Redhipa, 544. 
Book of Governors, by Thomas of 

Marga, 47 X. 
Book of Hierotheus, edition and 

commentary upon, by Barhe- 
braeus, 99 ; 157. 
Book of Hours, of the East Syrian 

Uniats, 134 
Book of Illumination, by Peter (or 

Severus) al- Jamil, see al-Ishrdk. 
Book of the Interpreter, The, by 

Elijah of Nisibin, see Interpreter, 

The. 
Book of the Invocations to the 

Virgin, 359 B. 
Book of the Knowledge of Truth, 

581 A. 
Book of the Laughable Stories, by 

Barhebraeus, 150 A ; 550. 
Book of Life (Diptychs of the 

West Syrians, 3 I ; 172. 
Book of Lives of Saints, 449. 
Book of the Miracles of the Virgin 

Mary, 133 C. 
Book of Monks, 541 B. 
Book of the Monks, extracts, 

604 B. 
Book of Paradise of Eden, by 

'Abdlsho' of Nisibin, see 

Paradise of Eden. 
Book of the Pearl, by 'Abdlsho' of 

Nisibin, see Pearl. 



Book of Prayers for the West 

Syrians, 397. 
Book of Prayers of the West 

Syrian Uniats, 175, 205. 
Book of the Pupils, by Barhebraeus, 

see Pupils of the Eyes. 
Book of Questions, by St. Simon 

Cephas, or St. Peter, 604 F. 
Book of Rays, by Barhebrseus, 15 ; 

34 ; 324 ; 342 G ; 415 A ; 476 A. 
Book of the Roses of Paradise, 

Excerpt, 331 D. 
Book of Scholion, by Theodore bar 

Koni, 108 P. 
Book of Selections, 360. 
Book of the Sessions, see Old 

Testament. 
Book of the Seven Hours, 426. 
Book of Treasures, by Jacob of 

Bartilla, 100 A ; 349. 
Book of Treasures, by Job of 

Edessa, 559 D. 
Book of the Youth of the Mind, by 

Barhebrseus, 164 B. 
Book on the Faith, by Theodore 

of Mopsuestia, 561 A. 
Book on the Sacrament, by Theo- 
dore of Mopsuestia, 561 B. 
Botany, 338 C ; 599. 
Breviary, East Syrian, 78 B ; 488 

E ; 512 ; 542 A. 
Breviary, Melchite, 657 ; 659. 
Breviary, West Syrian, 245 ; 251 

M ; 305 ; 456 ; 578. 

Breviary, West Syrian Uniats, 

203, 205, 398. 
Burial, 503 B. 
Burial of Mary, 48 C. 
Burial of the Virgin, 39 K. 
Burial-service for the laymen in 

the West Syrian Church, 96 A. 



C 

Calendar, 1 C ; 46 A ; 51 B 
89 C; 106 E; 113 D; 186 D 
191 A, B ; 242 I ; 277 C, D 
398 B ; 404 G ; 424 G ; 521 J 
604 U. 



SUBJECT INDEX 

Calendar, ecclesiastical, by Dio- 
scorus of Alexandrien, 89 C. 

Candlestick of the Sanctuary 
(Menarath Kudhshe, or Founda- 
tion), by Barhebrseus, 27 ; 89 A ; 
161 M (Arabic translation) ; 
208 A ; 269 (Arabic transla- 
tion) ; 405 B ; 521 I ; 595. 

Canon, The Mysterious, see Book 
of Confession. 

Canons (including Canons of the 
Apostles and the Fathers), 
1 B; 4A; 8T-Z; 32 A; 35A; 
51 K ; 95 N ; 121 A, D, E, G, 
J, K ; 138 Q ; 240 H ; 271 ; 
295 M ; 299 F ; 345 A, B, C, 
F, H ; 476 B ; 479 B ; 522 A, 
B ; 547 E : 582 ; 586 ; 587 F ; 
611 C. 

Canons, Greek, of the West Syrian 
Church, 294 A- 

Canons, monastic, 47 bb, cc ; 
121 H, I ; 586 S, T. 

Canons of Clement of Rome, 
121 D, E; 271 D, F, G, I; 
453 A. 

Canons of Rabbula of Edessa, 8 S. 

Canons of the Council of Ancyra 
of Galatia, 271 K ; 453 A. 

Canons of the Council of Antioch, 
8 E ; 271 N ; 586 C. 

Canons of the Council of Chal- 
cedon, 8 K. 

Canons of the Council of Con- 
stantinople, 8 G ; 271 R, S ; 
586 E. 

Canons of the Council of Ephesus, 
8H. 

Canons of the Council of Gangra, 
8 D ; 271 M ; 586 B. 

Canons of the Council of Laodicea 
in Phrygia, 8 F ; 586 D. 

Canons of the Council of Neo- 
Caesarea (= Council of Carth- 
age), 8 C ; 271 L. 

Canons of the Council of Nicea, 
47K,W,k; 271 O, P, Q, R, T ; 
453 A; 564 R; 586 A. 

Canons of the School of Nisibin, 
47 dd ; 586 U. 



123 

Canons of the Synod of Laodicea, 

586 D. 
Canons, the ten, of Eusebius, 

105 A ; 105 J (Commentary 

by Dionysius Barsalibi) ; 124 C ; 

154 C ; 332 B ; 480 L, M. 
Canons, penitential, by Dionysius 

Barsalibi, 234 B, C, D ; 331 K ; 

345 D, G, H, I, J. 
Canons, Synodical, 138 Q ; 246 A ; 

453 A ; 503 B. 
Canticles (Canons, see also 
Hymns), 14 ; 51 S ; 72 ; 81 I 
92 H ; 229 ; 235 ; 236 B 
284 A, B ; 393 B ; 428 A, B 
438 A, D ; 507 A, B ; 529 G 

537- 
Capita Scientice, by Evagrius, 601 

N. 
Capita Scientice, by Evagrius, 

Commentary by Babai the 

Great, 569 B. 
Capita Scientice, by Rabban 

Aphnimaran, 108 N. 
Capita of Theory, 18 E. 
Catalogue, by 'Abdisho' of Nisibin 

("Catalogue of Ebedjesu"), 

36 B ; 212 C ; 568 B. 
Catechism, Chaldean, 519 E. 
Catechism, Roman Catholic 

(Uniats), 51 T ; 80 L ; 203 B, E 

259 B. 

Catechism, West Syrian, 155 I 

314 B. 

Categories of Aristotle, 84 B 
161 P ; 337 E ; 472 B (Com- 
mentary) ; 472 B ; 480 Q ; 481 
D, E ; 606 B, C (Commentary). 

Categories, Ten, by Isho'bokht of 
Rewardashir, 547 F. 

Catena Patram, 69. 

Cathismata of the West Syrian 
Church, 155 I ;• 241 A ; 31 1 B. 

Catholic Church, 139 A. 

Cause of Causes or Causa Caus- 
arum, 58 B ; 136 ; 211 ; 581 A ; 
588 A. 

Causes for the removal of ledious- 
ness, by Ishak ibn Jubair 
(Timothy Isaac of Am ed),268 A. 



124 



SUBJECT INDEX 



Cave of Treasures (by St. Ephrem ?) 
ii D ; 32 G ; 92 K ; in D 
133 A ; 258 C ; 355 A ; 460 O 
511 ; 567 B ; 588 A. 
Centuries, by Evagrius, 47 gg ; 

91 ; 99 ; 644. 
Certificate, 196. 
Chalice, 604 N, 0. 

Chariot of Intellectual Mysteries, 
The, by Basil Shim'un at 
Turani, 143 ; 276 ; 308 A. 

Charms, 77 A ; 341 A ; 583. 

Chastity, 494 B. 

Chemistry, 211 ; 581 A. 

Cherubs, 55 C ; 461 A ; 462 B. 

Chrism, Holy, 112 C ; 215 C ; 
225 N ; 546 B. 

Christology, 69 ; 105 C, T ; 255 A ; 
365 E ; 414 B ; 480 mm. 

Chronicle, anonymous, 47 Z ; 586 R. 

Chronicon Syriacon, by Barhe- 
braeus (extracts), 149 B. 

Chronology, 4 jj ; 11 G ; 42 B ; 
47 bbb, ccc ; 71 M ; 96 D ; 106 
A,B; 138Y; 145 C,D; 152 E 
161 L ; 173 ; 206 A ; 213 A 
292 A, B ; 318 A, B ; 321 C 
331 L ; 342 I ; 363 B ; 367 H 
372 C ; 376 ; 436 A ;■ 453 A 
460 F ; 470 ;• 496 C ; 520 D 
556 A, H ; 557 ; 589 A, B, C. 

Chronology, by 'Abdisho' of Nisi- 
bin, 212 F. 

Chronology, by Eusebius of 
Caesarea, 589 B. 

Church and Priesthood, 55 A. 

Church and the dove, 545 B. 

Circumcision of Our Lord, 450 I. 

Claims of the Pope of Rome, 
344 F, G. 

Climates, seven, 161 J ; 342 O. 

Colophon, 480 V. 

Coming of Christ, 88 F ; 481 B. 

Commandments, 29 C ; 82 I ; 
83 B ; 84 C ; 480 kk, nn, 00 ; 
523 A ; 600 K. 

Commemoration of Saints, 20 G, 

H ; 39 ; 195 I. 
Commentaries, see titles of separ- 
ate works. 



Commentary upon the Works of 
Pseudo-Diony sius, by Dionysius 
Barsalibi, 539. 

Commentary upon the work of 
Creation, 92 J. 

Commerce of Commerce, by Bar- 
hebraeus, 44 P ; 10 1 A ; 309 ; 

530. 
Communion, 142 A ; 186 A ; 

446 N; 466 E; 587 G. 
Compendium of Christian Perfec- 
tion, 168 A. 
Condolence, 465 J. 
Conduct, Christian, 240 I. 
Confession, 95 ; 127 A ; 138 A ; 

142 A ; 259 A ; 299 F J 304 ; 

377 E ; 403 L ; 445 G ; 446 H. 
Confession of Faith of the Nestori- 

ans, by 'Abdisho' of Nisibin, 

212 D. 
Confusion of tongues, 600 L. 
Conjugation of verbs, 238 A. 
Conscience, 386 B. 
Consecration of the Church, 39 O ; 

55 A ; 607 D, E. 
Consecration of water, 604 K. 
Construction of heaven and earth, 

445 D. 
Construction of the human body, 

610 B. 
Controversial Works, General, 4 Y ; 

56 ; 95 1 370 A ; 379 B ; 

406 A; 608 B. 
Controversial Works, by Dionysius 

Barsalibi, 4 gg ; 89 F, G, H ; 

215 G, H, I, J, L, M ; 295 B ; 

347; 369 0; 424; 549 K. 
Controversial Works, by George 

al-Halabi, 344. 
Controversial Works, by Peter of 

Melij, see al-Ishrdk. 
Controversy between Muslims and 

Shim'un of Tur 'Abdin, 190 A ; 

444 B. 
Conversion, 520 E. 
Correspondence, 4 D, E ; 47 M. 
Councils (including Synods, see 

also Acts and Canons), 4 T ; 

37 B ; 47 ; 95 I ; 120 F ; 121 

A, C, D. 



Council of Carthage, 586 F. 
Council of Chalcedon, 4 T, U ; 

69; 95 J; 344 E; 521 G; 

580 F. 
Council of Constantinople, 47 C, E, 

G ; 271 R ; 580 G. 
Council of Ephesus, 180 C ; 514 L ; 

580 F. 
Council of Galatia, 453 A. 
Council of Gangra, 37 C ; 47 D. 
Council of Nicea, 8 B ; 47 B ; 

255 A ; 273 R ;• 453 A ; 481 A ; 

507 B ; 561 A ; 563 N. 
Council of Sardica, 80. 
Council of Seleucia and Ctesiphon, 

8U. 
Country of darkness, 562 T. 
Cream of Sciences, by Barhebraeus, 

310 B ; 326. 
Cream of Wisdom, by Barhebraeus, 

23 ; 460 K (Quotations). 
Creation, 4 CC ; 9 C ; 55 A ; 

65 A, C; 67 B; 92 K ; 331 O ; 

392 H ; 462 B ; 511 ; 601 V ; 

652. 
Creed (see also Profession of Faith), 

Athanasian, 203 C, E. 
Creed, Nicene, 284 B ; 393 B ; 

423 I. 

Creed of the Council of Con- 
stantinople, 47 C. 

Cross, holy, 3 B ; 20 J ; 28 K ; 
130 E ; 215 B ; 314 E ; 453 D ; 
598 K, L ; 600 F, G. 

Cross, sign of, 161 B. 

Crucifixion, 140 ; 144 B ; 545 
K. 



D 



Dadyarestarsiydnus, 108 A. 

Day of Resurrection, 4 Z ; 218 A ; 
251 I ; 403 J. 

De (Bquilitteris, by Barhebraeus, 
187 B; 241 C; 307 B; 325 B ; 
336 B ; 373 B ; 424 A ; 472 A ; 
565 A. 

De (Bquilitteris, by Elijah of Nisi- 
bin, 340 G ; 434 A. 



De calesti Hierarchia, by Pseudo- 

Dionysius the Areopagite, 24 F ; 

167. 
De contemnendis mundi vanitatibus, 

by Didacus Stella, 233. 
De divinis Nominibus, by Pseudo- 

Dionysius the Areopagite, 24 F ; 

167. 
De ecclesiastica Hierarchia, by 

Pseudo - Dionysius the Areo- 
pagite, 24 F ; 167. 
De mystica Theologia, by Pseudo- 

Dionysius the Areopagite, 24 F ; 

167. 
De Unione, by Babai the Great, 

209 ; 569 A. 
Dead, the, 251 Y ; 338 G ; 409 

C, E. 
Death, 39 D ; 401 F ; 446 jj ; 

464 D, H, M ; 465 F ; 494 M ; 

521 C ; 588 F. 
Death and burial of the Virgin, 

560 E. 
Death of Alexander, 47 aaa. 
Death of the Apostles, 186 C. 
Death of John, the Evangelist, 

40 H. 
Death of the Virgin, 39 J ; 48 D. 
Death of the Virgin, 5 C, D, G. 
Deceitfulness of Satan, 225 U. 
Decollation of John the Baptist, 

450 L. 
Demon of blasphemy, 409 D. 
Demons, 22 Q, R ; 68 J, L ; 71 U ; 

232 G ; 324 ; 476 A. 
Descent of Our Lord into Hades, 

461 B. 
Destruction of Jerusalem, 514 A. 
Devotion, 584 C ; no A ; 138 A ; 

403 L; 438. 
Diagrams, astronomical and astro- 
logical, 597 B. 
Dialogues, The, by Jacob bar 
Shikko of Bartilla, 16 D ; 75 J 
340 B, D ; 371 ; 547 B. 
Diatessaron, 57 ; 586 0. 
Dictionary, Syriac-Arabic, 610 C. 
Dictionary, Syriac-Arabic, by 
Ilasan bar Bahlul, 62 ; 249 B ; 
396 A; 571. 



SUBJECT INDEX 

Dictionary, Syriac-Arabic, by Isho' 
bar 'AH, 474. 

Didascalia Apostolonim (The 
Teaching of the Twelve 
Apostles), 4 A ; 12 a ; 183 K 
(quotations) ; 271 ; 271 B, H ; 
453 A; 597 D. 

Dioceses of the West Syrian 
Church, enumeration, 161 O. 

Diptychs of the East Syrians, 

564 I- 

Diptychs of the West Syrian 

Church, 3 I ; 172. 
Disciples, Seventy, 460 C. 
Discourses (anonymous) , 295 C ; 

401 A ; 564 E. 
Discoure by Abbot Mark, 588 H. 
Discourse by Abbot Samuel, 232 B. 
Discourse by Ignatius of Cyprus, 

186 F. 
Discourse by John Chrysostom, 

186 A ; 401 C. 
Discourse on St. Mark, by Severius 

of Nasturah, 446 ee. 
Discourse on the Virgin, 73 B; 

562 B. 
Discourses, consolatory, 163 A. 
Discourses, Lenten, West Syrian, 

464; 465. 
Discussion between Nestorian 

Patriarch, Timothy I, and the 

Caliph Mahdi, 17 A. 
Discussion between a Muslim and 

a monk, 184 T. 
Discussion, public, 344 B, C, 
Divine Wisdom, by Barhebra:us, 

see Wisdom, Divine. 
Divinity of Christ, 144 A. 
Divisions, philosophical, 59 E. 
Divisions of prophecy, 424 D. 
Doctrine, Christian, 71 I. 
Doctrine, Christological, of the 

West Syrians, 460 B. 
Doctrines of the Church of Rome, 

116. 
Doctrine, outer, 518 B. 
Dog, 22 S. 

Dogmas, Christian, 95 N. 
Dots, grammatical, 424 B, C. 
Dreams, 225 P ; 559 F. 



125 

Duriktha of the Virgin, 567 F. 
Durrdsha, by Elijah of Anbar, 

see Book of Centuries. 
Duties of the confessor, 109 A. 
Dying, the, 466 A. 

E 

Ears of corn, 501 B, C. 
Easter Sunday, 545 E. 
Eclipse of the sun, 71 R. 
Economy of Christ, 84 C ; 4 8 ° !*• 
Economy, Divine, 20 J ; 57 ; 

67 G ; 78 K ; 130 E ; 152 A ; 

480 A; 505 B; 514 I J 522 D. 

Elegy, 369 Y. 

Elements, Eucharistic, 566 A. 
Elements, four, 559 E. 
Elevation of the See of Seleucia 
and Ctesiphon to the dignity 
of a Patriarchate, 70 B. 
Encyclopaedia, 211 ; 581 A. 
Encyclopaedia, theological, by Bar- 

hebrseus, see Book of Rays. 
End of the World, 26 J, K ; 32 D ; 

56 ; 324 ; 465 A, H ; 466 C, D, 

F, H, J ; 476 A ; 598 E. 
Engagement, 76. 
Enlightenment of Beginners, by 

Timothy Isaac of Amed (Ishak 

ibn Jubair), 74 A ; 160 ; 323 ; 

335 ; 342 K ; 479 A ; 498 A, _ 
Enumeration of countries in which 

each Apostle preached, 121 C. 
Entry of Alexander the Great into 

the " country of darkness," 

263 E; 562 T. 
Epiphany, 39 O ; 214 1). 
Epistles of Clement of Rome, 4 B ; 

480 gg, hh. 
Essence of God, 55 A. 
Establishment of the Church, 271 F. 
Eternity of the Father, 223 E. 
Eternity of the torments in Hell, 

108 F, G. 
Ethics, 70 B ; 156 A ; 158 A ; 

190 F, G, R ; 208 B ; 240 I ; 

250 A ; 273 E ; 289 B ; 353 ; 

373 C ; 460 J ; 4^7 A ; 468 ; 

488 A ; 493 A ; 559 G ; 566 N, Z. 



126 



SUBJECT INDEX 



Ethic, by Elijah of Nisibin, 220 F ; 

289 B ; 353- 
Eucharist, 4 Y, Z, aa ; 56 ; 

111E; 112 C; 144 B ; 215 E ; 

225 K ; 403 F ; 545 K ; 587 H. 
Eulogy, by Barhebraeus, 156 B, C. 
Eulogy of John the Baptist, 225 R. 
Eulogy of St. Basil, 184 J. 
Evangelisation of the world by 

the Apostles, 212 E. 
Evangelisation of Jews and 

pagans, 121 B. 
Events, Christological, 95 K. 
Events, historical, 588 E. 
Examination of conscience ac- 
cording to the Roman Church, 

297 C. 
Excerpts of the holy Fathers, 49. 
Exhortations, 35 A ; 49 I ; 86 S ; 

92 F, L ; 105 R ; 127 F ; 

223 H ; 225 I ; 410 A, D, H. 
Exhortation to Priesthood, by 

Ignatius of Antioch, 223 D ; 
• 225 I ; 591. 

Existence and nature of God, 65 A. 
Exorcism of the demons, 109 B. 
Exorcism, ritual of, 377 D. 
Explanation of theological and 

philosophical subjects, 108 N. 
Explanation of West Syrian Lit- 
urgy, 342 A. 
Extracts from John Chrysostom 

and Basil of Caesarea, 331 G. 
Extreme Unction, rite, 377 B. 



Fabric, The Metrical, by John 

bar Zu'bi, 50 A ; 84 C. 
Faith, 4 Y ; 37 C ; 79 C ; 105 U 

189 B; 190 J, N; 215 B 

225 T ; 481 G ; 514 S ; 520 B 

607 B. 
Faithfulness of a dog, 71 Q. 
Fasting, 82 G; 464 B, C ; 465 

A, K. 
Fast of the Virgin, 225 E. 
Feast of the Ascension, 195 J. 
Feast of the Epiphany, 195 C. 



Feast of the Nativity, 195 A. 
Feast of the Passover, 545 I. 
Feast of the Resurrection, 195 H. 
Feast of the Virgin, 195 B. 
Festival of the Nativity, 542 B. 
Festivals, 3 B ; 20 G ; 53 C ; 

130 D. 
Fight of the demons, 138. 
Fight of Our Lord with Satan, 188. 
Fire from heaven, 566 P. 
Firmament, 71 R. 
Flight into Egypt, 39 H. 
Flood, 55 A. 
Flower of Sciences, The, by Jacob 

Ketarblaya, 113 A ; 117 ; 

340 A. 
Forgiveness of sins, 16 A ; 548 D. 
Forms of Letters, 16 D. 
Foundation, by Barhebraeus, see 

Candlestick of the Sanctuary. 
Foundation of Schools, 547 G 
Foundations of the spiritual house 

of man, 251 P. 
Fraternity of St. Moses the 

Abbyssinian, 190 U, W. 
Freewill, 324 ; 476 A. 
Friday of Gold, 195 L. 
Function of angels, 92 K. 



Garb, monastic, 68 K. 

Garden of Pleasures, The, by " The 

interpreter of the Turks," 216. 
Garments of monks, 4 jj. 
Genealogies, by Mush6 Karkhaya, 

148 A. 
Genealogy, 163 P ; 342 J ; 480 W. 
Genealogy from Adam to Christ, 

308 B ; 496 C. 
Genealogy of Christ, 332 C, D, E ; 

480 R ; 540 B. 
Genuflexions, 564 0. 
Geography, 89 A, B ; 139 C ; 

161 H, J; 183 M; 342 ; 

445 D ; 480 bb. 
Geomany, 298 G. 
Gloria in excelsis, 83 J ; 155 G ; 

284 B ; 393 B ; 423 H. 



Glorification of God, 188. 

Gluttony, 284 D. 

Godhead, 464 A ; 601 V. 

Good and Evil, 87 B. 

Good Friday, 112 B. 

Grace, Divine, 47 rr ; 601 S. 

Grace of God, 330 F. 

Grammar, 2 ; 15 ; 29 G ; 38 B, 
G, I ; 47 X, ww, xx ; 71 aa ; 74 ; 
75 ; 80 C ; 89 I ; 92 F ; 94 A, 
B, D, E, F, G, H ; 104 ; 108 A, 
L. M. R ; 113 A ; 115 B ; 117 ; 
120 ; 160 ; 162 ; 169 A ; 218 B ; 
226 ; 238 A ; 241 B, C ; 249 A, 
C; 307 A, B; 323; 325; 327; 

335 ; 336 A, B ; 337 ; 339 B, 
C ; 340 A, B, C, D, E, F, G ; 
342 K ; 369 ii, jj ; 373 A, B ; 
395 ; 419 ; 424 A, B, C ; 472 A ; 
475 B ; 479 A ; 498 A ; 501 F, 
G, H, I, J, K, L ; 509 ; 510 ; 
538; 573; 614. 

Grammar, Metrical (Ma'alta), by 
Barhebrseus, 33 A; 169 A 
187 A ; 241 B ; 307 A ; 325 A 

336 A ; 373 A ; 424 A ; 472 A 
501 L; 565 A. 

Grammar, Prose (Simhe), by 

Barhebraeus, 15 ; 115 B ; 249 A ; 

327 ; 419 ; 501 G, J. 
Grammar, by Jacob of Edessa, 

104 B. 
Grammar, by John bar Zu'bi, 47 

xx ; 94 B ; 120 ; 510. 
Grammar, by Thomas the deacon 

and grammarian, 104 C. 
Grammatical Treatise, by Elijah of 

Nisibin, 94 A. 
Grammatical Treatises, by Jacob 

of Edessa, 104 A ; 424 B. 
Greatness of the Cross, 604 C. 



H 



Hardships of strangers, 494 C. 
Harklean Version, 10 ; 16 D ; 42 ; 

105 N, Q ; 113 A ; 124 A, D ; 

176 B ; 339 D ; 358 ; 362 ; 

480 M, T, Z ; 497 ; 525. 



SUBJECT INDEX 



127 



Heaven, 4 K ; 232 A ; 466 D, J ; 

494 M. 
Hell, 232 A ; 466 D, J ; 494. 
Heresies, 50 B. 
Heresy of Eutyches, 47 I. 
Heretics, 4 T ; 47 T ; 67 C. 
Hexcemeron, 65 A ; 133 A ; 150 C ; 

197 A ; 258 A, B ; 268 C. 
Hierarchies of the Angels, 475 C. 
Hierarchy, Celestial, 56, 539. 
Hierarchy, Ecclesiastical, 56, 

539- 
Hierarchy of the Angels, by Mushe 

bar Kephad, 9 D. 

History of persons, e.g. saints, 
bishops, etc. See General Index 
of the single volumes, s.v. 
History and Story. 

History, 7 B. 

History, Graeco-Roman, 662. 

History, natural, 101 A ; 559 D - 

History of the Apostles and dis- 
ciples of Christ, by Eusebius of 
Caesarea, 108 I ; 148 E ; 540 B. 

History of the Confessors in Pal- 
estine, by Eusebius of Csesarea 
(extracts), 150 E. 

History of the Councils, by Severus 
Ibn al-Mukaffa', 95 M ; 174 C ; 
370 B ; 399 C ; 457 B ; 514 M. 

History of the Councils, 4 T ; 
95 I ; 180 A ; 184 ; 514 K ; 
580 H. 

History of the East Syrian Church, 
71 G. 

History, the Ecclesiastical, by Bar- 
hebraeus, 61 A; 71 G (Quota- 
tions) ; 174 E (Appendix by his 
brother Barsauma), 192 A, B ; 

585 A. 

History of the Egyptian Fathers 
of the Desert (abridged), by Pal- 
ladius, and commentary upon 
it, by Philoxenus of Mebberg, 
174 E ; fourth part only, 370 C. 

History of the Elevation of the 
See of Seleucia and Ctesiphon, 
etc., 70 B ; 441 E ; 586 I. 

History of the Indian Mission, 
n H. 



History of the Jews, 92 K ; 441 A ; 

5xi- 

History of the Martyred Prophets 

and Apostles, by Epiphanius, 
424 F. 
History of the principal person- 
ages, 531 A. 
History of Rome, by Diodes 

Peparethius, 71 O ; 369 K. 
History of St. Macarius, by Abbot 

Serapion, 21 N. 
History of the world, 70 A. 
Homilies (anonymous), 82 D, G ; 

88 A ; 95 T ; no C ; 127 C ; 

250 ; 367 I ; 461 B. 
Homilies of Fathers, Saints, etc., 

see General Index of the single 

volumes s.v. of the author. 
Homonyms, 131 E. 
Horologium of the Melchite Church, 

618. 
Horoscope, 43 ; 77 N ; 170 A, B ; 

341 A, B ; 376 ; 381 ; 436 B ; 

444 A. 
Horreum Mysteriorum, by Bar- 

hebraeus, see Storehouse of Sacra- 
ments. 
Horticulture, 599. 
Host, consecrated, 225 A. 
Hours, propitious and unpropi- 

tious, 460 D. 
House of Treasure, 565 B. 
Hudddye, by Barhebrseus, see 

Nomocanon. 
Ifudhra, 512. 
Humility, 49 F. 
Humours of the body, 594 C. 
Hussaya of the ten virgins, 268 D. 
Hussaye\ 39 N ; 515 A ; 534 F ; 

607 A. 
Hussaye - of the West Syrian 
' Church, 39 A ; 183 J ; 414 E. 
Huttama, 298 G ; 338 F ; 443 A ; 

496 B ; 515 Q- t 
Hydrophobia, canine, 559 C. 
Hymns, 51 D ; 73 F; 80 A 
82 C; 115 A; 127 B; 169 C 
184 A, I ; 207 C ; 251 B, V 

260 A ; 293 B ; 387 G ; 413 C 

514 C ; 520 C ; 567 F. 



I 



Ignorance, 480 C. 
'Hal li-daf al-malal, by Ishak ibn 
Jubair (Timothy Isaac of Amed), 
see Causes for the removal of 
tediousness. 
Illumination, by Peter of Melij (or 
Severus) al- Jamil, see al-Ishrdk. 

Impediments to Marriage, 567 E ; 
586 bb. 

Incarnation, 50 A ; 100 A ; 105 G 
140 ; 161 B ; 209 ; 223 ; 324 
344 D ; 414 B ; 449 E ; 476 A 
480 A, W; 481 A; 518 C 
544 ; 549 I ; 569 A ; 607 B. 

Incomprehensibility of God, 71 N ; 
480 E. 

Indulgence, no E, F. 

Inheritance, 586 bb ; 587 J, K, L. 

Ink, 77 B ; 314 C ; 466 N. 

Intercourse, carnal, 514 0. 

Interpreter, The, by Elijah of 
Nisibin, 95 T ; 340 F ; 434 A ; 
469. 

Invention of the Holy Cross, 67 F. 

Invocations, 175 E ; 176 D, E, F. 

Isagoge, by Barhebraeus, 44 A. 

Isagoge, and Commentary upon, 
by Joseph II, Patriarch, 433 
B, C. 

Isagoge, by Porphry, 84 A ; 606 A. 

Isagoge, by Porphry, and Com- 
mentary by Patriarch Joseph 
II of Tell-Kaiphe\ 433 B, C. 

al-Ishrdk, by Peter (or Severus) 
al- Jamil of Melij, 32 B ; 95 G, 
K, L; 174 A; 370 A ; 399 A; 
457 A. 

Islam, 50 C ; 89 G ; 215 G ; 347 A ; 

431 B. 
'Itre, 39 A. 



Judgment, last, 26 A ; 251 I ; 

464 H ; 466 C ; 601 V. 
Jurisprudence, 47 ii, jj. 
Justification, 604 K. 



128 



SUBJECT INDEX 



K 

Kale, 163 C ; 184 C ; 251 M ; 
291. A ; 389 A ; 413 A ; 421 A. 

Kali! ah wa-Dimnah, Arabic trans- 
lation by Ibn al-Mukaffa', 127 J. 

Kanone, 389 A ; 564 T. 

Karuzwatha, 25 ; 428 C ; 604 J. 

Kasidah, 438 H. 

Katholikat, 236 B ; 251 T, R ; 
413 A ; 448 B, C ; 454- 

Kaume, 417 B ; 529 H. 

Kinatha, 16 C. 

Kiryane, 421 A. 

Knowledge, 480 C. 

Kukliyune, 106 E. 

Kullasa, 242 A, B ; 251 D, E, F ; 
289 A ; 372 E ; 387 A, D, F, 
G; 501 H, I, J. 



L 

Lack of faith, 26 E. 

Lack of rain, 600 N, 0. 

Ladder of Christ, The (on the 

Trisagion), 95 B. 
Lamb and unleavened bread, 4 Y. 
Lament of the Virgin at the 

Crucifixion of her Son, 297 A. 
Languages, written and spoken, 

108 D. 
Lapsi, Treatise on the, by Peter of 

Alexandria, 8 M. 
Latrocinium Ephesinum, Acts of, 

580 A. 
Laughable Stories, by Barhebraeus, 

see Book of Laughable Stories. 
Law, civil, 47 ii ; 587 B, C, D, E. 
Law, ecclesiastical, 47 jj ; 587 A. 
Law of inheritance, 586 bb ; 587 

J, K, L. 
Laws, ecclesiastical, of the Maron- 

ite Church, 626. 
Learning, 49 Y ; 393 C. 
Leaven, holy, 213 B.' 
Lectionaries, 105 B ; 106 G ; 127 

A ; 227 ; 302 ; 331 C ; 358 ; 

391 C ; 442 ; 506 ; 516 ; 537 
Lent, 47 yy ; 82 D ; 96 C ; 

144 B ; 195 D, E. 



Letter of Aba I, the Catholicos, 
47 if. 

Letter of Abraham bar Dashandad, 
601 C. 

Letter of Andrew of Samosata, 
586 N. 

Letter of Athanasius of Alex- 
andria, 8 P. 

Letter of Athanasius, Patriarch 
of Antiochia, 8 gg ; 184 P. 

Letter of Atticus of Constantin- 
ople, 586 M. 

Letter of Barhebraeus, 365 E, F ; 
471 C. 

Letters of Basil of Caesarea, 8 Q. 

Letter of Clement of Rome, see 
Epistles of Clement of Rome. 

Letter of Constantine, the Em- 
peror, 47 A, T, U. 

Letter of Constantine of Laodicea, 
8Y. 

Letter of the Council of Con- 
stantinople, 47 G. 

Letters of Cyril of Alexandria, 
8 hh ; 255 B ; 406 B. 

Letters of David bar Paulos, 
29 A, C, F, G, J, L. 

Letter of Dionysius, the Areo- 
pagite, 4 H ; 24 G ; 461 E ; 539 
(with the commentary of Dio- 
nysius Barsallbi). 

Letters of Dionysius Barsalibi, 

152 J- 
Letter of Dioscorus of Alexandria, 

580 B. 
Letter of Ephrem of Elam, 587 G. 
Letter of Eusebius of Caesarea, 

105 I ; 124 B ; 332 A ; 431 A ; 

480 J ; 579 D. 
Letters of Evagrius, 68 G. 
Letter of the Fathers of the 

Council of Constantinople, 47 E. 
Letter of the Fathers of the Synod 

of Gangra, 47 D. 
Letter of Gregory of Cyprus, 605 A. 
Letter of Gregory of Nyssa, 8 R. 
Letters of Henanisho' I, Patriarch, 

47 hh; 586 W. 
Letter of Ignatus of Antioch, 8 L. 
Letter of Isho' bar Nun, 587 H. 



Letter of Isho' Yahb II, the 

Patriarch, 47 nn ; 586 L. 
Letter of Jacob bar Shikko of 

Bartilla, 100 B, C. 
Letters of Jacob of Edessa, 4 0, R ; 

104 A. 
Letter of Jacob of Serug, 4 ; 

49 B, G ; 100 B, C ; 331 F, 

H, I ; 410 C ; 588 P. 
Letter of James, bishop of Jeru- 
salem, 4 C. 
Letter of John, the Seer of the 

Thebaid, 588 L, P. 
Letter of John bar Zu 'bi, 557. 
Letter of Joseph Hazzaya, 601 F. 
Letters of Khidr, son of al- 

Makdasi Hormizd, 246 B. 
Letter of Leo, bishop of Rome, 

47 I ; 69 ; 586 H. 
Letter of Marutha of Miparkat, 47 J. 
Letter of the Monophysite bishops 

against Julian of Halicarnassus, 

215 K. 
Letter of Nestorius to Cyril of 

Alexandria, 178 J. 
Letter of our Father Peter, head 

of the Apostles, 271 I. 
Letter of Philoxenus of Mebbug, 

71 H ; 480 kk. 
Letter of Pontius Pilate, 47 0. 
Letter of Publius, governor of 

Judea, 47 N. 
Letter of Queen Helen, 47 T. 
Letter of St. Antony the Great, 

605 B. 
Letters of St. Eulonius, 410 E. 
Letters of Severus of Antioch, 

405 C ; 580 E. 
Letters, Synodical, of Abu I, 

Patriarch, 586 K. 
Letters, Synodical, of Damasus 

of Rome, 47 F, R ; 586 E. 
Letters of Theodore bar Wahbun, 

4 M, N ; 37 »• 
Letter of the Emperors Theo- 

dosius and Valentinian, 47 H, S. 
Letters of Timothy I, Patriarch, 

47 mm ; 587 F. 
Letter of the Western bishops, 

586 I. 



SUBJECT INDEX 



129 



Letter of the Western Fathers to 

the Christians of the East, 47 L. 
Letter of the West Syrian com- 
munity at Mosul, 154 A. 
Letter containing history of Nes- 

torius, 586 P. 
Letters from heaven, 35 G ; 48 I 

80 B ; 138 G ; 141 B ; 176 

184 R ; 225 B ; 232 H ; 240 A 

352 N ; 368 D ; 401 E ; 446 C, 

X ; 529 E ; 567 D. 
Letters, 475 B. 

Letters of the alphabet, 420 D. 
Letters, Greek, 29 K ; 43 E. 
Letters, Indian, 113 E ; 148 F ; 

420 G. 
Letters, quiescent, 47 xx. 
Letters, Syrian, 337 B, D. 
Lexicography, 2 B ; 44 D ; 51 I, 

L ; 80 C ; 108 A, L, M, R ; 131 

B, D, E, F; 204; 339 D ; 

340 A, F ; 342 F ; 396 ; 420 A, 

B, I ; 424 E ; 434 A ; 469 ; 

475 A ; 478 A ; 480 Q ; 538 ; 

553 J 57i ; 579 B ; 610 C ; 614. 
Lexicon, Syriac- Arabic, by Hasan 

bar Bahlul, see Dictionary. 
Lexicon, Syriac-Arabic, by Shim'un 

of Tur 'Abdin, 496 B. 
A770T/31/07 avvohos, 580 A. 
Life of the monk Abraham Kash- 

kraya, 252 D. 
Life of Alexander the Great, 440. 
Life of Abbot Arsenius, King of 

Egypt, 85 C ; 593 C. 
Life of Barsauma of Nisibin, 

365 D. 
Life of Christ, West Syrian, 520 D. 
Life of Abbot Elijah, 577 M. 
Lives of the Fathers of the desert, 

see Paradise of Monks. 
Life of Gaddai of Palestine, 577 K. 
Life of the Monk Rabban Hormizd, 

by Rabban Shim'un, 61 A. 
Life of Rabban Joseph Busndya, 

by John bar Kaldun, 66. 
Life of Abbot Karas, 21 E ; 133 F ; 

138 H ; 190 K ; 446 J. 
Life of Mar Jacob, called al- 

a'sam, 22 E. 



Life of Mark of Mount Tarmak, 

22 J ; 85 J ; 404 X ; 441 E ; 

532 B ; 562 aa ; 593 J. 
Lives of the Martyrs of Amed, 

22 A. 
Life of the forty martyrs of 

Sebaste, 138 L ; 146 Q ; 449 C. 
Life of two monks, 71 C. 
Life of Abbot Moses the Ethopian, 

608 A. 
Life of an old saint, 71 B. 
Life of Abbot Samuel of Kartamin, 

528. 
Life of King Zeno, 138 M ; 146 11 ; 

352 F. 
Lives of Saints, 61 A, B, C ; 85 ; 

252 ; 534 B (index) ; 593. 
Life of St. Abai, 39 E ; 577 C. 
Life of St. Aha, 502 C. 
Life of St. Alexius, 138 P ; 146 jj ; 

263 C ; 352 E ; 403 D ; 445 E. 
Life of St. Archelides, 146 gg; 

225 S ; 263 L ; 403 B. 
Life of St. Armenius, 449 D. 
Lives of SS. Barbara and Juliana, 

39 F; 146 U. 
Life of St. Barsauma, 230. 
Lives of SS. Behnam and Sarah, 

22 B, D ; 146 M ; 367 G ; 449 B ; 

598 o. 

Lives of SS. Cosmas and Damian, 

22 B ; 240 C ; 367 E ; 535 A. 
Lives of St. Cyriacus and Julitta, 

88 B ; 146 L ; 367 C. 
Life of St. Daniel the Physician, 

85 A ; 593 A, 
Life of St. Elias al-Asbati, 446 ff. 
Life of St. Esythius, 22 M. 
Life of St. Eugenia, 146 pp ; 200 D. 
Life of St. Eugenius, 166 ; 200 D. 
Life of St. Eustathius, 577 L. 
Life of St. George, 85 B ; 237 B ; 

263 D ; 352 C ; 446 A ; 562 R ; 

593 B. 
Life of St. Hilaria, 138 M ; 146 11 ; 

240 E ; 352 F ; 369 00 ; 446 B ; 

534 E. 
Life of St. Jacob, 263 A, K. 
Life of St. Jacob the Lame, 

577 J- 



Life of St. Jacob the Recluse, 

252 E. 
Life of St. John the Baptist, 22 C ; 

183 E ; 367 F ; 369 nn. 
Life of St. John Calybita, 85 D ; 

593 D. 
Life of St. John of the " Golden 

Gospel," 22 P ; 146 mm ; 263 F ; 

352 O ; 355 C ; 369 nn ; 403 C ; 
. 593 D. 

Life of St. John Dailomaya, 543 C. 
Life of St. John Chrysostom,482 B. 
Life of St. John the Egyptian, 

502 B. 
Life of St. John of Kephenna, 

71 cc. 
Life of St. Macarius, 176 M. 
Life of St. Malke, 85 N ; 200 C ; 

593 N. 
Life of St. Maria, 532 A. 
Life of St. Marinus, 218 C ; 556 B. 
Life of St. Matthew, 85 K ; 534 C ; 

593 K. 
Life of St. Matthew, the Hermit, 

449 A ; 534 C. 
Lives of SS. Maximus and Domitius, 

71 E; 577 A. 
Life of St. Michael, the Monk, 

257 c 

Life of St. Onesima, 85 E ; 200 A ; 

593 E. 
Lives of SS. Symmachus, Hanna 

and Isaiah of Aleppo, 71 A. 
Life of St. Taberon, 138 E. 
Life of St. Thomas, the Apostle, 

543 A. 
Lives of SS. Thomas, Stephen and 

Zotan, 577 B. 
Life of the Virgin, 48 A, G ; 122 A ; 

234 J; 3i5 A; 502 A; 524 B; 

560 A. 
Lives of SS. Xenophon, his wife 

Maria, and his two sons John 

and Arcadius, 70 D. 
Life of St. Yar6th, 593 M. 
Life of St. Zai'a, 200 B. 
Life of St. Zena, 22 U. 
Lights in the Church, 545 E. 
Limbs of Christ, meaning and 

significance, 105 Z. 



130 

List and history of the West 
Syrian Patriarch of Antioch, 
484 B. 

List of names of all West Syrian 
Patriarchs of Antioch, 3 J. 

List of West Syrian Patriarchs, 

53i B. 

List of works of Barhebrseus, 
159 D ; 161 N ; 385 B. 

Liturgy (for Liturgy of single 
saints, etc., see General Index 
s.v.),3B, D; 32 C; 35 A; 56 
73 E ; 97 D ; 106 G ; 128 E 
215 E ; 236 ; 242 C ; 384 B 
391 B, E, F, G, H, I; 515 
527 ; 561 B ; 566 C, V. 

Liturgy, Baptismal, 611 M. 

Liturgy of the East Syrians, 53 A, 
B ; 78 B ; 128 E. 

Liturgy, East Syrian, explana- 
tion, 84 D, E ; 566 V ; 604 I. 

Liturgy, Eucharistic, 611 K. 

Liturgy of the twelve Apostles, 
515 E. 

Liturgy of the Maronite Church, 
625 E. 

Liturgy of the Mass, Explanation 
by John bar Zu 'bi, 55 B. 

Liturgy of the West Syrians, 97 
D ; 236 j 242 C ; 251 N ; 254 
293 A ; 298 B ; 312 ; 366 A 
384 B ; 387 B ; 413 ; 417 A 
448 A ; 451 ; 454 ; 515 ; 521 
F ; 526 C ; 527 B, C ; 529 J I 

563. 
Liturgy of the West Syrian Church. 

Explanation by Dionysius Bar- 

salibi, 97 D ; 137 A ; 183 D ; 

215 E ; 225 C ; 317 A ; 386 A ; 

515 O; 522 C. 
Liturgy of the West Syrian Church. 

Explanation by Jacob of Edessa, 

317 B. 

Liturgy of the West Syrian Church. 

Explanation by Moses bar 

Kepha, 2 B ; 112 A ; 155 A. 
Logic, 6 A, B ; 44 A ; 47 ww ; 

94 C ; 101 A ; 280 ; 392 I ; 

433 B, C ; 435 A ; 558 ; 574 ; 

584 A ; 625 A. 



SUBJECT INDEX 

Logic, by Barhebrseus, see Isagoge. 
Lord's Day (Sunday), 87 G. 
Lord's Prayer, The, 284 B ; 299 G ; 

393 B ; 514 G ; 561 B. 
Love, 26 D ; 87 E ; 97 F ; 464 J ; 

607 M. 
Love, divine, 6 E ; 38 A ; 44 J ; 

392 G. 
Love of God, 14 ; 26 H ; 331 N. 
Love of knowledge, 51 A ; 338 E ; 

488 C. 
Low Sunday, 408. 

M 

Ma'alta, by Barhebrseus, Grammar, 

Metrical. 
Madihah, 242 E ; 243 ; 282 G ; 

366 B ; 382 C ; 499 ; 523 B. 
Madrdsha, by John Saba, 331 E. 
Madrashe of the East Syrian 

church, 421 A. 
Madrashe\ funeral, 570 B. 
Madrashe of the West Syrian 

Church, 383; 388. 
Magic, 341 E ; 378 ; 444 C, D, E ; 

446 R ; 519 B. 
Magnet, by Joseph II, Patriarch 

if the Chaldeans, 487, 490, 491. 
Maimra Zaugdndya', by John 

bar Ma'dini, 471 F. 
Maimri, collection of, by Jacob 

of Serug, 188; 408; 462 B; 

466 ; 494 A-G, M ; 546 A. 
Maimre, seventy-five, by St. 

Ephrem, 545 A. 
Majesty of God, 94 I. 
Malefactor, the good, 223 B ; 

352 A ; 461 A ; 462 B. 
Malhamah, by Daniel the Phil- 
osopher, 191 C ; 311 C. 
Man of God, 82 C. 
Manifestation of Godhead, 450 J. 
Ma'niyatha of the West Syrian 

Church, 45 ; 241 A. 
Manual, epistolary, 314 F. 
Maps, 480 aa, bb, dd. 
Marriage, 4 bb ; 8 Q; 47 ; 76 ; 

171 B ; 278 ; 391 A ;■ 443 B ; 

494 B ; 567 E ; 586 bb ; 611 E. 



Marriage-service, East Syrian, 

519 p. 
Maronite Church, 450. 

Martyrdom of Persons, see General 

Index, s.v. 
Martyrdom and Preaching, see 

Preaching and Martyrdom of the 

Apostles. 
Martyrdom of Pilate, by Cyriacus 

of Oxyrhynchus, 127 K ; 355 B ; 

369 kk. 
Mass, 79 A ; 446 N. 
Massacres, Turkish, of the Armen- 
ians, 1896, 95 S. 
Massora, East Syrian, 98 ; 148 D ; 

(see also Puhhami). 
Matins, 102 D. 
Matoniyat, 236 C. 
Maurbe, 106 D ; 333 B ; 361 B ; 

423 B. 

Ma'watha, by Elijah of Anbar, 
see Book of Centuries. 

Maxims (symbols) of Pythagoras, 
588 C. 

Medicine, 46 B ; 77 M, O, P 
92 Q ; 96 B ; 138 aa ; 220 A 
248 A, B, C; 250 B, C, D 
264 ; 265 A, B, C ; 281 ; 314 F 
341D; 365 H, J; 455; 5i8A 
559 A, B, C ; 584 B ; 589 D f 
E, F, G ; 594 I 661. 

Meekness, 480 C. 

Mendrath Kudhshe, by Barhe- 
brseus, see Candlestick of the 
Sanctuary. 

Menologium of the West Syrian 
Church, 321 B. 

Mental Recitations and Monthly 
Beauty, by Ishak ibn Jubair 
(Timothy Isaac of Amed) , 268 B. 

Merchant, avaricious, 446 O. 

Merchant, The, by John bar Pen- 
kaye, 47 ss. 

Merits, ten, of hunger in fasting, 
422 A. 

Merits of the Virgin, 48 G. 

Merits and Miracles of the Arch- 
angel Michael, 232 E, F. 

Method of praying, 369 C. 

Microcosm, 197 C ; 566 W ; 547 A. 



SUBJECT INDEX 



131 



Miracles, 40 T ; 71 N ; 138 bb ; 

142 B ; 251 U ; 364 ; 367 E ; 

458 B ; 562 K. 
Miracles of the Archangel Gabriel, 

562 J. 
Miracles of the Archangel Michael, 

35 K ; 232 E, F ; 458 B ; 520 

B ; 562 I. 
Miracle of Cana, 387 F. 
Miracles of St. Basil of Caesarea, 

562 D. 
Miracles of SS. Cosmas and 

Damian, 240 D ; 562 E. 
Miracle of St. Elijah of Asbat, 

146 ; 562 L. 
Miracles of St. George, 22 L ; 

146 J, aa ; 155 D ; 562 G. 
Miracles of St. John the Baptist, 

146 I, 00 ; 367 F ; 369 nn ; 

562 F. 
Miracles of St. Matthias, 127 G. 
Miracles of St. Mid a, 458 B. 
Miracles of St. Paladius, 138 C. 
Miracles of Theodore of Euchaita, 

562 H. 
Miracles of the Virgin, 35 H, J, K 

48 E, G, J ; 51 F, P : 87 J 
127 G, I ; 133 C ; 146 D, P, bb 
176 J, L, P ; 295 G, H ; 352 J 
K,L; 364; 458B; 514 D, E 
524 B, C ; 560 D ; 562 A ; 615 
620 B, C. 

Mnemonic Tables, 100 F. 
Monachism, 68 C, D. 
Monasticism, 91 ; 118 ; 151 A ; 

330 B, C ; 401 D ; 466 J. 
Monks, 97 I ; 330 A, B. 
Monophysite Doctrine, 48 C, D ; 

127 D ; 255 A. 
Months, 51 B ; 113 E ; 436. 
Morals, 240 I. 
Music, 456. 
Mysteries, revealed by Our Lord 

to St. Peter, and by St. Peter 

to Clement, 446 I. 
Mysticism, 7 A ; 18 B ; 30 ; 31 ; 

49 Q, T, X ; 60 ; 79 B ; 86 ; 
91 ; 117 ; 143 ; 151 A, B ; 
178 I ; 185 B ; 233 ; 330 A, 
B, C, D, E, F; 348 1), F; 



392 A ; 401 D ; 404 D ; 410 
422 A, D, E ; 457 C ; 487 
490 ; 491 ; 532 C ; 54 1 B 
584 C ; 588 H, N, O ; 601 
604 F, G ; 605 A ; 616 A ; 631 
637 : 638 ; 640 ; 645 ; 649 
650; 655. 
Mythology, Grseco-Roman, 662. 



N 



Name of God, 566 G. 

Names, Divine, 539. 

Names of Christ, 148 C. 

Names of the West Syrian Patri- 
archs of Antioch, 308 C. 

Nature, One nature in three per- 
sons and three persons in one 
nature, 71 T. 

Nature of Christ, 4 pp 5 161 Q. 

Nature of the Christian faith, 

399 B. 

Nature of God, 18 A. 
Nestorianism, 91 C ; 184 K ; 255 A ; 

548 B ; 586 O. 

New Testament, Peshitta version, 

41 ; 103 ; *48 D ; 334 J 368. 

Peshitta version of the East 

Syrian Church; 540 A ; 551. 

Commentary, by Dionysius 

Barsalibi, with exception of 

the Gospels, 89 E, 343 A, 

525- 

Commentary on the New Testa- 
ment, by Barhebraeus, 194. 

Commentary on the New Testa- 
ment, by Isho'dad of Merw, 
131 A ; 541 A. 

The Gospels, Peshitta version, 
332 G ; 422 B ; 430 ; 431 B ; 
473; 6o3- 

The Gospels, Harklean version, 
10 ; 42 ; 105 N (with Com- 
mentary) ; 124 D ; 480 T ; 

497^ 
The Gospels, Garshuni, 261. 

Commentary on the four Gospels, 

by Dionysius Barsalibi, 54; 

105 K ; 332 F ; 480 ; 513. 



New Testament — (cont.) 
Commentary on Gospel lessons 
of the West Syrian Church, 

119 ; 362. 
Canons of the Gospels, by 

Eusebius, see Canons, the ten, 

of Eusebius. 
Explanation of some words in 

the Gospel, 83 K. 
Harklean harmony of the Gos- 
pel, 105 ; 358. 
Harklean Gospel harmony for 

Maunday and Thursday, 105 

Q; 480 Z. 
The Passion Harmony from the 

four Gospels, 607 Q. 
Lessons from the Gospels, 39 ; 

105 B ; 106 E ; 124 A ; 176 

B, H ; 272 A ; 331 C ; 390 C ; 

398 C ; 438 I ; 442 ; 516 ; 

537 ; 607 H, S ; 611 L ; 619 B. 
Magic sayings from the Gospels, 

444 E. 
Mysteries and sacraments 

hidden in the miracles of the 

Gospels, 105 X. 
Parables of the Gospels, Sayings 

of the Gospels, 105 Y. 
Similarities and dissimilarities of 

the four Gospels, by Dionysius 

Barsalibi, 332 F. 
Table of Lessons of the Gospels, 

331 B ; 480 I. 
Treatise on the Gospels, by 

Dionysius Barsalibi, 105 K ; 

480 O. 
Matthew i, 1-17, 633 ; 636. 
Commentary on Matthew v, 26, 

" uttermost farthing," by 

Basil Shim'un of Jur 'Abdin, 

139 B. 
Matthew v, 34, maimra on 

" Swear not at all," by Jacob 

of Serug, 182 K. 
Matthew vii, 28/29 ; viii, 1-4. 

Lesson of the East Syrian 

Church, 590. 
Matthew xi, 2, 188. 
Matthew xvi, 26 Maimra by 

Jacob of Serug, 466 I 



132 



SUBJECT INDEX 



New Testament — (cont.) 

Matthew xxiv, 1-44, 22 G. 

Matthew xxvi, 39. Homily by 
John Chrysostom, 545 H, K. 

List of miracles, parables and 
kephalia in St. Matthew, 480 
P. 

Lessons from the Gospel of 
Matthew, 391 C. 

Genealogies of Christ in Matthew 
and Luke, 105 M ; 480 R. 

Peculiarities of the Gospel of 
Matthew, 105 L. 

Luke hi, 11-20 ; vii, 18-21. 
Lectionary for the Com- 
memoration of St. John, 
Peshitta Version, 516. 

Luke xxiv, 53, 632. 

Commentary on the Gospel of 
John, by Theodore of Mop- 
suestia, 52 A. 

Gospel of St. John. Lesson 
for Pentecost, 607 P. 

Fragment of the Gospel of St. 
John, Peshitta version, 508. 

Lessons from the Gospel of John, 
391 C. 

Acts of the Apostles, Peshitta 
version, 480 ee. 

Acts of the Apostles, Pauline 
and Catholic Epistles, Pes- 
hitta version, 356. 

Book of Acts. Pauline and 
Catholic Epistles, 627. 

Acts i, 6-16 ; Acts iv, 36 — v, 9, 

635- 

Acts xiii, 26 — xiv, 16, 633. 

Commentary on the Book of 
Acts, by Dionysius Barsalibi, 
89 E. 

Lectionary from the Book of 
Acts. Melchite Church, 658. 

Pauline Epistles, Peshitta ver- 
sion, 480 ii ; 485. 

Lectionary of the Pauline Epis- 
tles according to the East 
Syrian Church, 227. 

Lectionary from the Pauline 
Epistles. Melchite Church, 
658. 



New Testament — (cont.) 

Lectionary from Pauline Epis- 
tle according to the West 
Syrian Uniats, 302. 

Epistle to the Romans. Epistle 
to the Corinthians. Maimras 
by deacon 'Abd al- Wahid, 
177 C. 

Epistle to the Romans. Epistle 
to the Corinthians. Quota- 
tions and anonymous com- 
mentary, 251 Q. 

II Corinthians ii, 8 — iv, 18, 634. 

Lessons from the Epistle to the 
Corinthians, 391 C. 

Letter to the Colossians. Let- 
ter to the Thessalonians. 
Commentary by John Chry- 
sostom, 8 kk. 

Epistle of St. Paul to 2 Timothy, 
42 D. 

Epistle to the Hebrews (Com- 
mentary), 14 ; 42 D. 

Life of St. Paul and division of 
the Pauline Epistles into 
chapters, by Euthalius, 343 B. 

Quotations from Pauline and 
Catholic Epistles, 73 D. 

Catholic Epistles, 480 ff. 

Lectionary from the Catholic 
Epistles, according to the 
West Syrian Church, 331 C. 

Epistle of St. James, 42 D. 

1 John ii, 4-16, 635. 

Lectionary from the Book of 
Revelation. Maronite Church, 
623. 

Apocalypse of St. John. A 
homily by John Chrysostom, 
21 N. 

Commentary on the Apocalypse 
of St. John, by Dionysius 
Barsalibi, 89 D. 

Commentary on the Apocalypse 
of St. John, by John Stephen 
Menochius, S.J., 492. 

Acts of Matthias, 524 C. 

Acts of Thomas, 524 A ; 543 A. 

Apocalyptic treatise, 225 0, Q, 
V. 



New Testament — (cont.) 

Apocalypse of Paul, 225 V ; 
263 J ; 299 E ; 367 A ; 401 1 ; 
439 A; 446 11; 549 I; 598 A. 

Apocalypse of Peter (or Book of 
Clement, or Book of the Rolls, 
or Book of Utilities and 
Secrets), 70 A ; 92 K ; 106 F ; 
138 U ; 225 G ; 369 H ; 411 B ; 
441 A, D ; 446 I ; 555. 

Epistles of Clement of Rome, 
see s.v. 

Testament of Clement of Rome, 
see s.v. 

Gospel of the Infancy, 5 B ; 39 
I ; 48 A ; 105 F ; 114 B ; 
560 A. 

" Second Book " (Protoevan- 
gelium), 114 D. 

Annunciation of John the Bap- 
tist and of the Christ, and a 
commentary on it, 39 B. 

Baptism of fire, 566 I, J. 

Baptism of our Lord, 401 H ; 
403 N ; 450 K ; 186 G. 

Baptism of our Lord. Maimra 
by Jacob of Serug, 446 ii. 

Betrayal of our Lord by Judas, 
446 K. 

Burial of our Lord, 403 S. 

The Cherub and the good male- 
factor. Maimra by Jacob of 
Serug, 408. 

Chronological events of the life 
of our Lord, 460 F. 

Confusion of tongues and the 
gifts to the Apostles. Maim- 
ra by Jacob of Serug, 408. 

Crucifixion and burial of our 
Lord, 105 P. 

Death and burial of our Lord. 
Homily by Epiphanius of 
Cyprus, 480 Y. 

Denial of Peter. Discourse by 
Cyril of Alexandria, 545 F. 

Denial of Peter. Maimra by 
Jacob of Serug, 408. 

Entry of our Lord into Jerusa- 
lem. Maimra by St. Ephrem, 
467 B. 



SUBJECT INDEX 



133 



New Testament — (conL) 

The Entry of our Lord into the 
Temple, 144 B. 

Exegetical and historical ques- 
tions, 566 R. 

The Guests in the parable of the 
wedding in the Gospels, 401 A. 

History of the Apostles, etc., 
566 K. 

How the Jews railed at Joseph 
and Mary, 560 B. 

Jesus Christ and His Mother, 

39 H. 
Leper of the Gospels. Maimra 

by Jacob of Serug, 408. 
The Leper of the Gospels. 

Homily by Moses bar Kepha., 

607 F. 
Leper of the Gospel. Homily 

by Severus of Antioch, 369 W. 
Limbs of Christ, 480 rr. 
The Man from whom our Lord 

drove the " Legion " of de- 
mons. Maimra by Jacob of 

Serug, 408. 
Miracles of Christ, 480 pp. 
Nativity, 39 O ; 130 D ; 144 B ; 

403 M; 450 E, F; 545 D. 
Ninety-nine commandments of 

our Lord found in the Gospels, 

460 L ; 607 C. 
Parable of the Gospel and the 

apple, 39 L. 
The Paralytic healed by our 

Lord. Maimra by Jacob of 

Serug, 408. 
Passion of our Lord, 44 R ; 

47 yy ; 140 ; 195 c. 

Passion of our Lord. Homily 
by John Chrysostom, 461 D ; 

545 K. 

Passion of our Lord. Maimra 
by Jacob of Serug, 408. 

The Pharisee and the Publican. 
Discourse by John Chrysos- 
tom, 401 C. 

Preaching of Peter and Paul, 
441 C. 

Presentation of our Lord, 95 T ; 
291 G ; 450 M. 



New Testament — (cont.) 

Resurrection of Christ, 67 D ; 
88 A ; 127 C ; 140. 

Resurrection of Lazarus. 
Homily by John Chrysostom. 
465 L. 

Sayings and parables of Christ, 
480 gg. 

Silver, the thirty pieces of silver 
for which our Lord was sold, 
71 bb. 

Temptation of our Lord, 403 Q ; 
607 E. 

The Washing of the feet of the 
Apostles, 144 B. 

Woman who anointed the feet 
of our Lord. Maimra by 
Jacob of Serug, 446 U. 

The Woman whose sins were for- 
given by our Lord. Maimra 
by Jacob of Serug, 408. 
Nocturns, 102 B. 
Nomocanon, by Barhebraeus, 1 A ; 

159 C; 385 A. 
Noun, 337 E. 
Nuhhdr Sharwdye, by Timothy 

Isaac of Amed (Ishak ibn 

Jubair). See Enlightment of 

Beginners. 
Numbers, mystical and sacramen- 
tal use, 186 B. 







Oath, 604 S. 

Obedience to parents, 146 K. 

Obligations, 37 A ; 225 L ; 345 J ; 
379 A; 494 H. 

Octoechus of the Melchites, 262 A ; 
582. 

Office-Book of the East Syrians, 
25 ; 210 A ; 213 A (explana- 
tion) ; 517 A, B ; 576 (ex- 
planation by George of Arbel). 

Office-Book of the West Syrians, 
329; 333 A; 350; 361 A; 
372 A ; 375 ; 413 (extracts). 

Office-Book for the West Syrian 
Uniats, 398. 



Old Testament — 
Old Testament without Penta- 
teuch and Psalms, 63 ; 279 ; 
484; 486 
Old Testament, some Books, 

with Apocrypha, 484 ; 486. 
Commentary, by Dionysius Bar- 

salibi, 152 B. 
Discourse on some points of the 

O.T., 461 G. 
Explanation of difficult words 
and passages in the Harklean 
Version, by Jacob of Edessa, 
339 D. 
Explanatory notes, 342 B, F. 
Lectionary of the East Syrian 

Church, 506. 
Lectionary, Maronite Church, 

623. 
Pentateuch, Peshitta version, 

267 B ; 478. 
Commentary on the Pentateuch, 

132 A; 354; 477; 553. 
Commentary on the Pentateuch, 

by Jacob of Edessa, 147. 
Genesis, 138 X ; 177 A ; 257 B ; 

339 D ; 523 E ; 566 Q. 
Exodus xv, 1-5, 660. 
Exodus xv, 1-21 ; Deut. xxxii 
(Song of Moses), 10-13, 284 
A ; 300 A ; 393 B ; 428 A ; 
507 A' 
Exodus xxx, 659. 
Numbers xxvi 15-48, 653. 
Commentary on Genesis, by St. 
Ephrem and Jacob of Edessa, 
147 C. 
Commentary on the Book of 

Genesis, 181 ; 566 Q. 
Commentary on Exodus, by St. 

Ephrem, 147 D. 
Commentary on Leviticus, by 

CyriJ of Alexandria, 275. 
Book of the Sessions, Peshitta 

version, 437 ; 504 ; 552. 
Books of Samuel and Kings, 

Garshuni, 206 B. 
1 Samuel II, 1-10 (Canticle of 
the prophetess Hannah), 284 
B ; 300 A. 



134 



SUBJECT INDEX 



Old Testament — (cont.) 

I Samuel xv, 12-20, Peshitta 

version, 630. 
Books of Chronicles (i/ii), n A. 
Esther, 256. 

Job, 245 ; 339 D ; 446 T. 
Job xviii, xix, xx, xxi, 198. 
Job, quotation, 238 B. 
Job, historical note about, 38 E. 
Job, Sughitha, 190 L. 
Job, Story of, 229 C ; 446 T. 
Commentary on Job, Joshua and 

Judges, by Jacob of Edessa, 

147 B. 
Psalms (see also Psalter), 4 ff ; 

52 B ; 175 F ; 234 G ; 287 ; 

483 D ; 660. 
Psalms, Commentary by Daniel 

of Telle, 147 E. 
Psalms, Treatise on, by Moses 

bar Kepha, 152 C. 
Psalm 6. Homily by John 

Chrysostom, 464 N. 
Psalm 149 : Sing unto the Lord 

a new song, Maimra by Jacob 

of Serug, 174 H ; 403 O. 
Psalm 151 (uncanonical), 31 

58 D ; 193 ; 224 ; 284 A 

300 A ; 393 B ; 452 A ; 462 A 

622. 
Psalm (five apocryphal), 31 ; 

51 U ; 579 B. 
Proverbs, 2 B ; 543 G (Garshuni). 
Proverbs, explanation of sym- 
bols, 68 F. 
Ecclesiastes, 2 B ; 4 gg ; 488 A ; 

543 F (Garshuni) ; 588 I. 
Ecclesiastes. Commentary by 

John, the Seer of the Thebaid, 

14 ; 331 J. 

Song of Solomon, 543 E (Gar- 
shuni) ; 588 J ; 628. 

Book of the Prophets, 64 ; 98 ; 
152 F, H ; 427 ; 489. 

Book of the Prophets and other 
Books of the O.T., Garshuni, 
624. 

History of the Prophets, by 
Epiphanius of Cyprus, 108 H ; 
567 A. 



Old Testament — (cont.) 

Sections of the Book of Isaiah, 

607 V. 
Song of Isaiah, xlii, 10-13, 

284 A, B ; 300 A ; 393 B ; 

428 A ; 507 A. 
Jeremiah and destruction of 

Jerusalem. Maimra, 407. 
Ezekiel. Maimra on the chariot, 

by Jacob of Serug, 97 E. 
The Book of the Prophet Daniel, 

607 U. 
Daniel, explanation of the 

vision, 105 E. 
Daniel, Prognostications, see 

Prognostications . 
Daniel, the Philosopher, see 

Malhamah. 
Minor Prophets, see Prophets. 
Jonah, 39 C ; 263 H ; 284 B ; 

446 G. 
Jonah and Nineveh. Maimre of 

St. Ephrem, 545 G. 
Habakkuk, 4 ee ; 284 B ; 300 A. 
Apocrypha, 63 ; 256 ; 279 ; 484 ; 

486. 
Song of the Three Children, 

83 I ; 284 B ; 300 A ; 438 

A, D ; 507 B ; 529 G ; 537. 
Story of Bel and the Dragon, 

98; 427; 489. 
Ecclesiasticus, 190 B ; 256 ; 

342 B ; 412 A ; 436 C ; 437 ; 

483 A ; 488 A ; 504 ; 552. 
Judith, 11 C. 
in Maccabees iv, 15-v, 5 and 

v, 31-43, 629. 
Book of Susanna, 11 B ; 529 D ; 

598 M. 
Tobit (Septuaginta version), 

19 B. 
Wisdom of Solomon, 4 ii ; 29 B 

(explanation) ; 51 F ; 127 F ; 

488 A ; 607 T. 
Aaron, Maimra on, 138 cc. 
Aphikia, wife of Jesus, son of 

Sirach, 412 B. 
Burial of Aaron. Maimra by 

St. Ephrem and Jacob of 

Serug, 466 B. 



Old Testament — (cont.) 
Confusion of tongues, 566 O. 
Conversation between Pharaoh 

and Ahikar, 237 A. 
Conversation of Moses with God, 

82 A ; 176 I ; 223 C ; 295 F ; 

369 S ; 411 C ; 446 W ; 

543 D- 
Creation of the Birds, 258 B. 
Creation of the Stars, 258 B. 
Days of the month mentioned 

by Moses in the Pentateuch, 

367 H. 
Death of Aaron. Maimra by 

Jacob of Serug, 453 B. 
Deportation of the Jews to 

Babylon, 240 B ; 369 mm ; 

500 C. 
Elijah. Maimra by St. Ephrem, 

138 dd; 352 D; 446 Z. 
Historical Notes on the Patri- 
archs and Prophets, 161 K ; 

342 F ; 480 A. 
Joseph, Life or Story, 146 A ; 

177 A ; 184 Q ; 257 B ; 369 A ; 

411 D ; 562 S. 
List of the Kings of Israel and 

Judah, 108 J. 
Magic use of the Canonical 

Psalms, 444 D. 
Salomon, son of David, and of 

the palace of Shad, son of 

'Ad, 411 F ; 439 C ; 463 E. 
Questions, seven, which the 

Queen of Sheba asked, 480 jj. 
Vision of Ezra, 567 C. 
Olive, 4 Y ; 604 R. 
Oneness of nature in Christ, 95 E. 
Oral Confession, by Christopher 

de Vega, 145. 
Order of the consecration of the 

oil, 127 L. 
Order of the Lamp, The, accord- 
ing to the Syrians and the 
Copts, 182 L. 
Order of marriage, according to 

the West Syrian Church, 278. 
Order of Penitence of the West 
Syrian Church, 128 D ; 217 A. 
Order of prayers, 102 G. 



SUBJECT INDEX 



135 



Order of the renovation of the 
holy leaven, 128 B. 

Order of service, 71 X. 

Ordination, 56. 

Ordinances, civil and ecclesias- 
tical, 586 W, X, Y. 

Organisation of the Church, 607 R. 



Pains suffered by the Virgin, 

127 H. 
Palace, built by St. Thomas, 

453 C. 
Palm Sunday, 3D; 545 E ; 611 B. 
Parable of the Apple, 607 J. 
Paracleticon, 582. 
Paradise, 65 A ; 67 A; 324 ; 

460 O ; 476 A. 
Paradise of Eden, by 'Abdisho' 

of Nisibin, 59 ; 92 B, D ; 

212 A ; 328 ; 421 B ; 548 C ; 

579 B. 

Paradise of the Fathers, by 'Enan- 

Isho', 22 N ; 370 C ; 403 A ; 

422 E ; 445 F ; 641 ; 642 ; 643. 
Paradise of the Egyptian Fathers, 

by Philoxenus of Mebbug, 370 

C ; 403 A ; 457 C ; see also 

History of the Egyptian Fathers 

of the Desert. 
Paradise of Monks, 177 B. 
Passion Week, 545 J. 
Passover, Christian, 195 F ; 545 D. 
Passover of the Jews, 545 K. 
Path of the Perfect, The, by John 

bar Ma'dini, 6 1; 44 I ; 50 H ; 

178 D ; 331 P ; 392 C ; 471 F. 
Path of perfection, 51 H ; 331 R ; 

471 F. 
Path of righteousness, 97 G. 
Patriarchate, 47 L. 
Peace, 49 M ; 466 J. 
Pearl, by 'Abdisho' of Nisibin, 

36 A ; 212 B ; 568 A. 
Penitence, 20 B ; 26 E ; 28 B 

35 B, C; 49 G, H; 51 D 

77 E, F, G, H, T, J, L ; 80 E) 



97 K, L,M, Q; 127 A; 128 D 
130 B, E; 138 B; 154 B 
174 F ; 176 K ; 182 A, F 
183 A ; 186 A ; 190 L ; 190 M 
214 F, G ; 217 A ; 232 I, J 
234 B, C, D ; 251 A, C, J 
286 B ; 295 C ; 297 F ; 299 F 
331 K; 345D,G,H,I; 348 C 
369 Z ; 377 E ; 387 E ; 401 G 
403 F, G ; 423 C, D ; 446 H 
kk ; 452 C ; 461 F ; 464 F, G 
I, P, Q; 465 A, D, G, I 
488 B ; 493 B ; 494 D, I, J 
521 A, B ; 522 B ; 536 A, B 
545 K ; 549 E, F ; 562 N, 
596 B ; 601 W ; 604 K ; 611 H 
656. 

Pentecost, 3 B ; 67 E ; 600 L. 

Perfection, 47 qq ; 68 E ; 97 H 
J; 164 C; 168 A; 282 M 
330 C; 348 E; 392 B, C 
410 F. 

IJepl 'Epfjirjvetais, by Aristotle, 
43 B, C, E ; 605 D. 

Persecution, 47 P ; 405 C. 

Persons of God, 588 B. 

Pharmaceutics, 250 C ; 264. 

Philosophy, 4 V, W ; 29 A ; 44 
47 zz, aaa ; 101 A ; 180 E 
190 G ; 280 ; 282 F, J ; 309 
310 B ; 326 ; 336 C ; 338 E 
339 A ; 342 L ; 346 A ; 420 J 
471 A ; 472 B ; 480 Q ; 530 
547 B, C, D, F ; 558 ; 559 D 
606. 

Physics, 6 A ; 71 R ; 211 ; 369 N 
376; 435 A; 559 A, D; 581 A. 

Poetry, 92 R; 178 F, G, H 
182 G ; 184 F, G, H ; 190 L 
214 A ; 242 A, B, H ; 282 A 
318 B ; 369 E ; 382 E ; 387 A 
392 D, E ; 404 B, C ; 445 A 
471 G ; 472 C ; 500 ; 610 A 
612 ; 613 ; 646 ; 647. 

Poetry, by Barhebraeus, 282 B, 0, 
M ; 294 B ; 338 A ; 471 D. 

Poetry, by Dionysius Behnam, 
126 B. 

Poetry, by George Warda, 214 A ; 
505 A. 



Poetry, by Ignatius Ni'mat Allah, 
282 E. 

Poetry, by John bar Ma'dini, 
282 C ; 392 D. 

Poetry, by Khamis bar Kardahe\ 
149 B ; 159 A ; 178 G. 

Power of God, 18 A, D. 

Power of spiritual self-exertion, 
601 I. 

Praises of the Virgin, 48 F, H. 

Prayers, 3 H ; 4 P, mm ; 20 B 
28 B, C, D, E, F; 55 A ; 68 1 
78; 83 A, E; 86 B, C, E 
87 A ; 97 ; 100 D ; 102 C, F 
H; 105 M, V; 130 B, C 
134 C; 155 J; 168 B; 175 A 
B, C, D ; 176 A, C, G ; 184 B 
E, L, S ; 185 A ; 190 C, D 
202 ; 205 A, B, D ; 210 A, B 
214 F, G ; 217 B ; 220 D, G 
234 E, H ; 241 D ; 242 C, F 
H ; 251 0, T ; 270 B ; 272 D 
284 C; 285; 286 B; 287 
291 A ; 293 A ; 295 I ; 315 B 
322 ; 331 A ; 333 B ; 345 E 
348 B ; 355 E ; 359 B ; 361 B 
363 B ; 369 R, aa, bb, cc, ff 
372 D; 377 A, C; 397 
398 C ; 404 A ; 438 A, B, C 
D, F ; 445 G ; 452 B ; 459 
466 K, M, N ; 480 H ; 483 B 
488 E; 514 C; 518 E, F 
519 F ; 521 E ; 526 A, D 
529 G; 542 C; 549 B, E 
564 A, H, J, M, P, 0, Q 
566 aa, bb ; 575 A ; 588 M 
600 C ; 601 T, W ; 604 D, P, 
Q, T ; 607 I, ; 611 C. 

Prayer-book of the West Syrians, 
283; 415; 621. 

Prayer-book for West Syrian 
Uniats, 203 ; 320 ; 398. 

Preaching and Martyrdom of the 
Apostles, 40. 

Preparation for the Mass, 611 G. 

Preparation for prayers, 359 A. 

Prescience of Christ, 180 D. 
Priests, Priesthood, 3 F ; 49 ; 
146 A, dd ; 232 D ; 271 ; 324 ; 
476 A. 



136 

Principles, logical, grammatical 

and physical, 47 ww. 
Problems, by Alexander Aphro- 

disasus, 559 A. 
Profession of Faith, 95 C ; 203 D 

E ; 215 C ; 220 E ; 255 A 

271 R ; 308 D, E ; 414 D 

460 B ; 481 A ; 495 C ; 507 B 

514 J ; 561 A ; 580 G. 
Profession of Faith, by Barhe- 

brseus, 79 C ; 87 H ; 95 P ; 

585 B ; 616 B. 
Profession of Faith, by Jacob of 

Edessa, 37 C ; 95 P. 
Profession of Faith, by Philoxenus 

of Mebbug, 95 Q ; 105 S ; 

480 11; 577 F. 
Profession of Faith, by Severus of 

Antioch, 95 H ; 138 Z ; 174 A ; 

370 A ; 457 A ; 481. 
Prognostications, 191 A, C. 
Prognostications of Daniel the 

Prophet, 436 A. 
Promiyon on the Liturgy, 39 A ; 

298 A, C, H. 
Proper names, Hebrew, 131 D. 
Prophecy of the Patriarch Papa, 

47 P- 
Prosopon of Christ, 586 L. 

IJpoOeais, 44 E. 
Proverbs of Agur, 365 I. 
Providence, Divine, 100 A ; 601 

V. 
The Psalter, East Syrian, 25 ; 

58 ; 102 A ; 428 A ; 507 A ; 

602. 
Psalter, West Syrian, 125 ; 193 ; 

199 ; 222 ; 224 ; 260 B ; 281 ; 

284 A ; 300 A ; 378 ; 384 A ; 

390 ; 393 A ; 452 A ; 462 A ; 

622. 
Puhhame\ 10 ; 198 ; 334 ; 358 ; 

393 C; 489; 508; 516; 627. 
Punctuation, 424 B, C. 
Punishment, 49 N ; 77 K. 
Pupils of the Eyes, by Barhebraeus, 

6 B ; 339 A ; 392 I. 
Purification, 4 Y ; 16 A; 330 

D. 
Purity of thoughts t 422 D. 



SUBJECT INDEX 
Q 

Quality of bread and wine, 479 B. 
Questions, theological, 4 L, X ; 

71 M ; 367 B ; 435 C ; 445 B ; 

446 P ; 481 C ; 520 F ; 562 Y, 

bb; 566 E, X; 586 Z, aa ; 

587 I ; 604 E, G ; 607 R. 
Quiet, 49 I ; 97 F. 

R 

Rancour, 35 B. 

Rays, by Barhebraeus, see Book of 

Rays. 
Rdzdndydtha, by Dionysius Bar- 

salibi, 215 B, F. 
Rebuke of the ignorant, 403 L. 
Recommendations, 68 A. 
Rejection of Worries, The, by Elijah 

of Nisibin, 189 A. 
Relationship, spiritual and carnal, 

4 bb. 
Renewal of the earth, 55 A. 
Renovation of the holy leaven, 

604 M. 
Repentance, 464 D ; 529 C. 
Reprobation of the world, 55 A. 
Resurrection of the dead, 9 B 

56 ; 197 D ; 215 A ; 240 F 

403 T ; 464 H ; 480 ww 

494 M; 598 C. 
Revelations, 22 H ; 55 A ; 70 A ; 

458 A. 
Rhetoric; 371 ; 402 A ; 625 B. 
Riddles and enigmas, 4 rr ; 80 D 

108 iv, Q; 190 P; 282 H 

338 D ; 369 I ; 404 B ; 488 D 
548 A; 566 M,T. 

Riddle, 94 C. 

Righteousness, 190 L. 

Ritual, 16 A, B ; 76 ; 81 ; 92 I 
M ; 127 L ; 128 A, C ; 134 A 
171 A, B ; 182 M; N ; 225 F 
244; 270 A; 278; 293 A 
366 D ; 380 A ; 391 A, D 
443 B ; 519 B ; 521 A ; 529 I 
533 A, B ; 534 A, B ; 564 C, D 
F, G, K, L, N, R, S ; 586 Z 
596 A ; 604 J, K, L, M, N, 0, 
S, T ; 611 ; 625 D. 



Rogations, 195 M ; 566 bb. 
Rules, monastic, 495 A, B. 
Rukkakha, 501 H, I, J. 



Sacramentary , by Dionysius Bar- 

salibi, 215 B, F. 
Sacraments, 13 A ; 137 B ; 272 

B ; 342 C, D ; 377 E ; 561 B ; 

566 F. 
Sacred Heart of Jesus, devotion of, 

228. 
Sacrifices, 4 P, R ; 38 F ; 298 

G. 
Sacrifices of the Jews and the 

Armenians, 87 C, D ; 100 E. 
Sahrah (Prayers to the Virgin), 

207 C ; 459 E. 
Salutations to the Archangels 

Gabriel and Michael, 203 A ; 

205 B. 
Salutations to the Virgin accord- 
ing to the West Syrian Uniats, 

251 L ; 521 D. 
Sanctification of the Church, by 
■ John Chrysostom, 127 E. 
Satan, 4 P. 
Sayings, pious, 68 A ; 190 I ; 369 

X, gg ; 514 L ; 601 D, H. 
Sayings of pagan philosophers, 

420 J ; 481 B. 
Scala Paradisi, by John Climacus, 

400. 
Second coming of Christ, 494 Q. 
Secrets revealed by Christ to Peter 

and by Peter to Clement, 70 A. 
Self-exertion, 601 I. 
Sermons, 274. 
Sermons, by Basil Shim'un of 

Jur 'Abdin, 141 A ; 416. 
Sermons, by Dionysius Behnam, 

126 A, C. 
Sermons, by Patriarch Ignatius 

Shukr-Allah, 153 ; 277 B ; 414 

A ; 460 Q. 
Sermons, by Bishop Rizk-Allah, 

277 A. 
Service, 183 C ; 291 B ; 570 A, C. 



Service-Book of the East Syrian 
Church (see also Office-Book), 
102 ; 128 ; 135 ; 210 D ; 219 
B. C ; 425 ; 428 ; 429 ; 432 ; 
503 A ; 520 A ; 570 ; 604 I. 

Service-Book of the East Syrian 
Church, Explanations, by 
'Abdisho' of Nisibin, 604 I. 

Service-Book of the Melchite 
Church, 81 ; 617 ; 618 ; 619 A. 

Service-Book of the West Syrian 
Church (see also Office-Book), 
72 ; 90 ; 236 ; 239 ; 288 ; 296 ; 
301 A; 303; 321 A; 350; 
351 ; 372 A ; 375 ; 423 A ; 

565 B ; 572. 
Seven-Hours prayer-book, 331 A. 
Sewadh Sophia, by Barhebraeus. 

See Speech of Wisdom. 
Shehima, 303 ; 333 A ; 423 A. 
Shumlaye of the West Syrians, 82 

K ; 242 D ; 301 B ; 382 A, B ; 

414 C. 
Shurraye* of the West Syrian 

Church, 106 C. 
Sidre of the West Syrians, 39 A ; 

183 B ; 365 C ; 526 A. 
Signs of Holy Birth, 436 B. 
Signs of vocation, 379 A. 
Simhe, by Barhebraeus, see 

Grammar, Prose. 
Sin, 4 Q ; 49 P ; 65 A, C ; 138 A ; 

190 Q; 207 A, B; 223 F; 464 D. 
Sketches, historical, on the Coun- 
cils, 95. 
Solitaries, 97 F, I ; 348 E. 
Son, Prodigal, 464 L. 
Sorrow of the Virgin, 87 I. 
Soul, 6 F, H ; 9 A ; 44 H, I ; 

47 11 ; 51 N ; 95 A ; 138 J ; 

161 P ; 178 B, C ; 324 ; 331 0, 

Q, R ; 392 H ; 465 1 1 47* E > 

476 A ; 480 K ; 494 F, G. 
Speech of Wisdom, by Barhebraeus, 

6 A; 346 A; 435 A ; 471 A ; 

547 D. 
Spirits, evil, 190 C, D. 
Spiritual Medicine, The, 453 A. 
Spiritual Ship, The, by Basil 

Mas'ud, 91. 



SUBJECT INDEX 

Spiritual Zion, 480 uu. 
Spirituality, 47 pp ; 49 B, Q ; 

68 F ; 86 M, N ; 97 F, N ; 

138 D ; 330 E ; 519 A. 
Stars, 165 B ; 581 C. 
State of affairs, christological, 

95 J- 

Storehouse of Sacraments, by Bar- 
hebraeus, 19 A ; 194 ; 253 ; 394 ; 
470 ; 480 T ; 549 J. 

Story, see General Index. 

Stories, pious, 71 N ; 562 C. 

Stories and anecdotes, different, 

133 D, E. 

Strangers, 462 B ; 514 F. 
Structure of heaven and earth, 

445 D. 
Stumbling Block, 221. 
Sughitha, 51 E ; 129 A ; 149 C, 

D, E ; 190 L ; 210 D ; 245 ; 

251 T ; 295 K ; 397 E ; 494 

J, K, L, S ; 536 B. 
Sultans, Turkish, 342 J. 
Sunday, 26 I ; 35 D ; 195 K. 
Supplications, 210 A ; 298 F, I ; 

322 ; 423 G ; 514 C. 
Supremacy of the Pope of Rome, 

221 ; 344 G. 
Symbols, explanations of, 87 A. 
Synaxarium of the West Syrians, 

234 K ; 318 C ; 496 A. 
Synodicon, by 'Abdisho' of Nisibin, 

120 F ; 246 A. 

Synods, general, of the Church, 

271. 
Synods of the Patriarchs of the 

East Syrian Church, 77 Q ; 

121 F ; 586 J. 



Tabernacle, 108 B ; 161 C. 
Takhshpatha, 242 G ; 352 B ; 

372 B. 
Talismans, 341 E. 
Tarajim of the Patriarch Elijah 

III, 201. 
Teaching of Simon Cephas in the 

City of Rome, 4 G. 



137 

Temple of Solomon, 161 C '> 
480 cc. 

Temptation of a Father in the 
desert, 21 A. 

Terms, philosophical, 282 F, J. 

Testament of Clement, 12 A. 

Testament of Peter or Severus 
al- Jamil, 174 B ; 446 R. 

Thanksgiving, '465 G. 

Theology, 6 A ; 31 ; 32 B ; 36 A 
37 D ; 108 O, P, Q ; .123 
155 E ; 208 A ; 220 B ; 223 G 
240 G ; 290 ; 297 D ; 308 A 
324 ; 349 ; 418 ; 435 A ; 47^ A 
521 I ; 539 J 54i B ; 559 D 

568 A ; 608 B ; 616 A, C 
625 C ; 640 ; 645 ; 651. 

Theology, by Basil or the Ma- 
pharian Shim'un at-Turani, 247. 
Theory, divine, 605 A. 
Theory, spiritual, 601 P. 
Therapeutics, 594 A. 
Thoughts, bad, 68 J. 
Thunder and the Lightning, the, 

234 A. 
Tishbhatha, 16 C ; 25 ; 102 D ; 

507 B. 
Tishbohta, by Elijah of Nisibin, 

210 C. 
Tishmshatha, 236 C. 
Titles of Christ, fifty- two, 105 D ; 

480 B. 
Tomb of Moses, 4 Z. 
Tonsure of the monks, 295 L. 
Torments of hell, 218 A. 
Tortures of Daniel of Mardin, 

306 C. 
Tranquillity, 14. 
Transgression of Adam, 178 C. 
Treasure of Grammatical Questions, 

by Isho'yahb of Arbel, 509. 
Treasures, by Jacob bar Shikko 

of Bartilla, 100 A ; 349. 
Treatise, christological and his- 
torical, by Barhebraeus, 365 E. 
Trinity, 35 A ; 113 F, G ; 160 A ; 

161 B ; 209 ; 369 P ; 464 A ; 

569 A ; 601 V ; boy B. 
Trinity and Unity, On, by John 

Ibn 'Assal, 140. 



138 

Trisagion, 95 B ; 155 H ; 284 B ; 

393 B ; 460 A ; 514 H ; 561 C. 
True Belief in the Incarnation, 

The, by George al-Halabi, 

344 A. 
Truth of Christian religion, 178 

A. 
Turgdma, Eulogistic, by Jacob 

Ketarblaya, 113 B. 
Turgame, 129 B ; 219 A ; 314 D ; 

546 A. 
'fur jam, 363 A, D ; 365 L ; 

518 D; 549 A; 597 A. 
Turjam, by Barhebrseus, 596 C. 



U 



Unchastity, 48 A ; 494 B. 
Unction, extreme, 203 G ; 272 C ; 

611 F. 
'Unitha/'Uniyatha, 20 A, B, C, D, 

E, F, G, H, I, J ; 25 ; 28 A, B, 

C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L; 

47 uu ; 77 C ; 80 H ; 121 M ; 

130 A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, 

K ; 131 C ; 149 F, G ; 214 B, 

C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L; 

267 A ; 428 D ; 488 D ; 505 B, 

C; 507 E; 520 A; 564 B; 

566 aa; 593 I. 
' Uniydtha of George Warda, 20 F ; 

130 C ; 512 ; 542 C. 
'Uniydtha of Khamis bar Kardahe\ 

20 B, E ; 28 B, G ; 130 B, D, 

F ; 214 F, I. 
Unity of God, 113 G. 
Utility of prayers, 183 F, G, H. 



SUBJECT INDEX 

V 

Vanity of this world, 164 D ; 

182 B, E ; 401 F ; 446 jj ; 

465 C ; 494 A. 
Verb, 337 C. 
Versions, different, of the Bible, 

65 A. 
Vestments, ecclesiastical, 68 K ; 

100 G ; 215 F. 
Vice, 161 P. 

Vigils of the monks, 190 L. 
Virginity of Mary, 501 E. 
Virtues, 588 N ; 86 F, G ; 161 P ; 

588 N ; 601 F. 
Visions, 5 A ; 39 H, O ; 83 D ; 

114 A ; 225 M ; 232 A ; 458 A ; 

460 N ; 529 B ; 543 B ; 549 I ; 

588 G. 
Visit of the Virgin to Elisabeth, 

39 O. 

Vowels, 38 I. 



W 

Way of the perfect, 6 1; 44 I ; 

178 D. 
Way in which Christ came down 

from heaven, The, 225 D. 
Ways of God, 18 C, D. 
Wife of the priest, 446 Q. 
Winds, 71 R. 
Wine, 4 jj ; 38 A. 
Wine and water of the chalice, 

4Y. 
Winter, 71 R. 
Winter Canons, 294 A. 
Wisdom, divine, 18 D ; 33 B ; 

39 M ; 92 G ; 300 B ; 331 M ; 

435 A, B ; 488 C ; 494 R. 



Wisdom, Divine, by Barhebrasus, 
44 J ; 190 T ; 282 N ; 404 F. 

Wonders, 461 C. 

Words, Greek, 339 C. 

Words, Hebrew, 339 B. 

Words, difficult Syriac, 131 F. 

Works, good, 14 ; 225 T ; 295 C 

Works, different, by Barhebrseus 
6 E, F ; 26 H ; 33 B ; 38 A, D 
44 J: 83 H; 92 C; 138 T 
161 D; 169 B; 178 F„ I 
282 B, M, N ; 294 B ; 300 B 
33i 0, P ; 338 A ; 373 C ; 392 
D, E ; 450 B ; 494 R ; 500 B. 

Works, metrical, by Isaac of 
Antioch, 554. 

Works, poetical, by St. Ephrem, 
612 ; 613. 

Works, various, by Evagrius, 68. 

Works, mystical, by Evagrius, 330 
B ; 410 B. 

Works, mystical, by John of 
Lycopolis (the Seer of the 
Thebaid), 14. 

Works, various, by Moses bar 
Kepha, 2 B ; 9 ; 65 A ; 112 A. 

World, creation and contents, 
100 A. 



Z 



Zanganaya, 392 B, C. 
Zajaliyah, 365 A, B ; 366 B, C. 
Zajaliyat, 357 ; 382 C, F ; 438 

E, G ; 499 ; 500 A ; 549 G. 
Zodiac, 161 E, G ; 165 C ; 311 A ; 

341 C ; 387 I ; 424 H ; 581 D ; 

597 B. 
Zoology, 652.